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Top 10 Low Pass Flybys of All Time

http://facebook.com/TWISTEDSIFTER - Become a Fan and I'll do a flyby over your home! limited time only! Track is Angel by Massive Attack from the album Mezza...

This is what's happening inside your camera at 10,000 frames per second

The "D" in DSLR does not stand for dark magic. In fact, that snap of the shutter you hear when taking a picture is a wonderful symphony of mechanical engineering at work, and happens so fast that...

NFL's Marshawn Lynch and Rob Gronkowski play 'Mortal Kombat' with Conan

Marshawn Lynch finally speaks ... while he plays video games with Conan O'Brien.

Here's the Super Bowl puppy ad you haven't seen

Super Bowl commercial tropes abound in this ad.

New video purportedly shows ISIS militants beheading Japanese journalist

An online video released Saturday purportedly shows Islamic State (ISIS) militants beheading Japanese journalist Kenji Goto.

SpaceX shows how its heavy-lifting rocket will (hopefully) work

SpaceX's Falcon Heavy has yet to grace a launch pad, but that isn't stopping the company from extolling the reusable rocket's virtues. Elon Musk and cre

McDonald's will be accepting hugs and dance moves as payment

Randomly selected McDonald's customers will have the opportunity to pay for their meals with various tasks between Feb. 2 and Feb. 14.

Google is making fake human skin to test its cancer-detecting nanoparticles

Last October, Google announced that it was working on magnetic nanoparticles that would seek out cancer cells in the bloodstream and report back to a smart wristband. Now, if this didn't sound...

Can super cute puppies save these #brands?

Your company is embroiled in scandal, the stock price is down, and public opinion is turning against you. What do you do? If you're Uber, Budweiser, and Go Daddy then the answer is easy: make a...

Super Bowl will have 30-mile “no drone zone”

Buzzing quarterback Tom Brady with an unmanned aircraft might sound like fun, but anyone who flies a drone remotely near the University of Phoenix stadium, where Super Bowl XLIX is taking place this Sunday, could face big, big trouble from the FAA. On Wednesday, the country’s aviation regulator singled out drones in a fact sheet about Super Bowl–related aircraft activity, saying the…

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1
Snapchat's new original series is called Literally Can't Even

Spielberg and Goldwyn, daughters of Steven Spielberg and John Goldwyn, also wrote the series, which is basically about their own lives: They play friends and writing partners who go through breakups, juice cleanses, and other Los Angeles-esque trials of young adulthood.

2
Uber will fight to keep its Boston ride data private

To protect the data, Uber even agreed to cover Boston’s legal bills if the city is ever sued for access to the information, the agreement states. In instances where judges compel the city to hand over data they deem isn’t a trade secret or confidential, Uber will be notified by the city so it can fight the request in court.

3
A Day in a Life of a Product Manager

In terms of day-to-day tasks, product managers reported engaging in both strategic and tactical work. While likely few product managers write code, they often possess technical skills and need to get their hands dirty. Here’s a look at the percentage of product managers that report participating in the following activities on a daily basis:

4
How augmented reality will change sports ... and build empathy

Chris Kluwe wants to look into the future of sports and think about how technology will help not just players and coaches, but fans. Here the former NFL punter envisions a future in which augmented reality will help people experience sports as if they are directly on the field — and maybe even help them see others in a new light, too.

5
When Exactly Does a Startup Become Mature?

So, I took my notebook and scribbled a couple notes, coming up with a hypothesis that I needed to test. After all, our company, which in two years grew from 10 to 1,600 employees, could no longer be classified as a startup. The growth happened so quickly, it was hard to determine at what point we stopped being a startup. Observing the different forces that direct the growth of the average startup, I came up with the following assumption:

6
January in tech news from Eastern Europe

To make things easier, we’ve put together the most important headlines of the month in a handy round-up.

