Here's what it's like to use Facebook's virtual assistant, 'M'

If you press M on why it can’t have an opinion on what’s a good song — surely it could’ve just grabbed the #1 track and dropped it in — it says it can’t give an opinion on such things.

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2
Do schools kill creativity?

Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity.

3
Why do ambitious women have flat heads?

Dame Stephanie Shirley is the most successful tech entrepreneur you never heard of. In the 1960s, she founded a pioneering all-woman software company in the UK, which was ultimately valued at $3 billion, making millionaires of 70 of her team members. In this frank and often hilarious talk, she explains why she went by “Steve,” how she upended the expectations of the time, and shares some sure-fire ways to identify ambitious women …

4
Meet the homeless man who turned his life around by offering book reviews instead of begging

“With some self-motivation and a lot of self-help books, I made the decision to stop taking drugs. But while I was helping myself I also wanted to help the other people I had been living on the streets with. So I started using the money I got from selling books to buy everyone soup and bread everyday instead of spending that money on drugs. Seeing their smiles motivated me to keep using the little I had to spread happiness. From that point on, I knew I never wanted to go back to being a drug addict.”

5
Windows 95 is 20 years old today

Microsoft also introduced its first idea of syncing data between multiple machines in Windows 95. The My Briefcase aimed to sync files between a laptop and desktop machine, and in modern releases of Windows, it’s all cloud-powered thanks to Microsoft’s OneDrive storage service. Microsoft even introduced user profile support in Windows 95 to allow multiple family members to sign in and have their own separate profiles with links and applications. If you weren’t happy with all the new features of Windows 95 then you could have purchased Microsoft Plus! for Windows 95 at the time. It included the Internet Jumpstart Kit (an early version of Internet Explorer), theme support, and a number of system utilities. Subsequent updates to Windows 95 also introduced new features before Windows 98 arrived three years later to improve things even more.

6
How too many rules at work keep you from getting things done

Modern work — from waiting tables to crunching numbers to designing products — is about solving brand-new problems every day, flexibly and collaboratively. But as Yves Morieux shows in this insightful talk, too often, an overload of rules, processes and metrics keeps us from doing our best work together. Meet the new frontier of productivity: cooperation.

7
Your elusive creative genius

Elizabeth Gilbert muses on the impossible things we expect from artists and geniuses — and shares the radical idea that, instead of the rare person "being" a genius, all of us "have" a genius. It's a funny, personal and surprisingly moving talk.

8
Ridley Scott confirms his next movie is Prometheus 2

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9
Doug the Pug lives like Justin Bieber for the day

Famous Internet dog Doug the Pug lives a more pampered life than most pups, but all of his fame and Facebook likes are minuscule in comparison to the celebrity status of Justin Bieber.

10
Windows 10 review

Thankfully 2015 Microsoft is pretty different to 2012 Microsoft. The key management of the corporation has changed. It has woken up to the fact that people can choose other operating systems. It's keen on making stuff for OS X, Linux, iOS and Android. As you'll hear, it's allowing apps from other platforms to be easily ported to Windows, too.

11
Americans’ Views on Mobile Etiquette

It turns out that people think different kinds of public and social settings warrant different sensitivities about civil behavior. For instance, fully 77% of all adults think it is generally OK for people to use their cellphones while walking down the street and 75% believe it is OK for others to use phones on public transit. But only 38% think it is generally OK for others to use cellphones at restaurants and just 5% think it is generally OK to use a cellphone at a meeting.

12
Blackpool Beach in 1954: The making of a tourist destination

Blackpool, a seaside town in the county of Lancashire, has all the staples of a typical British working class holiday resort: ice cream, donkey rides, saucy postcards, "Kiss Me Quick" hats, Punch and Judy shows on the beach. Only the weather is unreliable.

