Top Videos
Bette Middler calls Justin Bieber's dad a dick after

Bette Middler scolds Justin Bieber's dad for not being there for his son.

Why police could seize a college student's life savings without charging him for a crime

Meet Charles Clarke.

Voltmeter Clock

This clock tells the time - hours, mins, and seconds using 3 analogue voltmeters. A PIC16F628A microcontroller is used to display the time by varying the voltage to each voltmeter and also provides very basic timekeeping. The Microcontroller code is written in Picbasic Pro 3.Accurate time is maintained by synchronising the clock to my Master Clock that is synchronised to a radio "atomic" clock.The clock is based on an instructable "Multimeter Clock" by abbtech see pic 2. The instructable can be found here and website here alan-parekh.com .I purchased a kit of parts from Alan's site and decided to change the design quite a bit and give the clock a retro industrial look.I had a different version of Picbasic to the original code so first of all I had to convert it to run on PICBasic Pro version 3. I added the following.Switched display On and Off (keeping battery backup ...

A trans man took a selfie each day for 3 years to show how he's changed

Jamie Raine took a selfie every day for three years to capture the physical changes that occurred over his transition.

Doorknob key rack

If you're like me, you've got a small pile of everyday carry items somewhere near your door. To help keep this ever growing pile of extra keys and knick-knacks in check I made a key holder from door knobs which is mounted on the wall, perfect for working double duty as a coat rack or hat holder.The best thing about these types of door knob locks is that they have a very standard profile that fits most types of house keys, so any guests that come over can find an empty knob and usually find a key that works!Your keys will be organized, hats and coats will have a home, and everyone will love the stylish look of operable door knobs that hold their keys. Ready to get organized? Let's make!

Hillary Clinton 'loved' the idea of playing the bartender on 'SNL'

'SNL' writers open up about writing a sketch for the possible future president.

aquaponic BALCONY GARDEN

aquaponic BALCONY GARDENIoT (Internet of Things) Capable if you are interested in this aspect of aquaponics.DIY PROJECT -- purchase materials locally and build -- by rik kretzingerWith all the interest around the world in aquaponics there are a number of creative units being developed for small spaces. Many if not most of these solution do not address a number of issues that cause these units to end up on Craig's List or in the trash at the end of the day. None of these solutions address the automation aspect of aquaponics to take the stress out of operating a small unit effectively at an affordable price point and can be assembled safely by anyone interested in aquaponics.AUTOMATION ELEMENTS found with in the garden:1 - DHT-22 - Humidity and Temperature 2 - DS18B20 - 1 wire Temperature probes (grow-bed and fish tank) 1 - Ultrasonic Module HC-SR04 Distance Sensor for Arduino ...

[View All Videos]

Top News
1
Verizon to raise price of grandfathered unlimited data plans by $20

To be clear, $49.99 is the cost of unlimited data alone and is added on top of your monthly voice and text plan. I've got the Nationwide Talk & Text 450 plan ($59.99), so this change would raise my monthly payment to $109.98, and that's before Verizon's extra fees and charges. If you've got more or unlimited voice minutes, you'll pay more each month. For customers determined to remain on the unlimited plan, Verizon will now let them purchase new smartphones through its monthly device payment plan; previously, you could only buy phones outright at their full retail cost. That's one upside in this news.

2
From Seizing Inspiration To Interview Red Flags: This Week's Top Leadership Stories

This week's top leadership stories may help you test suspicions about job candidates, have more great ideas, and hang onto them when you do.

3
Surface Pro 4 Hands-on: It fixes almost all of the Pro 3's flaws

Despite making the keyboard larger, Microsoft also managed to improve the trackpad, which now covers a 40 percent larger area using a glass surface. It’s not quite as nice as the Force Touch trackpad on the 2015 MacBook (you can’t click on the top of the trackpad), but it was one of the most responsive trackpads I’ve used on a Windows devices, and right up there with what you’d expect from Apple’s best until this year.

4
Elon Musk clarifies he does not hate Apple

In an interview with German newspaper   Handelsblatt  yesterday, Elon Musk, CEO and CTO of Space X and lead product architect at Tesla, said that Apple is jokingly referred to as the ‘Tesla Graveyard’ because the company usually hires people that have been fired from Tesla. He also made fun of the Apple Watch in the interview.

