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iPhone message prank crashes phones with a single text

A three character-long text message can temporarily disable iPhones, a hacker has shown.

France creates a special visa for entrepreneurs, engineers and investors

Just in time before the 2017 presidential election in France, the current French government wanted to announce one last thing to foster French startups. The..

This short film about a teenage mother is pure 'heartbreak'

From heartbreak comes hope.

Today in Apple history: Remember Franklin's Apple II clone? | Cult of Mac

On January 18, 1983, Franklin Electronic Publishers announced the Franklin Ace 1200, one of several Apple II clones the company made.

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Top News
1
Tesla will also make Model 3 motors at its Nevada Gigafactory

"We consider [the factory] to be a product. The factory itself is the machine that builds the machine," Tesla CEO Elon Musk said last July. "It actually deserves more attention from creative problem solving engineers than the product that it makes." Creative problem solving was also evident in the deals made between Tesla and Nevada that underpinned the factory’s creation. The automaker agreed to create some 6,500 jobs in the state and in return received an incentives package (including job credits and cuts to sales and property tax) of at least $1.3 billion .

2
No network? No problem: Google now saves your mobile searches for when you’re back online

If you’re running the most up-to-date version of the Google search app for Android you should have access to this feature right now. There’s no word just yet on when or if it will come to iOS devices. 

3
Amid Uber Eats, Amazon Expansion, Deliveroo Expands Workforce

Deliveroo , a London-based maker of an app for ordering take-out food, plans to hire 300 more technology workers as it seeks to take on rivals in an increasingly competitive sector.

4
The Morning After: Wednesday, January 18 2017

Yes, some have tried to do AAA game streaming before, but LiquidSky CEO Ian McLoughlin says his company will be the first to do it right. As he tells Jessica Conditt, advanced technology that runs virtual PCs on cloud servers combined with a business model that allows for free access will make this different from OnLive, Gaikai or GeForce Now. After two years of testing, LiquidSky will open to the public in late February -- we hope it's ready.

5
11 WhatsApp features you'll wish you knew all along

Popular chat app WhatsApp is full of hidden features, we uncover 11 of them to help you out.

6
The fastest way to go from total newbie to programming pro is this Coding 101 training

At the rate the tech world spins, it may feel like everybody knows how to code a webpage or an app except you. Not true…but it’s never too late to put yourself on the right side of the coding knowledge equation, thanks to instruction like this in-depth

7
Amazon is working on self-driving cars

The e-commerce giant's interest in autonomous vehicles was revealed when the company was granted a patent on how self-driving cars could deal with reversible lanes, reports the Guardian .

8
For-Profit College Says Former Admin Demanded $200,000 to Reset School Password

According to a lawsuit by the online American College of Education (ACE), a former employee effectively held the company’s email system hostage after he was fired last spring, locking the for-profit college out and asking for $200,000 before he would help it get back in.

9
Mossberg: Lousy ads are ruining the online experience

Last Saturday, as the New England Patriots were sloppily beating the Houston Texans 34–16 in a playoff game, I wanted to look at the highlight video of a play using the NFL app on my iPad. To watch that 14-second clip, I had to suffer through a 30-second ad for something so irrelevant to me that I can’t even recall what it was.

10
Bitcoin tests resistance

Then, nearly a week later, China announced  it had begun investigating bitcoin exchanges  in Beijing and Shanghai on suspicion of market manipulation, money laundering, unauthorized financing, and other issues. When the dust settled bitcoin had lost  35% of its value in a handful of days.  The price bottomed out after finding support in the $750/$800 area and has managed to fight its way back to the current resistance level.

11
Google Will Save Offline Searches, Find Results When You Get Service Again

Android: When your phone loses service, Google search becomes useless. The company wants to fix that. Now, if you make a search while you’re away from an internet connection, your phone will save the search and try again when you regain service.

12
Trump tweets at wrong Ivanka, gets lesson on climate change

President-elect Donald Trump took to Twitter overnight to praise his daughter Ivanka. As it turned out, he mentioned the wrong Ivanka, who in turn tried to school the incoming leader of the free world on climate change.

13
Obama just freed whistleblower Chelsea Manning

The document dump put Wikileaks and Julian Assange on the map, and landed Manning in the US Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth in 2013 to serve a 35 year sentence. In the three years that followed, Americans are no more united on whether Manning should be protected as a whistleblower, or left to serve the remaining 32 years on her sentence.