13
Why I’m Not Looking to Hire Computer-Science Majors

I usually say the hardest part of running a tech startup is raising money, but that’s a bit of a smokescreen: We spend the money on software developers, who are an incredibly hot commodity in scarce supply. Finding them is the toughest task.

14
NASA Just Sealed Six People In a Dome For a Year to Practice Mars

Life on Mars may sound glamorous, but in reality it’s going to mean a lot of time crammed in a small bubble with a few other humans. This could end very badly. So to practice, NASA has taken to sticking people in domes and keeping them isolated for months on end.

15
Amazon is now developing a Galaxy Quest TV series

By Grabthar's hammer,  Galaxy Quest is heading to Amazon.  According to Entertainment Weekly , the new series based on the 1999 sci-fi cult classic is in development at Amazon Studios. The project is currently in its earliest stages, and a pilot hasn't yet been announced. However, the news should certainly excite fans of the original film.

16
https://wtvox.com/robotics/google-is-working-on-a-new-algorithm-thought-vectors/#.VeJmdkCIaBk.twitter

The researcher told the Guardian that Google is working on a new type of algorithm designed to encode thoughts as sequences of numbers – something he described as “thought vectors”.

17
Why Social Media Marketers Fail to Innovate and What to Do About It

Also to add some thing in superhero like SME , you should be consistent where It’s all about the image and perception. Your brand’s graphic identity plays a key role in establishing perception.I liked it its a very Nice pic of SME on mobile phone and tablets :), can i ask you some Q , Well said that now time is changing on Pinterest and Instagram.Do you certinaly belive that Ello will do the same like Pinterest or any other social media ?

18
5 crazy predictions for why Apple's iPhone event needs a huge venue

The Apple Store has gone through some transitions over the last year or so — with new packaging, new store layouts and a slightly different focus on product. Why not create a concept store in the middle of a venue to show the press and analysts how Apple is engaging with customers worldwide?

19
A look inside Google's new OnHub wireless router

Firstly, the whole set-up process is done through a dedicated OnHub mobile app (iOS or Android); SSID and password can be retrieved and/or shared with others at any point by simply tapping on "reveal password." The OnHub app also tells you how many devices are connected to the Wi-Fi at any given time, and how much data each device is using. Oh, and you can restart the router from the mobile app, which means no more crawling on the floor / moving entertainment consoles / throwing your back out to reboot a router. Since Google is hyperaware that people tend to believe the company knows everything they do on the internet, it says right inside the app's privacy settings that the router is not tracking the websites you visit.

20
Social is dead: What 146 startup pitches showed me about the next wave of tech companies

Startups are going niche, in both their product and their market. A particular industry may be saturated, but new startups are still finding a way to try to carve out a slice. This means making their initial market smaller but cannibalizing an untapped one (such as a food-delivery service on college campuses delivered by college students who know the area) or focusing on one product like coffee instead of delivering all kinds of food. The hard part with a smaller niche startup will be making the kinds of returns investors expect to see, but Facebook is the example of how niche can be a good thing. It started as a social site for college students and became a global network.

21
Man Therapy says it's manly to take care of your mental health

Dr. Rich Mahogany uses dry humor to break through the stigma and silence around men’s mental health, providing comprehensive information with comedic timing. Addressing topics from suicide to alcohol addiction to depression, Dr. Rich Mahogany keeps the darkest topics light with quippy lines and occasionally expletives. The tactics keeps men engaged, unafraid to address their feelings with the comfort of being in on the joke.

22
The Battle Of The Sexes, Reduced To Pictograms

In East meets West, an old book from Taschen, Beijing-born, Berlin-based designer Yang Liu manages to reduce already reductive stereotypes about the East and the West to pictograms--a playful attempt to show just how stupid they are. These simple, colorful illustrations convey age-old cliches about how Easterners and Westerners behave in the bedroom, the boardroom, and beyond.

