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First look at the new Guardians of the Galaxy animated TV series

This is great news, just announced this Friday at New York Comic Con: Marvel is releasing a Guardians of the Galaxy animated TV series coming in 2015 on Disney XD! Check out the first sequences of how it is going to look here (I like that colorful 80s look!)

Edward Snowden's Life in Moscow Isn't as Bad as You Think

'Citizenfour' provides never-before-seen footage of Snowden's life on the run after lifting a treasure trove of information from the NSA last year.

An Astronaut's Fisheye View of Earth Spinning Day Into Night

If you've forgotten just how fragile and beautiful planet Earth is, this time-lapse video from the International Space Station should jog your memory.

Deadpool Dance Party Takes Over New York Comic Con

Birds of a Deadpool flock together.

Blast zombies with lasers aboard this California train - CNET

This "off the rails" train ride is the perfect way to spend a night zapping the undead for some pre-Halloween fun.

11-Year-Old's 'All About That Bass' Dance Puts Us All to Shame

Taylor Hatala, the 11-year-old dance prodigy, just served up an impressive routine to "All About That Bass."

Citizenfour review – Poitras' victorious film shows Snowden vindicated

Laura Poitras’ documentary disentangles NSA surveillance and plots the story of Edward Snowden in Hong Kong and Moscow

'Idiot' US Airways Passenger Makes Ebola Joke, Hazmat Team Shows Up

A four-person crew in hazmat suits rushed onto a US Airways flight when landed in the Dominican Republic on Wednesday after a passenger made an Ebola joke.

Horse Casually Strolls Into Police Department Like It’s Not a Big Deal

An English police department was visited by either the bravest or drunkest tiny horse in all of the UK on Monday.

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Top News
1
Edward Norton Really Compared His New 'Birdman' Film to 'Gravity'

NEW YORK — The Hulk and Batman walked onto a stage to small talk about another superhero. No joke. Edward Norton and Michael Keaton totally teamed up Friday night at New York Comic Con to discuss their Birdman film, with Norton going so far as to compare the upcoming dark comedy to the Oscar-winning space epic Gravity .

2
Walgreens Planning for October 18 Apple Pay Launch

An internal memo addressed to Walgreens employees designed to prepare them for the upcoming launch of Apple Pay suggests that Apple's new payments service might be going live on Saturday, October 18. A Saturday launch is unusual, but it could make sense as Apple Pay is designed for in-store shopping and a weekend debut would give customers time to try the service. It is, however, also possible that Apple Pay will go live shortly before the October 18 date, following the company's Thursday, October 16 iPad event, with support coming to Walgreens a day or two later. At its October 16 event, Apple is expected to debut a new iPad Air, Retina iMacs, and possibly a new Retina iPad mini. The event, which will also likely see Apple previewing OS X Yosemite one last time before its public debut, would also be an opportune time to divulge more information about Apple Pay and possibly even launch the payments service. As announced on September 9, popular drug store Walgreens is one of Apple's major launch partners, along with other companies like McDonalds, Macy's, Staples, and more.

3
http://manyland.com/

Manyland is a 2d sandbox browser MMO. In an open world, you can chat with people, build, draw, play multiplayer platformers, RPGs and adventures others made, join friendly PvP, and create worlds and games yourself!

4
As Snapchat "hack" highlights, promises of privacy and security can be very dangerous

That’s not to say we should all give up: It’s better to try use the security and privacy mechanisms that are most likely to work, rather than to use none at all. Use a password manager and two-factor authentication! Encrypt what you can! But it does make the recommendations business a hair-raising one for someone — like myself — who wants the recommendations to be suitable for as wide an audience as possible, including non-technical types.

5
The NSA Won’t Disclose What It Leaked To The Public | TechCrunch

There have been numerous authorized leaks over the years, including the controversial White House leaks about the killing of Osama bin Laden . There have been even more unauthorized leaks, however—by government officials and workers. It makes sense for Congress to want to know when classified information has been leaked or declassified in order to distinguish official leaks from unauthorized ones. Lawmakers on the intelligence committees look silly when they tell reporters they can’t talk about something, while government officials are freely yapping about the same topic behind their backs. They also look silly when they publicly call for a criminal investigation into a leak that turns out to have been authorized. And, of course, members of both parties in Congress want to know when the party in power in the White House might be authorizing leaks for political gain.