5
In a first, Chinese hackers are arrested at the behest of the U.S. government

It is not clear if the hackers arrested were with the Chinese military, but they were accused of carrying out state-sponsored economic espionage, individuals familiar with the matter said. Commercial espionage is defined as hacking systems to steal intellectual property for the benefit of a country’s own industries. The hacks of U.S. government personnel information, which officials say were carried out by Chinese individuals, fall in a separate category since they do not deal with companies or industry.

6
Internet.org by Facebook

7
Amazon Prime competitor Jet.com is dropping its $49 membership fee

Jet.com is similar to Amazon in that it offers everyday items – from cleaning products and appliances to toys and sporting goods – for a low price with free shipping on orders over $35. Its ‘Smart Cart’ system lets customers save around 5 percent when ordering the items in bulk. Jet.com works with third party retailers to fulfill orders, and offers free returns on all items.

8
Why Japanese Kids Can Walk to School Alone

The original dream has three strands. The first is about prosperity: the classic saga of penniless strivers working hard to lift their families into the middle class. An integral part of this saga is continuity between generations—with parents sacrificing so their children can succeed, and successful children never forgetting “where they came from.” Needless to say, this dream of hard work and intergenerational mobility is shared by the 95 percent of humanity who are not American. But it is called the American dream because the United States was the first nation in history where it actually came true for large numbers of people.

9
Why I believe the mistreatment of women is the number one human rights abuse

With his signature resolve, former US President Jimmy Carter dives into three unexpected reasons why the mistreatment of women and girls continues in so many manifestations in so many parts of the world, both developed and developing. The final reason he gives? “In general, men don’t give a damn.”

10
Build software better, together

Our new office in SOMA is designed for everyone to work better and happier, and includes unique spaces like a DJ booth and coder caves to cater to any work style. Some of our local GitHub staples include karaoke nights, our Giants stadium box, an annual charitable dodgeball tournament, and various athletic groups.

11
Physical therapy is boring -- play a game instead

You’ve just been injured, and you’re on the way home from an hour of physical therapy. The last thing you want to do on your own is confusing exercises that take too long to show results. TED Fellow Cosmin Mihaiu demos a fun, cheap solution that turns boring physical therapy exercises into a video game with crystal-clear instructions.

12
Etsy - Your place to buy and sell all things handmade, vintage, and supplies

I want to receive Etsy Finds, an email newsletter of fresh trends and editors' picks.

13
IGN's Top 25 PlayStation 4 Games - IGN

Far Cry 4’s open world isn’t just for show, though if it was, it still would have been worth exploring: the Shangri-La sections in particular were like taking a safari through an absurdist fever-dream we didn’t want to wake up from. Even if it weren’t so gorgeous, the smart in-game economy, flexible combat, and well-designed sidequests made it tough to stay on the beaten path. One doesn’t usually play Far Cry for the multiplayer, but Far Cry 4’s asymmetrical 5v5 competitive mode does a surprisingly good job of capturing the sense of scale and freedom of the single player, giving it legs well after you’re done seeing the sights of Kyrat.

14
A warrior’s cry against child marriage

Memory Banda’s life took a divergent path from her sister’s. When her sister reached puberty, she was sent to a traditional “initiation camp” that teaches girls “how to sexually please a man.” She got pregnant there — at age 11. Banda, however, refused to go. Instead, she organized others and asked her community’s leader to issue a bylaw that no girl should be forced to marry before turning 18. She pushed on to the national level … with incredible results for girls across Malawi.

15
Yup, I built a nuclear fusion reactor

Taylor Wilson believes nuclear fusion is a solution to our future energy needs, and that kids can change the world. And he knows something about both of those: When he was 14, he built a working fusion reactor in his parents' garage. Now 17, he takes the TED stage at short notice to tell (the short version of) his story.

16
A man in Ireland rode a horse into Tesco because nothing makes sense anymore

A man in Ireland rode a horse into Tesco because nothing makes sense anymore

17
This app knows how you feel -- from the look on your face

Our emotions influence every aspect of our lives — how we learn, how we communicate, how we make decisions. Yet they’re absent from our digital lives; the devices and apps we interact with have no way of knowing how we feel. Scientist Rana el Kaliouby aims to change that. She demos a powerful new technology that reads your facial expressions and matches them to corresponding emotions. This “emotion engine” has big implications, she says, and could change not just how we interact with machines — but with each other.