23
3D-printed robotic prosthetic wins 2015 UK James Dyson Award - CNET

Because the hand is 3D printed, each one can be modeled specifically for its wearer. The Open Bionics team scans the arm to which the hand is to be fitted and uses that as a basis for the print, scaling the length of the prosthetic as required. The scanning process can be completed within a few minutes.

24
Boeing shows off its portable drone-killing laser

The portable system fits into four large, suitcase-sized boxes, can be deployed in a matter of minutes, and — like the HEL MD — is operated with the help of laptop and an Xbox controller. (Sorry, Sony fans.) Like any laser weapon system, it has an unlimited magazine as long as there's energy to power it — either via generator or battery pack — and the cost-per-shot is incredibly low. Boeing hopes to see these systems deployed in active service within the next couple of years, where they would supplement traditional missile defense systems. "There will be times where it makes sense to use a missile and there will be times where it makes sense to use a laser," Boeing's lasers and optical systems director David DeYoung told Wired .

25
Street fight takes sudden turn when bromance overcomes

is a leading global media company that informs, inspires and entertains the digital generation. Mashable is redefining storytelling by documenting and shaping the digital revolution in a new voice, new formats and cutting-edge technologies to a uniquely dedicated audience of 42 million monthly unique visitors and 24 million social followers.

26
Illumina CEO Jay Flatley Launches Helix to Stoke Consumer Use of Genomic Data | MIT Technology Review

Illumina’s CEO, Jay Flatley, said in an interview that Helix will subsidize the cost of decoding people’s genomes in hopes of spurring the creation of consumer apps that will draw on the DNA data repeatedly. “You saw what happened with the Apple app store: it just unleashed the consumer side because apps are so cheap to make,” says Flatley, who will be chairman of the new company.

27
The Chinese super-rich are about to flood the US real-estate market

"Where they are buying will also be different. The investor will buy in higher-tier neighborhoods, such as New York or Los Angeles," she said.

28
7 Things Really Amazing Communicators Do

Next to boring lectures and overbearing shouting, I find the most frustrating communication to be where I have to carry the entire conversation. Amazing communicators know how to give and take in a reciprocal manner. Not only do they initiate conversation, they help drive the direction and encourage others to take part. They often mirror by repeating others' comments, concerns and feelings in a manner that shows understanding and interest. To be an amazing communicator, you should be well informed and yet ready to learn , listen and participate.

29
Plus-size women are using exercise as activism, and it's glorious

For plus-size women, exercising despite being explicitly unwelcome is a revolutionary act. Though Roz’s professional fitness career was not motivated by this type of activism, she says she’s humbled when people see her engaging in exercise and realize their plus-size bodies can too exist in the fitness realm.

30
These world maps show how the most popular web browsers have battled for dominance since 2008

But as these maps, created by Jody Sieradzki at Dadaviz show, there's only so long you can prop up a product that most people despise. These maps show the change in popularity of internet browsers from 2008 to '15, as Chrome, Firefox, and Internet Explorer fought to see who would emerge as the web browser of the future.

31
Twelve Tomorrows

Virgil Finlay (1914-1971) was the most accomplished line artist in American science fiction and fantasy history. He began illustrating stories for Weird Tales (1936) and eventually worked for almost every SF magazine: Amazing, Fantastic Universe, IF, Galaxy, Famous Fantastic Mysteries, etc. For awhile he was a staff artist at The American Weekly. 2500 pieces have been catalogued. 1953, he won the Hugo Award for Best Interior Illustrator. He was awarded the Retro Hugo as Best Professional Artist of 1939 and 1945. Finlay has been posthumously inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame (2012) and the Society of Illustrators’ Hall of Fame (2015). Photo: 1933 Self portrait: Copyright © Lail Finlay.