6
This Is Not A Startup Story

In 2011, I started a book business with my best friend called Emily Books . We were qualified to start a business in some ways, not so much in others. We had some expertise in our field: We’d both worked at the intersection of publishing and tech for years, and we wanted to start an online bookstore that sold a small collection of books and allowed readers to subscribe and receive a carefully chosen book per month automatically. Our idea was that this would provide an online version of what we loved about shopping at independent bookstores: the great taste and careful curation of expert booksellers, which no algorithm can replicate. We had no management experience, though, and had never created a PowerPoint presentation or written a business plan. We also, probably more importantly, had no ambition to found the kind of startup that barrels toward acquisition or IPO. We wanted to test waters, grow organically, and pivot on a dime in response to customers’ needs like a startup, but we also wanted to stay independent, avoid gimmicks, and build a sustainable business that would stay true to its core values.

7
NYCC 2014: The First Agent Carter Footage Reveal Features Howard Stark! - IGN

The Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D panel at today's New York Comic Con featured very little in the way of questions and answers, but what it lacked in dialogue it more than made up for in footage. The episode set to air this coming Tuesday was screened after a brief introduction from Marvel's Jeph Loeb and Director Coulson himself, Clark Gregg. When that was complete, there was one additional surprise - the first footage from the upcoming Agent Carter series!

8
CRM and Cloud Computing To Grow Your Business - Salesforce.com

Customer relationship management (CRM) is all about managing the relationships you have with your customers. CRM combines business processes, people, and technology to achieve this single goal: getting and keeping customers. It's an overall strategy to help you learn more about their behavior so you can develop stronger, lasting relationships that will benefit both of you. It’s very hard to run a successful business without a strong focus on CRM, as well as adding elements of social media and making the transition to a social enterprise to connect with customers in new ways.

9
How playing an instrument benefits your brain - Anita Collins

When you listen to music, multiple areas of your brain become engaged and active. But when you actually play an instrument, that activity becomes more like a full-body brain workout. What’s going on? Anita Collins explains the fireworks that go off in musicians’ brains when they play, and examines some of the long-term positive effects of this mental workout.

10
Remains of Alexander the Great's Father Confirmed Found : DNews

A team of Greek researchers has confirmed that bones found in a two-chambered royal tomb at Vergina, a town some 100 miles away from Amphipolis's mysterious burial mound, indeed belong to the Macedonian King Philip II, Alexander the Great's father.

11
Riding shotgun in Tesla's fastest car ever

On our short test drive in the new P85D (sadly, we weren't allowed to take the steering wheel ourselves), we came away impressed. In the first part of the demo, the driver slammed her foot on the pedal, exploding the car onto the runway through a rainbow tunnel that had us feeling like we were on an amusement park ride. That dual motor brought us from 0 to 60 in just 3.2 seconds, just like Tesla promised. Then, she enabled autopilot mode, and the car knew to stay in lane simply by detecting the white lines on either side of the road. It also knew to stay within the speed limit by recognizing the posted 25 MPH sign. To change lanes, she simply flicked the turn signal on, and it gently moved to the left. Finally, it knew to slow down and stop because the car detected a stopped car in front of it. All this was done without her having to touch the steering wheel or have her feet on the pedals.

12
The cookie is dead. Here's how Facebook, Google, and Apple are tracking you now

You will be if any savvi computer company/hacker "proves" you either broke the law or are a danger to society by saying or showing your movements where you were at a certain time or place. It's technology, people can hack! They can make out that you were in a friends house when you were actually lying in bed asleep! It's already happening. My god..people really think that because they have nothing to hide that it's ok to be tracked! EVERYONE has a right to privacy. Why do you think snowden is on the run!? From a government that is hiding too much. I'm tellin ya tho..Minority Report is gona happen!! Sorry for the big rant..

13
Co.Design | business + design

Thanks for stopping by Fast Company’s Co.Design. Our focus is on highlighting the world’s best examples of design and innovation, working in concert. We started this site with a few simple premises in mind. First, design is a window onto the world at large, and the culture we live in. Designers create objects that meet some unrecognized need. All businesses strive to do the same thing.