18
Math Mystery: Shinichi Mochizuki and the Impenetrable Proof

Adding to the enigma is Mochizuki himself. He has so far lectured about his work only in Japan, in Japanese, and despite being fluent in English, he has declined invitations to talk about it elsewhere. He does not speak to journalists; several requests for an interview for this story went unanswered. Mochizuki has replied to e-mails from other mathematicians and been forthcoming to colleagues who have visited him, but his only public input has been sporadic posts on his website. In December 2014, he wrote that to understand his work, there was a “need for researchers to deactivate the thought patterns that they have installed in their brains and taken for granted for so many years”. To mathematician Lieven Le Bruyn of the University of Antwerp in Belgium, Mochizuki's attitude sounds defiant. “Is it just me,” he wrote on his blog earlier this year, “or is Mochizuki really sticking up his middle finger to the mathematical community”.

19
Paper beats plastic? How to rethink environmental folklore

Most of us want to do the right thing when it comes to the environment. But things aren’t as simple as opting for the paper bag, says sustainability strategist Leyla Acaroglu. A bold call for us to let go of tightly-held green myths and think bigger in order to create systems and products that ease strain on the planet.

20
The Exemplary Narcissism of Snoopy

But by the late 1960s, Snoopy had begun to change. For example, in a strip dated May 1, 1969, he’s dancing by himself: “This is my ‘First Day of May’ dance. It differs only slightly from my ‘First Day of Fall’ dance, which differs also only slightly from my ‘First Day of Spring’ dance.” Snoopy continues dancing and ends with: “Actually, even I have a hard time telling them apart.” Snoopy was still hilarious, but something fundamental had shifted. He didn’t need any of the other characters in order to be what he was. He needed only his imagination. More and more often he appeared alone on his doghouse, sleeping or typing a novel or a love letter. Indeed, his doghouse—which was hardly taller than a beagle yet big enough inside to hold an Andrew Wyeth painting as well as a pool table—came to be the objective correlative of Snoopy’s rich inner life, a place that no human ever got to see.

21
Victoria's Secret gets hammered for jarring Photoshop mistake

The image has steadily gained traction as some commenters shared concerns regarding the botched editing job, while others called into question the company's need to edit model photos at all.

22
Deep sea diving ... in a wheelchair

When Sue Austin got a power chair 16 years ago, she felt a tremendous sense of freedom — yet others looked at her as though she had lost something. In her art, she aims to convey the spirit of wonder she feels wheeling through the world. Includes thrilling footage of an underwater wheelchair that lets her explore ocean beds, drifting through schools of fish, floating free in 360 degrees. (Filmed at TEDxWomen.)

23
Confessions of a bad feminist

When writer Roxane Gay dubbed herself a "bad feminist," she was making a joke, acknowledging that she couldn't possibly live up to the demands for perfection of the feminist movement. But she's realized that the joke rang hollow. In a thoughtful and provocative talk, she asks us to embrace all flavors of feminism — and make the small choices that, en masse, might lead to actual change.

24
Computer science is now the top major for women at Stanford University

(By Sarah McBride, Reuters) – Computer science has for the first time become the most popular major for female students at Stanford University, a hopeful sign for those trying to build up the thin ranks of women in the technology field.

25
Someone published thousands of photos of historic US space missions — here are some amazing ones

The project's lead, Kipp Teague, told The Planetary Society  that the collection includes every single photo taken on the moon's surface, along with those from the voyage there and back. His Apollo Archives project uploaded the unprocessed versions of the original NASA scans into Flickr albums organized by mission.

26
The surprising way groups like ISIS stay in power

ISIS, Hezbollah, Hamas. These three very different groups are known for violence — but that’s only a portion of what they do, says policy analyst Benedetta Berti. They also attempt to win over populations with social work: setting up schools and hospitals, offering safety and security, and filling the gaps left by weak governments. Understanding the broader work of these groups suggests new strategies for ending the violence.