7
Why thinking you're ugly is bad for you

About 10,000 people a month Google the phrase, “Am I ugly?” Meaghan Ramsey of the Dove Self-Esteem Project has a feeling that many of them are young girls. In a deeply unsettling talk, she walks us through the surprising impacts of low body and image confidence—from lower grade point averages to greater risk-taking with drugs and alcohol. And then shares the key things all of us can do to disrupt this reality.

8
Natural Born Heroes

Georges Hébert was sure of it, and the “Movement of Three” women back him up. Hébert was a French naval officer and the philosopher king of pre-parkour . Back in the early 1900s, Hébert survived a volcano eruption in the Caribbean. Thousands of people died horribly all around him, and Hébert was scarred by the fact that many didn’t have to. They could have run, jumped, climbed, swum, and carried each other to safety—except they’d forgotten how. We’ve let our bodies become stupid, Hébert believed. We used to be really clever on our feet. We knew how to make the world our playground, instinctively creating the most animal-efficient way to fly over, around, and under the hard edges of the landscape the way monkeys tumble through the trees. Herbert went on to develop his own theory of physical education, the “Natural Method,” and helped create obstacle courses to train French marines. But his teachings have largely been forgotten. Years of sitting around have since drained away our savage gusto and brought his second golden age of natural movement to an end—and that was even before we had an app for  Chunky Monkey home delivery .

9
Take "the Other" to lunch

There's an angry divisive tension in the air that threatens to make modern politics impossible. Elizabeth Lesser explores the two sides of human nature within us (call them "the mystic" and "the warrior”) that can be harnessed to elevate the way we treat each other. She shares a simple way to begin real dialogue — by going to lunch with someone who doesn't agree with you, and asking them three questions to find out what's really in their hearts.

10
Why domestic violence victims don't leave

Leslie Morgan Steiner was in “crazy love” — that is, madly in love with a man who routinely abused her and threatened her life. Steiner tells the dark story of her relationship, correcting misconceptions many people hold about victims of domestic violence, and explaining how we can all help break the silence. (Filmed at TEDxRainier.)

11
Are athletes really getting faster, better, stronger?

When you look at sporting achievements over the last decades, it seems like humans have gotten faster, better and stronger in nearly every way. Yet as David Epstein points out in this delightfully counter-intuitive talk, we might want to lay off the self-congratulation. Many factors are at play in shattering athletic records, and the development of our natural talents is just one of them.

12
The FCC has changed the definition of broadband

As part of its 2015 Broadband Progress Report, the Federal Communications Commission has voted to change the definition of broadband by raising the minimum download speeds needed from 4Mbps to 25Mbps, and the minimum upload speed from 1Mbps to 3Mbps, which effectively triples the number of US households without broadband access. Currently, 6.3 percent of US households don’t have access to broadband under the previous 4Mpbs/1Mbps threshold, while another 13.1 percent don't have access to broadband under the new 25Mbps downstream threshold.

13
The opportunity of adversity

The thesaurus might equate "disabled" with synonyms like "useless" and "mutilated," but ground-breaking runner Aimee Mullins is out to redefine the word. Defying these associations, she shows how adversity — in her case, being born without shinbones — actually opens the door for human potential.

14
Tumblr cleans up its interface in an attempt to entice longform writers

Tumblr has begun rolling out new features to make its editor more appealing to longform writers. Over the past two days, the company has announced a new lineup of tools meant to make its interface both simpler to use and nicer to look at.

15
Watch people lose their minds when subjected to the Tesla P85D's 'insane' mode

When Elon Musk first showed off the Model S P85D, Tesla's high-end all-wheel-drive electric car, he said that his company wanted to reach the kind of acceleration achieved by the world's greatest supercars.  With the help of a dash camera , some unsuspecting victims, and the car's ability to accelerate from 0 to 60 MPH in 3.2 seconds, a P85D owner made a super sweary compilation video to show that Tesla was certainly successful in making its newest model shockingly speedy.

16
How reintroducing wolves helped save a famous park

Wolves had been absent from Yellowstone National Park for more than 70 years when they were reintroduced in the 1990s – and their return had some surprising benefits.