32
Quantum ‘spookiness’ passes toughest test yet

Quantum mechanics prohibits FTL communication. In fact the quantum bound S <= 2 sqrt 2 seems intimately connected with relativistic causality. (The Delft experimenters observed S = 2.4). From Alice's measurement results, Alice can't see what Bob is doing. She can't learn anything about Bob's activities at all. And if Bob were to send one bit of information about what he is doing to Alice per trial of this experiment, then Alice doesn't actually learn, on average, more than one bit of information about what is going on on Bob's side. This is called "information causality", Pawlowski et al. (2009), Nature http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v461/n7267/full/nature08400.html The point of Bell's theorem is that *if* there would be something classical going on behind the scenes of quantum mechanics, then there would be FTL communication "behind the scenes" but so cleverly hidden that you can't do anything with it ... except win the Bell game ie violate CHSH. And you can only do that by the pure randomness of the outcomes. "Nature produces chance events (irreducibly chance-like!) which can occur at widely removed spatial locations without anything propagating from point to point along any path joining those locations.

33
World's tallest man makes massive NBA player look like a pipsqueak

The tallest man in officially recorded history is Robert Wadlow, an 8-foot-11 American who died at age 22 in 1940. The tallest NBA player ever is actually a tie — Manute Bol and Gheorghe Muresan both stood 7-foot-7 during their playing days. But even that would appear average height standing next to Kosen.

34
How To Talk About Your Skills Without Sounding Like A Show-Off

Thanks largely to social media, the ubiquitous humblebragging is often the way people show off their successes today. Just take a scroll through your Facebook feed and you'll find examples everywhere of people talking themselves up. And it’s not just the average person who does it; even the most successful people humblebrag.

35
Five open source Big Data projects to watch | ZDNet

Where's Hadoop going? If this small sampling of some of the many Big Data open source projects out there shows anything, it's that Hadoop isn't merely like a city, but rather a major metropolitan area. It has its suburbs, where its mayor has no jurisdiction, and where political beliefs may differ from those in the center of town. But it has its core character and it must be treated as a market in its own right. Practitioners have to approach "greater" Hadoop, not just the core project itself, or they risk missing trends in its adoption and evolution.

36
Y Combinator startups have raised $7B with a $65B total valuation; 8 are $1B unicorns

Y Combinator (YC), the Silicon Valley-based startup accelerator and seed fund, has answered a question it says it gets asked a lot: What is the fundraising and valuation status of all  startups that have come through its doors?

37
Why It’s Hard to Sue the NSA: You Have to Prove It Spied on You

That’s the Catch-22 that an appeals court served up Friday to plaintiffs who for the last two years have been attacking the NSA’s metadata collection program authorized under section 215 of the Patriot Act. The plaintiffs are led by constitutional lawyer and conservative activist Larry Klayman, who had sued the Obama administration for violating his fourth amendment privacy rights. In 2013, a lower court granted his request for an injunction to stop the NSA’s spying on his data. But the Obama administration appealed that ruling, and an appellate court has now thrown out that injunction based on a familiar and vexing problem for those who sue the government’s secret spying apparatus: The plaintiffs couldn’t sufficiently prove that the NSA secretly spied on them.

38
Supermoons Are Super Dumb

The problem here begins with us, your humble media—specifically those of us in the blogging camp. Bloggers have story quotas to fill and page view expectations to meet. And sometimes, there just isn't anything going on. But editors don't want to hear that. No, bloggers are compelled to latch on to any shred of content and—in pursuit of gaining as many eyeballs as possible—sex up the story as much as possible.

39
How To Stop Networking And Build Real Relationships

Stay real instead, and build friendships. Too many people are afraid to mix their business lives with their personal lives, and I think that’s sad. That came to me once when I was talking with Jean and Georges, who’d worked together for years, and I realized they barely knew anything about each other. They’d never been in each other’s homes, and they didn’t know anything about each other’s spouses or children. What a waste. Don’t be afraid of real human relationships. They matter.