27 Leader of Christian group adjusts incorrect doomsday prediction: 'Soon'

Chris McCann of the eBible fellowship admits it was ‘surprising’ the world did not end on 7 October but says they will ‘keep studying the Bible’ for clues

28
'Great Pause' Among Prosecutors As DNA Proves Fallible

Inman has worked with DNA evidence since the 1980s. He says forensic DNA-matching is based on sound science, but sometimes labs can get ahead of themselves. What happened in Texas, he says, is that labs have been using cutting-edge "testing kits" that can extract tiny traces of DNA from crime scenes, but those samples were then analyzed with math that's not suited to "weak" samples that combine DNA from many people.

29
9 TED Talks to help you understand racism in America

Our biases can be dangerous, even deadly — as we've seen in the cases of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and Eric Garner, in Staten Island, New York. Diversity advocate Vernā Myers looks closely at some of the subconscious attitudes we hold toward out-groups. She makes a plea to all people: Acknowledge your biases. Then move toward, not away from, the groups that make you uncomfortable. In a funny, impassioned, important talk, she shows us how.

30
The HP Spectre x2 is like the Surface Pro, but cheaper and lower-specced

Again, what's nice is that the x2 starts at $800 with the keyboard included in the box, as opposed to being sold as a separate $130 accessory -- something Microsoft's gotten away with for years. Meanwhile, the Surface Pro 4 not only comes without the keyboard, but also starts at $899 with the same RAM and storage, nearly a hundred bucks more. All told, then, it has the potential to be a good deal, but that lower total price comes somewhat at the expense of specs. In particular, the display tops out at 1,920 x 1,280 resolution; though that's probably fine for most users, it's still lower than the 2,763 x 1,824 offered on the SP4. On the inside too, the x2 makes do not with new sixth-gen Core i5/i7 processors , but sixth-gen Core M chips instead. (Although it's worth noting the base SP4 also comes with a Core M chip.) As we've found in our own reviews , Core M is lower-powered than more robust Core-series CPUs, but doesn't actually offer a big advantage in battery life. Speaking of the sort, HP is promising 10 hours of runtime.

31
Inside the creation of the Microsoft Surface Book

“The idea is, we’re here to reinvent and inspire the category, we’re here to make a business,” said Panay, adding, “One of our missions and goals is, we’re lighting up Windows 10. And if it inspires others to do very similar products, we will gladly…” Panay stopped and caught himself. The Surface Book is his baby, he’s clearly proud of it, maybe he even loves it (the way you love a product). After stumbling a bit more on the word “gladly,” Panay continued. “I don’t know if I’d say ‘gladly’. It’s hard from a product-making perspective, to be fair. But I will say, we expect it. I don’t want to say ‘gladly,’ I can’t. I think others would, but I think we expect it.”

32
Vizio: We've made the best TV in the world. And it's $130,000.

Speaking of SUHD, the Samsung JS9500 , another HDR-capable TV, is said to hit 1,000 nits peak brightness. It has an undisclosed number of full-array local dimming zones and delivers 93 to 95 percent of the P3 color gamut. It's a curved TV (the R series is flat) and at a current price of $3,500 costs a lot less than the Vizio for the 65-inch size.

33
Art in exile

Iranian-born artist Shirin Neshat explores the paradox of being an artist in exile: a voice for her people, but unable to go home. In her work, she explores Iran pre- and post-Islamic Revolution, tracing political and societal change through powerful images of women.

34
Pompeiians healthy before volcanic death, CT scans reveal - CNET

The scans also found fractured bones, revealing that at least some of the deaths were caused by falling roofs instead of suffocation. A cast of a body thought to have been that of a pregnant woman because of a rounded stomach showed no sign of foetal bones or adult bones; likewise the famous cast of a dog was found to contain no bones. It's possible these bones were removed from the cavity prior to the Fiorelli process.

35
1968: Elton John's first photo shoot

In 1968, he posed for one of his first publicity photo shoots, debuting the flashy presence that would soon make him one of the biggest music stars in the world.

36
LinkedIn May Owe You $1,500

LinkedIn says it has revised its disclosures to clarify that two reminder emails will be sent as part of its "Add Connections" feature. The company says it will, by year's end, also offer an option to users to cancel a connection invitation, thereby halting any additional reminder emails from being sent out.