14
Gabe Newell says new Valve game is coming, doesn't rule out Half-Life 3

…we prefer to communicate through our products. We are all pretty devoted to reading and listening to the community – everyone here believes it is an integral part of their job to do so. And when it comes time to respond, we generally use Steam – shipping updates that address issues or add functionality. Obviously this doesn’t work for everything. Working this way imposes latency on our communication – it takes longer to ship and update than to do a blog post. This can lead to the feeling of an echo chamber, where it seems like Valve isn’t listening. We’re always listening. So sometimes the latency is rough for everyone, including us when we want to address issues quickly. On balance we think it’s usually worth the trade-off.

15
Yahoo Japan is refusing to stop the sale of ivory on its website

Aside from having its brand above the door, Yahoo has a 35.6 percent stake in Yahoo Japan, second only to the 36.4 percent owned by the Softbank Group controlled by billionaire businessman Masayoshi Son. (In Japan shareholders that own more than a third of a company's stock has the right to veto board decisions.)

16
Google is reportedly bringing Android One phones to the US

When we tried Android One phones in India back in 2014, they were underpowered and featured dated design and poor cameras, making them a poor choice for anyone who wanted a phone to stick with for a couple of years. Hopefully, Google will be able to push hardware makers to come up with devices that can hold their own against the competition when they hit store shelves.

17
Twitter loops all videos under 6.5 seconds as Vine shrivels into a camera

Twitter itself will take Vine’s place as a social network for short videos. To prep for tomorrow’s Vine shutdown and rebirth as Vine Camera, Twitter now automatically loops all videos shorter than 6.5 seconds. That’s not just clips posted from Vine Camera, but any tiny video, including ones saved from other apps like Snapchat.

18
Microsoft to add ebook store to Windows 10

Microsoft is reportedly planning to bring ebooks to the Windows Store. MSPoweruser reports that the new ebooks store will be integrated into the regular Windows Store alongside apps, games, music, TV shows, and movies. It appears Windows 10 users will be able to purchase books from a wide range of authors and publishers, and read them within Microsoft Edge.

19
Meet Viki, Nokia's new hire for their AI personal assistant

Personal assistants are still in the early stages of development, most mobile users do not actively engage with Siri or Google Now on a regular basis. For Viki to make its mark, it would need to be an invaluable service to the consumer, something that changes their mobile behavior and makes them want to chat to a bot.

20
Japanese high-tech toilets standardise icons to help confused tourists

Further ReadingJapan’s PM emerges from green pipe dressed as Mario, accepts Olympic torch Ahead of the forthcoming Tokyo Olympics in 2020, however, with a massive influx of tourists and their bowel movements expected in the country, the manufacturers have reached a consensus. At a press conference on Tuesday, representatives from the nine companies that make up Japan's Sanitary Equipment Industry Association unveiled eight new symbols to accompany the various key functions for each new loo. Models released from April this year will all be standardised, and the manufacturers hope it might even become an international standard.

21
Is your smart city in danger of of succumbing to paranoid insanity?

Though Sci-Fi has long explored robots struggling with human emotions, technology experts now warn that smart cities are evolving into vast artificial organisms that may soon have psychological issues of their own.

22
LG will reportedly be the first to debut Android Wear 2.0 smartwatches

The company is expected to launch the LG Watch Sport and LG Watch Style at an event on February 9 and kick off sales the next day in the US, followed by other countries over the next two months.

23
These Secret Netflix Codes Can Reveal Tons of Hidden Categories

Netflix has tons of great content, but it can be hard to find it all if you don’t know what you’re looking for. The site’s algorithms show you what it thinks you want to watch, but these codes can help you venture outside the suggested depths.

24
Trouva brings UK boutiques online

How do local boutiques compete with the Amazons of the world? The easy answer is they don’t. When you shop for quality and design over cheap and easy, it’s a different market entirely. But the popularity of online retail has created a need for boutiques to have a presence online. London startup  Trouva  is helping small boutiques open up their customer base to the global community. The TechCrunch video team visited Aida in Shoreditch, London to learn more about how the process works.

25
EE mobile firm fined £2.7m for overcharging customers - BBC News

The regulator found the mobile operator had misled more than 10,000 pay-as-you-go customers, charging them for top-up credit but "providing nothing in return", and had broken the rules on handling customer complaints.

26
Galileo satellites experiencing multiple clock failures - BBC News

The onboard atomic clocks that drive the satellite-navigation signals on Europe's Galileo network have been failing at an alarming rate.