17
Chris Dixon on Twitter

Vision is EVERYTHING --> Nikola Tesla predicting today back in 1926... pic.twitter.com/T1d6ALAMQf via @cdixon

18
The Case That Turns Your Phone Into A Polaroid Camera Is Now On Kickstarter

As you can see the in the video above, we bumped into Prynt a few weeks back at CES. They demonstrated their new mount for phones, which will allow the case to support larger phablets like the iPhone 6 Plus and Galaxy Note line down the road. They weren’t showing a case with a direct connection to your phone over Lightning or USB, so print times still haven’t quite hit the 30 seconds the team is aiming for.

19
Study finds nine car models that could save your life

Study finds nine car models that could save your life Nine car models are so safe they had a driver death rate of zero in a new study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Check out this story on USATODAY.com: http://usat.ly/1CHc50G

20
Life lessons from big cats

Beverly + Dereck Joubert live in the bush, filming and photographing lions and leopards in their natural habitat. With stunning footage (some never before seen), they discuss their personal relationships with these majestic animals — and their quest to save the big cats from human threats.

21
CIA and Mossad killed senior Hezbollah figure in car bombing

The United States has never acknowledged participation in the killing of Mughniyah, which Hezbollah blamed on Israel. Until now, there has been little detail about the joint operation by the CIA and Mossad to kill him, how the car bombing was planned or the exact U.S. role. With the exception of the 2011 killing of Osama bin Laden, the mission marked one of the most high-risk covert actions by the United States in recent years.

22
19 Incredibly Impressive Students At Cornell

Cornell's public-affairs office to track down the best and brightest students.

23
50-foot-long 'dragon' dinosaur species discovered in China - CNET

The dragon of Qijiang is thought to have lived about 160 million years ago during the Late Jurassic period, when dinosaurs like the Stegosaurus also roamed Earth. Its unusually long neck hints at the breadth of evolutionary adaptations, says Miyashita.

24
British army creates team of Facebook warriors

The Israel Defence Forces have pioneered state military engagement with social media, with dedicated teams operating since Operation Cast Lead, its war in Gaza in 2008-9. The IDF is active on 30 platforms – including Twitter, Facebook, Youtube and Instagram – in six languages. “It enables us to engage with an audience we otherwise wouldn’t reach,” said an Israeli army spokesman.

25
10,000 Hours with Reid Hoffman: What I Learned

When there’s a complex list of pros and cons driving a potentially expensive action, Reid seeks a single decisive reason to go for it—not a blended reason. For example, we were once discussing whether it’d make sense for him to travel to China. There was the LinkedIn expansion activity in China; some fun intellectual events happening; the launch of The Start-Up of You in Chinese. A variety of possible good reasons to go, but none justified a trip in and of itself. He said, “There needs to be one decisive reason. And then the worthiness of the trip needs to be measured against that one reason. If I go, then we can backfill into the schedule all the other secondary activities. But if I go for a blended reason, I’ll almost surely come back and feel like it was a waste a time.” He did not go on the trip. If you come up with a list of many reasons to do something, Nassim Taleb once wrote, you are trying to convince yourself—if there isn’t one clear reason, don’t do it. (An analogous belief Reid has about consumer internet business models: there’s generally one main business model. Listing a blend of possible revenue streams makes investors nervous.

26
Tom Hanks, Edward Norton, and Brad Pitt are bringing a Lewis and Clark miniseries to HBO

Lewis and Clark tells the story of America’s first contact with the land and native tribes of the country west of the Mississippi River. The miniseries follows the epic journey of the Corps of Discovery and its captains, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, who traverse uncharted territory on a mission to deliver President Jefferson’s message of sovereignty as they search for his fabled all-water route to the Pacific. Lewis and Clark focuses not just on their incredible achievements, but also on the physical, spiritual and emotional toll the expedition takes on them.

27
WIRED on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

28
How To Stop People From Being Able To See That You Read Their Facebook Message

Facebook, however, does not. When you read someone's Facebook message, they'll always know — they can see the time or just the date you read the message, depending on when they look back at it themselves.