14
Multitasking Damages Your Brain And Career, New Studies Suggest

Let me guess: The study used male test subjects! Ask ANY mother of more than one child, -multi-tasking is crucial for continuity of workflow. Raising next-generation humans is the toughest job there is, because it never stops. And Daddies are horrible at multi-tasking, at least at first, -until they learn how. (-which is why I expect their subjects were predominantly male) I am not biting. While the test results are a big boon to the male species and a gift to women in the workplace, I doubt their accuracy or applicability. (application?) WHY? Ask any Floor RN in any hospital. We keep people alive by multi-tasking, and its incredibly efficient. OF COURSE it would be more ‘fun’ to not have to multi-task, and it DOES exhaust the worker to multi-task, but the study is not really applicable in the real world, so why even bother to run it? A bit like investigating why poop stinks. SO? Will it change ANYTHING? Silliness.

15
Do Cats Control My Mind?

New neuroscience research says that Toxo —the cysts in our brains from cats—can improve our self-control. For the 30 percent of people who have this infection, it's about more than promiscuity, schizophrenia, and car crashes.

16
Hacked Screenshots Show Friend-To-Friend Payments Feature Hidden In Facebook Messenger | TechCrunch

In the version Aude investigated, Messenger payments only worked with debit cards, not credit cards or bank accounts. That’s likely because money transfers are cheaper to process when they come from debit cards and don’t require approvals or numbers some people don’t know off-hand like connecting a bank account. Aude speculates that “based on my understanding of the debit interchange rates, each transaction will cost Facebook roughly $0.40 to $0.50 (Durbin swipe fee + ACH fee). The app didn’t mention a fee to send, so it’s probably free, at least initially. Over time they might add a $1 fee.” This can’t be confirmed, though.

17
The Unsafety Net: How Social Media Turned Against Women

For some, the costs are higher. In 2010, 12-year-old Amanda Todd bared her chest while chatting online with a person who’d assured her that he was a boy, but was in fact a grown man with a history of pedophilia. For the next two years, Amanda and her mother, Carol Todd, were unable to stop anonymous users from posting that image on sexually explicit pages. A Facebook page, labeled “Controversial Humor,” used Amanda’s name and image—and the names and images of other girls—without consent. In October 2012, Amanda committed suicide, posting a YouTube video that explained her harassment and her decision. In April 2014, Dutch officials announced that they had arrested a 35-year-old man suspected to have used the Internet to extort dozens of girls, including Amanda, in Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The suspect now faces charges of child pornography, extortion, criminal harassment, and Internet luring.

18
Hawk takes out quadcopter drone, reclaims the sky

Of course, this isn’t the first time that birds have taken out a drone that was invading nearby airspace. During December 2013, YouTube user Buddhanz1 filmed a similar scenario where an entire flock of birds started dive bombing his DJI phantom drone. Also filmed with a GoPro Hero 3+ Black, repeated attacks from the birds ripped the battery connector and control of the drone was slowly lost as it plummeted to the ground below. The crash landing in that video seemed much more devastating to the drone hardware.

19
Ideo Helps Develop New Designed-Minded Journalism Degree

At a two-day workshop over the summer at Ideo’s New York office, Ideo Location Director Ashlea Powell and fellow designer Alex Gallafent helped brainstorm the program’s curriculum by teaching the New School’s journalism professors about design thinking and Ideo’s own process. “People have a wide ranging understanding of what the word design means. Initially, for this small set of professors, design meant something really superficial--whereas design thinking is really an approach to problem solving,” Powell explains.

20
'Twin Peaks' returns in 2016 after 25-year hiatus

Ready for a slice of pie and a cup of damn fine coffee? Twin Peaks creators David Lynch and Mark Frost sure are, as they're reviving the show for a third season that's due to air on Showtime in 2016. The duo announced as much via Twitter with a characteristically-vague trailer (see it below). In it, Laura Palmer stands in the red room, stares into the camera, and snaps her fingers. Sure! At least someone isn't speaking backwards, right?

21
There’s Something Going On In L.A. | TechCrunch

It’s the new refrain I hear from investors and even entrepreneurs these days. I hear it right after people decide to come by for a few days to “check out what all the fuss is about.” I hear it when I visit LPs all across the country: “Yeah, I haven’t been out there for a few years but I keep hearing that something is going on there.”