27
Mastercard's latest mobile effort: Helping farmers sell direct, no shady middlemen | ZDNet

Instead of having to go through sometimes unscrupulous middlemen, East African farmers can now sell direct using Mastercard's 2KUZE mobile marketplace.

28
https://yro.slashdot.org/story/17/01/18/0527225/dutch-developer-added-backdoor-to-websites-he-built-phished-over-20000-users?utm_source=slashdot&utm_medium=twitter

A Dutch developer illegally accessed the accounts of over 20,000 users after he allegedly collected their login information via backdoors installed on websites he built. According to an official statement , Dutch police officials are now in the process of notifying these victims about the crook's actions. The hacker, yet to be named by Dutch authorities, was arrested on July 11, 2016, at a hotel in Zwolle, the Netherlands, and police proceeded to raid two houses the crook owned, in Leeuwarden and Sneek. According to Dutch police, the 35-years-old suspect was hired to build e-commerce sites for various companies. After doing his job, the developer also left backdoors in those websites, which he used to install various scripts that allowed him to collect information on the site's users. Police say that it's impossible to determine the full breadth of his hacking campaign, but evidence found on his laptop revealed he gained access to over 20,000 email accounts. Authorities say the hacker used his access to these accounts to read people's private email conversations, access their social media profiles, sign-up for gambling sites with the victim's credentials, and access online shopping sites to make purchases for himself using the victim's funds.

29
Forgotten audio formats: Stereo 8 (also known as 8-track)

This was aimed squarely at the pro-radio market, and was based on a quarter-inch two-track format running at "broadcast speed," or 7.5 inches per second (ips). One of the tracks was mono, for broadcast, the other was a cue track. A later version used three tracks, two for stereo broadcast and one for cuing. But rarely were even the shortest radio programmes broadcast like this, as the Fidelipac—and its various bastard children—were usually used for background music, jingles, stings, and adverts. The most popular version was "size A," a four-inch wide package that had a maximum playing time of just over 10 minutes at 7.5ips. Its professional radio use continued—sometimes with 15ips versions, sometimes with the humbler Stereo 8 carts—well into the '90s. Here’s a recording of a Cart being used as a potential weapon (at 17:19) in 1980s' radio sitcom WKRP In Cincinnati :

30
Obama shortens sentence of Manning, who gave secrets to WikiLeaks

WASHINGTON President Barack Obama on Tuesday shortened the prison sentence of Chelsea Manning, the former U.S. military intelligence analyst who was responsible for a 2010 leak of classified materials to anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks, the biggest such breach in U.S. history.

31
https://news.slashdot.org/story/17/01/18/0141251/low-cost-android-one-phones-coming-to-the-us-says-report?utm_source=slashdot&utm_medium=twitter

Android One phones have historically been produced by companies you probably haven't heard of, like Micromax, Cherry, and QMobile. Originally Google had a direct hand in detailing what components would go into the phone, but apparently became more flexible over time and eventually expanded the program beyond India to parts of Africa , Spain, and Portugal . Android One may not have been the rousing worldwide success Google was hoping for, but it's still an important initiative for the company. Especially at the low end, there's a lot of incentive for manufacturers to pile on extra software in a bid to make those devices more profitable -- but that could cut against Google's efforts to make its own services more pervasive and popular. If Google really does put some real effort behind Android One, it could make its plans for Android a little clearer. Google itself has taken a stand that it wants to make its own hardware at the high-end of the smartphone market with the Pixel, and if The Information's report is accurate, it wants to ensure that its services are not cut out from the low end.

32
TechCrunch on Twitter

Theranos closes its last remaining blood-testing lab after it reportedly failed an inspection http://tcrn.ch/2jIQbW6  pic.twitter.com/KL5Rqq4xQT

33
Obamacare repeal could hurt the gig economy

Fiverr is part of the gig economy, which is another way of describing freelance, independent or contract workers enabled by applications and online platforms. It has about two million buyers and sellers worldwide, about half of whom are in the U.S. People use the platform to provide and to buy a range of digital services that include programming, development, graphics design, animation and video work.

34
Surprise: Google is still tinkering with Google+

Sometimes you’re so deeply invested in a project that even when it’s just not working you can’t stop fiddling, telling yourself: “If I just change this one thing maybe it’ll all be fine.” So seems to be the situation with Google and Google+, the company’s also-ran social network.

35
Federal Trade Commission Files Antitrust Lawsuit Against Qualcomm

WASHINGTON—The Federal Trade Commission on Tuesday sued Qualcomm Inc., alleging the semiconductor company engaged in unlawful tactics to maintain a monopoly on a type of chip used in cellphones.