29
Microsoft's HoloLens explained: How it works and why it's different - CNET

Has Microsoft suddenly pushed us into the age of "Star Trek" and "Minority Report"? For those confused about what's actually going on with the company's new head-mounted gadget, here's the rundown.

30
The Top 100 Most Social CIOs on Twitter 2015 [SLIDE DECK]

Here is the 2015 edition of the Top 100 Most Social CIOs. The ranking was determined by a combination of factors including twitter list memberships, tweet volume, number of followers, and other metrics as tallied by several social media influence scoring providers. On average, these CIOs are members of 180 lists with an average of 5,650 follower. Regarding the 2015 list, I have excluded several former CIOs who appeared on the 2014 list because they are no longer serving as active CIOs.

31
This headset filters out ads from the real world, will make watching Super Bowl ads awkward

Corporate branding and advertisements are ubiquitous in society today and almost impossible to avoid. What if we lived in a world where consumers were blind to this surplus of corporate branding? Brand Killer is a technology demonstration that envisions a future in which consumers can use augmented reality to opt out of corporate influence. We built a head-mounted display which uses computer vision to recognize and block brands and logos from the user's view in real time. It's AdBlock for Real Life.

32
Lights, camera, Apple: Filming starts for new Steve Jobs biopic - CNET

The film, with a screenplay by Aaron Sorkin and directed by Danny Boyle, has begun shooting in California. Crew members put the finishing touches on the garage set Friday morning in anticipation of shooting later in the day. The venue, in sleepy Los Altos in the heart of Silicon Valley, also happens to be the actual garage at Jobs' childhood home and the location where he and partner Steve Wozniak started Apple in 1976.

33
Moment's new case gives your phone a real shutter button

The Moment Case has an integrated mount for Moment's wide-angle and telephoto lenses released last year , as well as mounting points for neck or wrist straps. It can even determine which of Moment's lenses are attached, sending that information to Moment's app for improved image processing. But the most interesting part of the Moment Case is its two stage shutter button, which works with the app to provide half-press focus locking and full-press shutter release, just like on a traditional camera. Holding the button down will activate burst mode, and Moment says it's working on adding other features such as video in the future. The case communicates with your phone over Bluetooth LE and relies on a button cell battery that Moment expects to last for months before needing to be replaced.

34
The TheTechNewsBlog Daily

The TheTechNewsBlog Daily, by TheTechNewsBlog: updated automatically with a curated selection of articles, blog posts, videos and photos.

35
How to build with clay... and community

Diébédo Francis Kéré knew exactly what he wanted to do when he got his degree in architecture… He wanted to go home to Gando in Burkina Faso, to help his neighbors reap the benefit of his education. In this charming talk, Kéré shows off some of the beautiful structures he's helped to build in his small village in the years since then, including an award-winning primary school made from clay by the entire community.

36
What Andrew Sullivan's exit says about the future of blogging

I am bringing back this blog. My goal is to write one item a day, every weekday, more or less, starting today. Some of the posts will be about Vox Media, in the spirit of increasing the transparency into the editorial side of the company in my role as Editorial Director. But this is not primarily a promotional undertaking, because that would suck. I’ll also blog about restaurants, travel, the South Street Seaport, the great city of Charleston, the great state of Maine, ephemera, nonsense, whatever. My hope is to relearn the practice of daily blogging, which used to be the most effortless thing in the world for me but now feels terrifying.

37
Basically, the world will never be able to top 1980s ski fashion

Actress Charlene Tilton wears matching neon yellow separates. Husband Domenick Allen wears a keyboard scarf, Les Miserables sweater and acid wash jeans. Daughter Cherish Lee wears a visor and soft pink ski suit. They attend the fifth annual Steve Kanaly Invitational Celebrity Ski Classic to Benefit the March of Dimes, Mountain High Ski Area, Wrightwood, California.