22
Hawk Attacks A Quadcopter Drone, Wins In Terrifying Fashion

A great-tailed grackle stands gape-mouthed in the shade in 120-degree heat near Furnace Creek Ranch on the eve of the AdventurCORPS Badwater 135 ultra-marathon race on July 14, 2013 in Death Valley National Park, California. Billed as the toughest footrace in the world, the 36th annual Badwater 135 starts at Badwater Basin in Death Valley, 280 feet below sea level, where athletes begin a 135-mile non-stop run over three mountain ranges in extreme mid-summer desert heat to finish at 8,350-foot near Mount Whitney for a total cumulative vertical ascent of 13,000 feet. July 10 marked the 100-year anniversary of the all-time hottest world record temperature of 134 degrees, set in Death Valley where the average high in July is 116. A total of 96 competitors from 22 nations are attempting the run which equals about five back-to-back marathons. Previous winners have completed all 135 miles in slightly less than 24 hours. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

23
Apple's next big event is on October 16th, new iPad and Macs likely

It's only been a month since the world's press descended on the Flint Center for the Performing Arts to see Tim Cook reveal a pair of new iPhones, and Apple's already calling everyone back again. Invites to an October 16th event at the company's Cupertino headquarters have just started making the rounds -- if rumor mill's ceaseless whispers hold true, we'll be getting a eyeful of a new iPad Air and some new Mac computers, along with a few software notes to round out the package.

24
Watch a hawk defend its turf against a quadcopter in the only way it knows

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25
Edward Snowden’s Privacy Tips: “Get Rid Of Dropbox,” Avoid Facebook And Google | TechCrunch

[And here's a more complete Snowden quote, from around 1:04:55 in the video: "We're talking about encryption. We're talking about dropping programs that are hostile to privacy. For example, Dropbox? Get rid of Dropbox, it doesn't support encryption, it doesn't protect your private files. And use competitors like SpiderOak, that do the same exact service but they protect the content of what you're sharing."]

26 William Mortensen: photographic master at the monster’s ball

Ansel Adams called him ‘the antichrist’ and wanted him written out of history. But William Mortensen’s grotesque photographs of death, nudity and torture and are now having their day. Chris Campion pays tribute to a master of the macabre

27
This Video Of A White Lawyer Confronting Police For Detaining A Black Man Is Shocking (VIDEO)

Police respond to a burglary in an upscale neighborhood. Police spot black man walking down the street carrying bags. Police detain said black man with bags because…suspicious. And sadly, said black man was never involved in a burglary .

28
Forget Apple. Make your own smartwatch with TinyScreen - CNET

Moving up to the smartwatch kit costs an $85 (about £53, AU$97) pledge and includes a Bluetooth module. More advanced tinkerers may want to look into the $200 sensor kit, which includes everything from the smartwatch kit, but adds an accelerometer, ambient light sensor, compass and Wi-Fi. This gives you a lot of room to customize your own gear. Tiny Circuits shows off a version of a homemade smartwatch that takes the TinyScreen kit and incorporates it into a 3D-printed case and band.

29
Apple’s Jony Ive Is Not Flattered By Xiaomi | TechCrunch

At the Vanity Fair Summit, Jony Ive just gave his much-anticipated panel, “Genius by Design.” Ive spent a significant chunk of his time on stage talking about Apple’s design process in broad strokes, touching upon the evolution of ideas and the process by which the team makes decisions on when to make changes to their designs.

30
Google's Eric Schmidt explains the #1 email habit of the most effective people

I trust that using right tools help managing emails much more effectively. I am using VisioTask (www.visiotask.com) which auto sorts my emails by my task with its context and priority. Priorities are color coded, so I easily see what's important and stay focused rather than respond to everything. The tool has also simple email follow up feature, that helps me keep track of all emails I am awaiting a response to. I can manage hundreds of emails with fewer affort. See if it helps to you too. Regards, Vince.

31
Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro Preview - CNET

Potentially more interesting is that the new Yoga 3 Pro is powered by Intel's also-new Core M processor. This new line, separate from the traditional Core i4/i5/i7 family, is designed for premium laptops, hybrids and tablets that want mainstream processing power. It runs so cool and efficiently that the systems do not need internal fans. With a combination of an Intel Core M processor and up to 256GB of SSD storage, the Yoga 3 Pro has essentially no moving parts inside.

32
The laptop you could fry a steak on - CNET

Trenchevski has come up with a concept for a laptop-style cooking surface he calls the "Electrolux Mobile Kitchen." At first, it seems like a gag, but when you think about how convenient such a thing would be for camping or picnicking in the park, you kind of start to want one. I know I did.

33
Dropbox Dudes Tried to Kick Children Off a Soccer Field

Tech bros will stop at nothing to get what they perceive to be theirs. In the latest example of unchecked hubris, we witness as a squad of adults in Dropbox jerseys argue with and cuss at children over a San Francisco soccer field.