36
Continuous Delivery in the Enterprise - TechRepublic

To leverage Continuous Delivery, enterprises must consider impacts that span functional silos, as well as applications that touch older, slower moving components. Managing the many dependencies can cause slowdowns. See how to achieve continuous delivery in the enterprise.

37
Are Squirrels a Bigger Threat to the Power Grid Than Cyberattack? Yes and No

What the animal-based outages also demonstrate, though, is the larger power grid’s resilience. “There’s a lot of rhetoric about how fragile things are, how susceptible to cascading failures. And yet since 2000, there have only been two large-scale blackouts in the country,” Thomas says, referring to the 2011 Northeast and 2013 Southwest blackouts that each left millions without electricity. “In both of those cases, power was restored in less than 24 hours for the majority of people impacted.” Ukraine, too, Thomas notes, was back online after a few hours.

38
Assange “stands by” US extradition “deal,” Swedes still want to quiz him over rape claim

Assange has been holed up in cramped conditions at the Ecuadorian embassy in London since June 2012. He skipped bail after a European Arrest Warrant was issued in late 2010 by Scotland Yard cops on behalf of Swedish officials who sought the extradition of the 45-year-old Australian.

39
Toshiba mulls chips business stake sale to Western Digital - source

Toshiba does not have many options to offset the impact of this writedown that could wipe out its shareholders' equity. Given the fact the firm is on the Tokyo Stock Exchange's watchlist, it is impossible for it to raise funds from financial markets. The spin-off of its profitable but capital-intensive chip business and a stake sale are perhaps the only ways out.

40
Nintendo Uses Japan Display as Sole Screen-Panel Supplier for Switch

TOKYO—If Nintendo Co. finds success with its videogame console, Switch, it could brighten the future not only of Nintendo but also of Japan Display Inc., a struggling display maker that won the contract to make the Switch’s screens. People familiar with the matter said Nintendo picked Japan Display as the exclusive supplier of the Switch’s 6.2-inch touch-sensitive liquid-crystal display. The Switch, which can be used both as a...

41
At last! Makers of Japan’s high-tech toilets will unify symbols for foreign tourists

Yes, pressing a button on a Japanese toilet without full knowledge of its function can be a little nerve-wracking at first, especially with all those mysterious noises coming from the bowl as the machinery springs to life. Indeed, if you’re fresh off the plane, the words “brace, brace, brace” could well pop into your head as you press a button and wait to learn how your undercarriage will be dealt with by Japanese technology for the very first time in your life.

42
Gravity Waves Might Be Lighting Up Venus’ Atmosphere

Prior to this study, scientists didn’t believe that gravity waves could propagate this high up into the atmosphere, thinking they’d be confined to the lower atmosphere. And the exact hows and whys of these bow structures are still elusive. (Not to mention a sample size of about 15 is pretty dang small.) “It can’t be as simple as surface winds flowing over mountains, because the feature has been seen only in the late afternoon on Venus,” says Gerald Schubert, a geophysicist at UCLA. Why time of day would make giant vertical gravity waves more or less likely is anybody’s guess: “That’s what we have to answer in the next step of the study,” Taguchi says.

43
Bangkok will hold its first gay pride parade in 11 years

Bangkok will hold its first gay pride parade later this year, a long 11 years after its last.

44
Parker Molloy on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

45
The 10 best stock pickers that you should have listened to in 2016

Matson’s most profitable recommendation of 2016 (with a three-month profit of 72.7%) was for molecular diagnostic testing company GenMark on April 19. He has subsequently reiterated his buy rating twice — most recently on July 29 after the European clearance and launch of GNMK’s sample-to-answer ePlex system. At the end of last year, GenMark submitted ePlex to the FDA for clearance.

46
Fast Trader Pulled a Fast One on Some Customers

For example, if CES was handling a marketable order to buy shares, and the SIP NBO was $10.01, and the best offer from one or more of the depth of book feeds was $10.02, SmartProvide would send a buy order to be displayed in the market at a price less than $10.01, such as $10.00. This order would be displayed for up to one to five seconds, depending on the size of the order. If this order received an execution, the customer order would benefit from the execution at the better price (i.e., the shares purchased by the customer would be at a price at least one penny better than the NBO). This occurred for approximately 18% of the shares handled by SmartProvide. If the order did not receive a full execution from this routing, CES’s algorithms reassessed the handling of the remaining shares, and could either internalize or seek to obtain an execution in the market.