37
Action video games improve brain function more than so-called 'brain games'

From “brain games” designed to enhance mental fitness, to games used to improve real-world problems, to games created purely to entertain, today’s video games can have a variety of potential impacts on the brain. A new article argues that it is the specific content, dynamics, and mechanics of individual games that determine their effects on the brain and that action video games might have particularly positive benefits.

38
Using our practical wisdom

In an intimate talk, Barry Schwartz dives into the question "How do we do the right thing?" With help from collaborator Kenneth Sharpe, he shares stories that illustrate the difference between following the rules and truly choosing wisely.

39
Scientists hope to attract millions to 'DNA.LAND'

For instance, to stitch together a coherent data set from genomes that have been analysed by multiple companies and which each test for different genetic markers, DNA.LAND will use a method called imputation. This allows the project to infer the identities of gene variants that were not originally tested, filling in gaps on the basis of knowledge about specific markers that are often inherited together. Participants will be told about newly identified genetic variants uncovered by imputation. The researchers also have promised to tell participants if the work uncovers that they have relatives in the project database.

40
Facebook, what's up with that weird graphic that shows up after you log off?

We’ve all seen that status update – you know, the one that’s clearly your friend trolling you for forgetting to log off Facebook on their computer.

41
7 Habits of Highly Respected Leaders

Leaders should not ask others to do something that they have not done in the past nor would they be willing to do now. They lead by example and their efforts will set a standard for the rest of the organization. If they are unwilling to put in the extra time and effort into a project they expect of their staff, they will be seen as hypocrites and lose the respect of those under them. Leaders who are highly respected will put in at least as much time and effort as those they serve. Often they will lead by being the hardest working person on their team.

42
Light's bizarre -- and a little bit brilliant -- take on camera tech - CNET

They're asking people to take a lot on faith for the preorders, of which they'll require a $200 (£130, AU$280 converted) deposit. And the prices seem awfully high to me. At that price, the appeal is for professionals who can spend some money on another camera to play with, but I'm not sure consumers will be willing to fork over that much money unless it really gets raves. And even then, I think it's more likely to eat sales away from cameras like the Sony Cyber-shot RX10 II.

43
Psychedelics Could Be The Next Big Thing In Mental Health Care

Things do happen, but they're relatively rare. We're very mindful, and as a field, we've been very responsible with monitoring and safeguarding these sessions. About a third of participants taking a high dose of psilocybin will at some point in time during the session have what you might call a bad trip. It's going to be aversive -- the person may be very frightened -- but in the context of this type of trial, when they're on the couch and being monitored, the person can't do something stupid. We don't see any evidence of prolonged psychiatric reactions or harm, or of the person "not coming back." 

44
Stephen Hawking fears competent machines, not malicious ones

Like any good scientist, Stephen Hawking has taken his time. A Reddit AMA (Ask Me Anything) that  collected questions from the site's users back in July is today being answered comprehensively by the world's most famous living physicist. Unsurprisingly, given his high profile and the extended period allowed for questions, this is already the third-largest AMA that Reddit has hosted, with over 9,000 comments submitted.

45
Google Balloon and Facebook Drone Teams Collaborate to Bring Internet Access to Billions | MIT Technology Review

In a session dedicated to the question of how to give everyone on earth access to the Internet, the companies were asked why they didn’t collaborate instead of running parallel efforts to achieve the same thing. “You shouldn’t presume that we’re not already working together,” said Yael Maguire, who leads Facebook’s Connectivity Lab working on Internet access. Rich DeVaul, who was leader of Google’s balloon project when it first began in 2011, confirmed that the leaders of the two projects are talking. “I’m looking forward to collaborative possibilities as well as some friendly competition,” he said.

46
This is how Surface Book's crazy hinge works

The display and tablet portion of the Surface Book locks into the dock through a series of clips on its base. Pressing a button on the dock will release it from what Microsoft calls "muscle wire locks." It's a neat mechanism: rather than pulling down a lever that unlocks the display, the keyboard sends a signal to start the unlocking process. The Surface Book uses a GPU built into the keyboard when it's docked, so the tablet won't become detachable until Windows finishes up whatever it's working on and switches over to the tablet's dedicated GPU.