38
Hotel Rooms Of Their Own: These 12 Writers Will Sleep At The Ace And Pen Letters To Guests

Atticus Lish was the first author to spend the night at the hotel, but it will remain a surprise when each of the other writers will show up. "The first letter was very funny," Chee says, hardly able to stifle his laughter. "The novel that Atticus wrote was so incredible and dealt with the hardest things in life and this letter was so lighthearted and unexpected. It turns out he is kind of a goofball, which is great."

39
Google Fiber rollout confirmed for Atlanta, Nashville, Charlotte, and Raleigh-Durham

Right on schedule, Google has confirmed the next cities to receive its high-speed Google Fiber gigabit internet and TV service. According to a blog post from the company, 18 cities across four major metropolitan areas — Atlanta, Nashville, Charlotte, and Raleigh-Durham — will be the next to receive Google Fiber. This  matches up with recent reports indicating that these cities, which were already on Google's roadmap as potential future fiber cities, would be officially announced this week. Google also noted that it is continuing to explore options for bringing fiber to Phoenix, Portland, Salt Lake City, San Antonio, and San Jose and would have more updates on those cities this year.

40
Don't buy these phones (roundup) - CNET

We review a lot of phones here at CNET. A lot . A few are standouts, most are decent and affordable, and a very few just aren't worth the trouble, low price be damned. Gathered below is the rogues gallery of recent disappointments that just weren't able to live up to their promise. Arm yourself with the knowledge of the phones you can safely skip, then cheer yourself up with this list of rock stars .

41
Katharine the great white shark tops 10,000 miles

Katharine the great white shark tops 10,000 miles Pinged off Florida coast, shark might be a snowbird. Check out this story on USATODAY.com: http://usat.ly/1CFJCIz

42
Letters of Note: You're off, by God!

June 25, 1973 So My Lumps, You're off, by God! I can barely believe it since I am so unaccustomed to anybody leaving me. But reflectively I wonder why nobody did so before. All I care about—honest to God—is that you are happy and I don't much care who you'll find happiness with. I mean as long as he's a friendly bloke and treats you nice and kind. If he doesn't I'll come at him with a hammer and clinker. God's eye may be on the sparrow but my eye will always be on you. Never forget your strange virtues. Never forget that underneath that veneer of raucous language is a remarkable and puritanical LADY. I am a smashing bore and why you've stuck by me so long is an indication of your loyalty. I shall miss you with passion and wild regret. You may rest assured that I will not have affairs with any other female. I shall gloom a lot and stare morosely into unimaginable distances and act a bit—probably on the stage—to keep me in booze and butter, but chiefly and above all I shall write. Not about you, I hasten to add. No Millerinski Me, with a double M.

43
PCMag on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

44
Amazon Prime Members Spend An Astonishing $1,500 A Year, Survey Says

Those who sign up for the retailer's free-shipping loyalty program spend an average of $1,500 per year buying stuff on Amazon, according to a new report from Chicago-based market research firm Consumer Intelligence Research Partners .

45
It's Apple's fault that the Nexus 6 doesn't have a fingerprint sensor

The decision not to implement a second-rate fingerprint sensor was probably the right one for Motorola and Google. Devices like the HTC One max have shown what the alternative is: a slow and buggy experience that puts users off trying to use the feature at all. Apple's Touch ID fingerprint scanner, on the other hand, is consistently accurate and fast and sits in a more comfortable spot at the front of the device. It might have been nice to see that same functionality in the Nexus 6 as well, but that exclusivity over the best technology in the market is what Apple paid millions of dollars for.

46
BootChess is the tiniest chess program ever written. Wanna play?

Poudade: Could it beat Kasparov? No. Could it beat Turing's original and unmodified 1-ply paper chess ? No, but it could "handle a game" with it surely. Lastly, Kasparov did play against Turing's paper chess augmented to 3-ply and it took him 27 moves to beat the later. He beat it the next game in 7 moves. But as it standing BootCHess doesn't even use a full MinMax play but something I call TaxiMax (please read BootChess.txt in downloaded archive) because of the size constraints. If you can arrange a match with Kasparov (My daughter and I have his chess game) I can have a modified version battle him through 7 moves at least, during the initial first game. But the final point is it is not the best chess game, it is the smallest.