40
Eight common myths that make the US justice system seem fairer than it is

Guilty pleas are proof of guilt. Many people, including judges, take comfort in knowing that an overwhelming number of criminal cases are resolved by guilty plea rather than trial. Whatever imperfections there may be in the trial and criminal charging process, they believe, are washed away by the fact that the defendant ultimately consents to a conviction. But this fails to take into account the trend of bringing multiple counts for a single incident—thereby vastly increasing the risk of a life-shattering sentence in case of conviction—as well as the creativity of prosecutors in hatching up criminal cases where no crime exists and the overcriminalization of virtually every aspect of American life. It also ignores that many defendants cannot, as a practical matter, tell their side of the story at trial because they fear being impeached with prior convictions or other misconduct.

41
Sony Xperia Z5 release date, news and rumors

In fact, it's something Sony's rivals have almost all introduced now so it may be time do it. Each fingerprint sensor has started off pretty rubbish on the first phone though so if history has taught us anything it's not to expect a kickass version this time.

42
How I hacked online dating

Amy Webb was having no luck with online dating. The dates she liked didn't write her back, and her own profile attracted crickets (and worse). So, as any fan of data would do: she started making a spreadsheet. Hear the story of how she went on to hack her online dating life — with frustrating, funny and life-changing results.

43
How McLaren uses F1 tech to make every other industry better.

That day, Glover and his team met Geoff McGrath of McLaren Applied Technologies, a company set up in 2004 by Dennis to apply Formula 1’s high-performance culture and working methods to businesses such as GlaxoSmithKline. McLaren’s headquarters is the 57,000-square-meter Foster + Partners-designed McLaren Technology Centre, which embodies the ethos of one of the oldest and most successful teams in the history of Formula 1 racing. Its glass-fronted main building combines with an artificial lake to form a yin-yang shape. The roof is self-cleaning, using a drainage system to collect rainwater and refill a lake which, in turn, helps regulate the internal temperature. The building is connected to the nearby production center, where McLaren Automotive makes its luxury sports cars. Technicians in lab coats and gloves carefully assemble F1 cars in pristine workshops. All desks are free of clutter, food and drink, according to strict rules imposed by Dennis that also forbid exposed pipes and cables anywhere in the complex.

44
Goat Simulator - IGN's Free Game of the Month

MILLIONS OF BUGS! We're only eliminating the crash-bugs, everything else is hilarious and we're keeping it

45
2016 BMW 7 Series overwhelms with tech and opulence

In case you're worried about taking your hands off the wheel to perform these gestures, don't, because the 2016 7 Series can now steer for itself -- for a limited time, at least. A pair of cameras nestled behind the rear-view mirror watch the road ahead and, when the painted lines on the road are visible, the car will make sure that it stays within them. You can take your hands off the wheel and the car will drive itself, meandering slightly between the lines as it goes, but never crossing them.

46
Apple, Boeing, MIT, and more partner with Pentagon to improve flexible electronics

A consortium of top tech companies, laboratories, and universities is partnering with the Department of Defense to improve the manufacturing of flexible electronics, which could one day end up in aircraft, health monitors, military tools, or consumer electronics like wearables. The department is awarding the consortium, known as the FlexTech Alliance, $75 million over five years, with other sources, including universities, non-profits, and state and local governments, contributing an additional $96 million.

47
Address me as a journalist, don't wolf whistle in my inbox

This morning a I received a pitch from a company inviting me to try out a new gadget. This isn’t uncommon, tech journalists get dozens of these emails every hour.

48
This DIY Audio Jack Key Holder Lets You Plug In Your Keys for Safe Keeping

You don’t have to be an audiophile to appreciate this DIY audio jack key holder, but it certainly helps. Mounted on your wall, you’ll always have a place to plug in your keys when you get home—and you’ll know where to find it. It’s easy to build, too.

49
Unilever Makes Like A Tree, And Leaves The Forest For The Streets

Leading up to the high-profile meeting of world leaders, Unilever is hoping to raise awareness of deforestation, one global warming's primary culprits. The global corporation, home to brands like Dove, Lipton, Ben & Jerry's, and many more, has created a new ad to bring what many perceive to be a faraway problem into the context of our everyday lives.