47
Zuckerberg Confirms Facebook Is Working On Augmented Reality

“Yeah!” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said excitedly in response to a big question for his company: is Facebook working on augmented reality? “It’s a bit further out,” he followed up during a talk about virtual reality at the Vanity Fair New Establishment Summit in San Francisco.

48
5 Strategies For A More Productive Workday

Making the most of each workday takes a conscious effort starting the moment you wake up. But working more purposefully is about sticking to the agenda that you set for yourself, taking useful notes, and tackling your goals head on. See each task to completion, and make sure it's the best investment of your time. It takes practice and fine-tuning, but keep with it and before long you’ll find yourself getting more done in less time.

49
The 10 most important things from Microsoft's Lumia event

Microsoft is still relatively fresh off the launch of Windows 10, which — as presenter and Windows team head Terry Myerson pointed out — happened less than three months ago. Now, the company is getting ready to release its smartphone variant, Windows 10 Mobile. And while the operating system isn’t out yet, we just got our first look at the phones that will run it: Microsoft’s two flagship Lumias, along with one budget option.

50
How The Wrong People Get Promoted And How To Change It

Greedy companies breed bad bosses. It used to be work hard and be rewarded, now it's more like work hard and the company will chew you up and spit you out for a younger, less expensive worker, or you will be downsized or out sourced to another country for a fraction of your salary. Then your resume, no matter how impressive it is, will if you are very lucky and extremely diligent, get you another job for which you are far too qualified for and you will take a huge pay cut. This process will continue over and over. Then you will find yourself over 45 and waiting tables or working in a Walmart until you are old enough to retire on a pittance from Social Security. To top it off, during all that, your house was foreclosed , your credit ruined and any retirement or investments you had were cashed in long ago. Meanwhile the CEO who chewed you up is now an ex pat who retired at 40 and is living in a million dollar home on a tropical island with his trophy wife.

51 Inside an FBI hostage crisis: a stolen boy, an angry loner, an underground bunker
52 How personal experiences can affect who you're attracted to
53 Crop insurance, an idea worth seeding
54 14 Comic Con cosplayers who would even impress The Doctor
55 Teen falls to his death while taking an extreme selfie, report says - CNET
56 Get an iPhone 6s with Putin's head on it because reasons
57 No PC maker could escape the lull ahead of Windows 10 and Skylake
58 Apple News app disabled in mainland China, works fine in Hong Kong
59 Twitter's Moment - Stratechery by Ben Thompson
60 Is Web design becoming irrelevant?
61 11 very strange 'Harry Potter' reveals made by J.K. Rowling
62 PlayStation Plus vs. Games with Gold Comparison - Xbox One Wiki Guide - IGN
63 Reg Saddler on Twitter
64 Amazon Prime is wreaking havoc on college mailrooms
65 Microsoft's upgraded Band is a little sleeker, and smarter too
66 How video games improve your interaction design
67 Danish zoo says lion dissection will be educational for children
68 Chromecast Audio review: Give your old speakers a new brain
69 How to understand the periodic table
70 Chromecast Audio review: Easily link your phone to your audio system for less
71 5 major cyber hacks and the tools that might stop them next time
72 The best airlines for long trips in economy class
73 The Incredibles 2 is coming in 2019, and Toy Story 4 will be late
74 13 bloody amazing 'Game of Thrones' cosplayers
75 More than half of Google searches now happen on mobile devices
76 Get the inside story on 'Man In the High Castle' at live screening event
77 Airpaper Will Cancel Your Comcast Service For You
78 Histography - Timeline of History
79 Photo of baby with IVF syringes shows the full story of mom's love
80 Parents resign from parenting on son's 20th birthday
81 The new Roku does 4K and finds the remote for you
82 Never Buy a Teacup Pig - Modern Farmer
83 7 intelligent social analytics tools for the new age
84 Why Isolation Is A More Serious Problem For Freelancers Than You Think
85 The Flash: A Guide to DC's Speedsters - IGN
86 A guy wrote an honest letter to all the women in his engineering class
87 5 Ways To Prepare Your Home For A Netflix Binge
88 There's a new 'Game of Thrones' book out, but it isn't 'The Winds of Winter' - CNET
89 Why Having Friends At Work Is So Important
90 The next food revolution
91 Brick-and-mortar retailers are betting on these 5 in-store technologies to win back shoppers