47
What (Some) Silicon Valley Women Think Of Newsweek

Newsweek’s faceless and sexualized symbol of women in tech is a disservice to these women and countless others. It’s basic and reductive. We have worked so hard to broaden the scope of what we can be, in Silicon Valley, in the world, and here comes Newsweek putting us back in the box with an image that bluntly, sloppily trivializes how painfully that progress was won. As writer Carmel DeAmicis pointed out to another reporter who did not get why people were offended by the image, “Imagine you were killed by terrorists. the feature image on story of yr death: Inappropriate, non?”

48
The Neuroscience Of "Harry Potter"

But the study struggles at a more basic level, too. For one thing, most of us associate getting lost in a book with losing perhaps an hour before we know it—four lines just isn't enough space to simulate the experience. Beyond that, the brain activity spotted in this study arguably speaks much more to the type of passage chosen than to the experience of immersion, per se. Nor does a strong reaction to fearful passages say anything about the value of neutral passages; if every passage were fearful, then eventually the fearful becomes the neutral.

49
3 clues to understanding your brain

Vilayanur Ramachandran tells us what brain damage can reveal about the connection between celebral tissue and the mind, using three startling delusions as examples.

50
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51 Facebook Is Now Bigger Than The Largest Country On Earth
52 2014 BMW i3 with range extender review - CNET
53 18 awesome photographers you should be following on Instagram
54 How I fell in love with a fish
55 Where Do Designers Go To Work After College?
56 Dell aims upgraded laptop at Mac-using creative pros - CNET
57 Marvel's Agent Carter Exclusive: Showrunners Reveal Who Dottie Works For - IGN
58 Women In Tech: This Platform Will Match You To Peer Mentors, Tinder-Style
59 16 hearty crockpot recipes to keep you warm
60 Working Remotely Does Not Mean You Should Work From Home
61 Lasers have turned this metal super hydrophobic - CNET
62 How To Put A Stapler In Jello
63 Measuring Brainwaves to Make a New Kind of Bike Map for NYC | WIRED
64 This is Saturn
65 With Dropcam Founder And Technology VP Exits, Nest Restructures Management [Memos]
66 A Nissan Juke on Tank Treads Is as Glorious and Ridiculous as You'd Imagine | WIRED
67 Kick some Hydra butt with Lego's new Marvel playset
68 Chris Pratt Could Be the Next Indiana Jones
69 On a wingsuit and a prayer, flying over the Grand Canyon - CNET
70 Three Reasons Why Your Software Is So Far Behind Schedule
71 A New Startup Is Helping Companies Borrow Wall Street Talent
72 $5.25 million awarded to five Google Lunar XPrize teams with the right stuff - CNET
73 Trivia Crack: The app with 100M players and a game show
74 This App Identifies Your Most Toxic Friends
75 Star Wars Battlefront: Stunning Endor Concept Art Revealed - IGN First - IGN
76 Watch All The Ads From Super Bowl 2015 So Far
77 See NYC Through The Lens Of A 17-Year-Old Stanley Kubrick
78 How to Understand the Super Bowl—With Physics! | WIRED
79 Sign up to join Mashable's live blog of Super Bowl ads
80 Copperfield conjures new tricks from tech
81 We Used iPhone Time-Lapse Video To See How Much An Average 28-Year-Old Man Tosses And Turns In His Sleep
82 10 Must-Have iPhone Apps
83 5 can't-miss apps for Super Bowl Sunday
84 ​Google leaves most Android users exposed to hackers - CNET
85 REVEALED: A Breakdown Of The Demographics For Each Of The Different Social Networks
86 Drag queens in China dazzle in light of acceptance
87 The Genius of MailChimp's Sweaty Monkey Finger
88 Sandstorm.io