47
Audi just announced a slew of electrified vehicles for China — here's a glimpse of the cars to come

On Tuesday, the Volkswagen subsidiary said it has teamed up with its local manufacturing partner FAW to introduce a series of electrified vehicles as part of a 10-year plan to expand in China. As part of the plan, the company has committed to rolling out five new electrified vehicles in China by 2022.

48
India promises 'open mind' when looking at Apple demands for local manufacturing

The Indian government will adopt an "open mind" when examing Apple's demands before setting up local manufacturing in the country, the country's Information Technology Minister said on Wednesday.

49
Ford patents a car camera system to get you the best shots for social media

Ford has a new patent out for a vehicle camera system – but it’s not designed for use in autonomous cars, as you might imagine. Instead, it’s a vehicle-mounted camera concept that would use data fed by the vehicle itself about its speed, trajectory and more to determine how to best position themselves to get the best shots.

50
Would you live stream a dinner date to the whole world?

Kaitlyn Tiffany: Last Friday, Lizzie, The Verge staff photographer Amelia Krales, and I had a really special night on the town on the edge of Park Slope in a voodoo-themed bistro. Specifically, the voodoo-themed bistro was called Live on Air and it was also a live-streaming-themed bistro inspired by the 1998 Jim Carrey film The Truman Show . For some background, that’s a film about a man who doesn’t know his entire life and world is just a facade constructed for the purpose of a popular 24-hour live stream television program. It’s a psychological horror film, but Live on Air is just a moderately pleasant restaurant where you’re perfectly aware you’re being filmed so it’s fine.

51 OPAQ Networks Launches Security-as-a-Service Platform, Raises $21M
52 How to simplify your Debian/Ubuntu system updates with uCareSystem - TechRepublic
53 Do We Need an International Body to Regulate Genetic Engineering?
54 One country dominates the global bitcoin market
55 Apple released its next big thing and nobody noticed
56 Can Entrepreneurship Revive The Troubled PhD?
57 Tim Cook's impressive career in 90 seconds | Cult of Mac
58 Azure HDInsight: Get cloud-based Hadoop up and running today | ZDNet
59 Audio books are now just a tap away on Sonos speakers
60 This mirror will play music and take your calls, but it won't tell you that you're pretty
61 AT&T Shut Down its 2G Network
62 Report: Google's New Smartwatches Arrive Feb. 9
63 12 million declassified CIA files are now available online
64 768 million people don't have access to clean water.
65 How to the watch the US presidential inauguration
66 These six-wheeled robots are about to start delivering food in the US
67 iPhone turns 10: Why it's still the smartphone to beat - TechRepublic
68 Forbes Tech News on Twitter
69 Postmates and DoorDash are testing delivery by robot with Starship Technologies
70 This program uses AI to build a virtual 3D heart for people and predict how long they'll live
71 Airbus's "Flying Car" Prototype Could Be Ready for Takeoff Within the Year
72 New supply chain reports lend weight to 'wraparound' 5.8-inch 'iPhone 8' with embedded sensors
73 How to Switch From a Mac to a Windows PC Without Losing Your Data
74 Facebook’s VR Foray Derided as ‘Fanciful Story’
75 This simple phishing attack can steal your browser autofill data
76 Mum's blog about son's autism is challenging perceptions one post at a time
77 Tesla to expand Gigafactory production
78 Microsoft's Nadella: How Trump can work with Silicon Valley
79 Why The Most Productive People Do These Six Things Every Day
80 Finally, a social media study that doesn't point the finger at millennials
81 Russia will let Edward Snowden stay for another three years
82 How to stop Facebook from wasting your precious time
83 The smartest watches are still mechanical
84 Japan's most powerful ad agency admitted it carried out almost 1,000 improper transactions — including over-billing its clients
85 Julian Assange Doubles Down on Dumbass Promise to Turn Himself In
86 Reg Saddler on Twitter
87 Here's how you can block nuisance calls on BT
88 How AI Can Help Keep Ocean Fisheries Sustainable
89 Apple Releases Supplemental Security Update for OS X El Capitan 10.11.6
90 Windows 10 tip: Monitor system performance in real time | ZDNet
91 Forward, a $149 per month medical startup, aims to be the Apple Store of doctor’s offices
92 TechRadar on Twitter
93 Trump's health pick set to defend investments at U.S. Senate hearing
94 Verizon turns up the heat in attempt to force Samsung Note 7 returns | ZDNet
95 DMARC Secured Your Email Identity, But See How it Ruined Mailing Lists