50
Aerial images show Hurricane Katrina's effect on New Orleans

In the final days of August 2005, Hurricane Katrina ravaged America's southern shores. In one of the greatest natural disasters in this country, more than 1,100 lives were lost and parts of New Orleans were destroyed. The hurricane displaced more than one million people and damaged more than a million homes.

51 The taking of Raqqa by the Islamic State (in Arabic)
52 Microsoft's Cortana On Android: It's Almost As Good (And Creepy) As Google Now
53 Fall 2015 TV Preview - IGN
54 Microsoft: More than 75 million devices now running Windows 10 | ZDNet
55 Ashley Madison hack reveals the states where people cheat the most
56 Subatomic particles that appear to defy Standard Model points to undiscovered forces
57 Wikileaks founder Julian Assange claims he'll be killed by CIA DRONE if he leaves embassy
58 ​Formula 1 racing: Sensors, data, speed, and the Internet of Things | ZDNet
59 Uber will partner with University of Arizona for self-driving car research
60 Bangladesh's child bride problem
61 UTF-8 – “The most elegant hack”
62 We know female executives lose out on pay — and now we know how
63 Infographic: The Ultimate Burning Man Shopping List, Courtesy Of . . . Home Depot
64 Ilse Crawford's Back-To-The-Land Line for Ikea
65 Google Rolls Out Personalized Storm-Tracking Information In Search Results
66 From Galileo to Google: How Big Data Illuminates Human Culture
67 3 Good Ideas In The Long Overdue Redesign Of Salesforce
68 This "Leather" Purse Didn't Kill A Cow--It's Made From Fruit
69 Shell 'art' made 300,000 years before humans evolved | Empeopled
70 How to become the next minor reality celeb: ask for retweets
71 How much should we trust tech companies?
72 Siri plays coy about iPhone 6S launch
73 9 all-purpose, super-easy online Web builders let you tell a story or sell your stuff
74 Gavin Andresen on Why Bitcoin Will Become Unreliable Next Year Without an Urgent Fix | MIT Technology Review
75 As Amazon embraces booze, here are 7 more alcohol delivery services you should know
76 Reg Saddler on Twitter
77 Facebook sets user record as more than 1bn people log on in single day
78 Citizen Mars: the story of five people and a one way trip to the Red Planet
79 Can You Combat Burnout?
80 flyjs/fly
81 10 usability considerations for your mobile app
82 The Sleeper
83 Marc Lewis: the neuroscientist who believes addiction is not a disease
84 Space Photos of the Week: A Nebula Becomes a Butterfly
85 Big Data and the Future of Business - OpenMind
86 Fallout Shelter tips and tricks
87 Watch The Swirling Islands Of Plastic Trash That Are Filling Up Our Oceans
88 ​Biometrics: The password you cannot change | ZDNet
89 The Sentry Will Expose Who's Illegally Profiting From Africa's Deadly Wars
90 Galaxy Note 5 Beats iPhone 6 Plus In Controversial Camera Test
91 Watch: Philippe Starck Explains Why He Doesn't Believe In Underwear
92 More people play fantasy football than live in the 18 least populated states combined
93 Sprint takes aim at AT&T, offers a year of free service to DirecTV customers
94 ​Securing the Internet: Let's Encrypt to release first security certificates September 7 | ZDNet
95 Introducing @TNWstyle: Exploring the way we write about tech
96 Mark Zuckerberg’s year of books: Matt Ridley’s Genome
97 The Beauty of Summer Science
98 Ten ways the Samsung Galaxy Note 5 excels for business use | ZDNet
99 The American Computer and Robotics Museum: A gem in the Treasure State | ZDNet
100 Good news: Samsung Galaxy Note 5 might be coming to the UK