34
Ampy Brings Pocket-Sized Motion Charging To Smartphones

Motion charging is nothing new, but most so far have been clunky pieces of hardware. Kinetic energy charger nPower PEG, for example, is about the size and shape of a rolled up magazine. And before smartphone chargers, you could find this same technology in flashlights you charge by shaking them. But Ampy’s advantage is how small it is. The company claims the way its patented technology is able to be so small is by placing its coils on the circuit board and power transmitter.

35
Amazon to Open First Brick-and-Mortar Site

Amazon.com Inc. plans to open a store in the middle of New York City, according to people familiar with the plans, the first brick-and-mortar outlet in its 20-year history and an experiment to provide the type of face-to-face experience found at traditional retailers.

36
This $99 Headset Could Get All of Us Hooked on VR | WIRED

Carl Zeiss is primarily known for optics; while in truth that only accounts for a small fraction of a multibillion-dollar corporation, it’s the company’s camera lenses we’re most familiar with. Now a small team within the company is leveraging that reputation into a $99 headset called the VR One. And in a move straight out of Oculus’ playbook, Zeiss is entrusting its growth to the developer community.

37
3 Smart Ways to Attract Recruiters to Your LinkedIn Profile

LinkedIn is a great tool for recruiters to find talent, but it’s also a great tool for job seekers to bring eager eyes to their qualifications. To reap the benefits of recruiters relying on LinkedIn more and more, do what you can to improve where you come up when recruiters are searching, and make sure your profile is compelling enough to click. You never now what opportunities might come your way if you set yourself up to be open to them.

38
The 27-Year-Old Who Tells Investors and Reporters What's New in Tech

It's Hoover who brings the Product Hunt conversation to Twitter with a dizzying number of tweets from his personal account each day. And it's Hoover who reaches out to founders and members of the tech industry to participate in the Product Hunt comments. Sometimes he even tips interesting products to reporters and investors. In the process, Hoover has asserted himself as a tech tastemaker, or at the very least a loud cheerleader for whatever the next new thing is — even if that new thing is an app called Yo.

39
7 Celebrity-Endorsed Startups That Totally Bombed | TechCrunch

You have a team. You have funding. You have a product. And you have a celebrity backing your company. What could go wrong? Lots, apparently.  A lot of things can go wrong .

40
Tech Has a Diversity Problem. This Facebook Exec Wants to Fix That | WIRED

If companies like Facebook want to be more diverse, Williams says, it’s incumbent upon them to expand the size and scope of the applicant pool. That way, when they say they’re hiring the best person for the job, they can really mean it. “As far as we’re concerned, our strategy needs to be going to them, instead of expecting we will build it and they will come,” she tells WIRED.

41
The Art of Rejection: Win Respect at Work by Saying 'No'

It’s incredibly normal to feel uncomfortable saying “no” to a boss, supervisor or client, but there are ways to turn someone down while still maintaining a healthy and respectful relationship. The secret lies largely in giving positive, constructive reasons for responding in the negative.

42
One in three jobs will be taken by software or robots by 2025

ORLANDO - Gartner sees things like robots and drones replacing a third of all workers by 2025, and whether you want to believe it or not, is entirely your business.

43
Moto Hint review: is there a future for the Bluetooth headset?

"Hint" is actually a perfect name for Motorola’s little earpiece. It’s not invisible; about half its body sticks out of my ears even after I’ve twisted the little silicon tip (which comes in three sizes) into place next to my ear canal. People notice I’m wearing it, maybe even more than other Bluetooth headsets, but no one’s quite sure what it is. It looks a little like a hearing aid, or at a quick glance could just be a big earring. The Hint exists in an awkward middle ground, actually. We’ve all learned to recognize, roll our eyes at, and forget about people talking into their Bluetooth headsets, but as I wandered around nattering aimlessly with a small rock in my ear, people noticed. And they stared. And they asked what in the world I was doing.

44
Siri Is Considered One Of The Biggest Distractions While Driving, Says Report

The research team used a rating system based on five categories. The lower the accuracy and reliability of voice recognition software, the higher the level of distraction. Low distraction is considered category 1 and high distraction is category 3. Using hands-free voice commands to compose e-mails or text messages were classified as category 3. Listening to e-mails or text messages are category 2. Apple Siri (version iOS 7) was considered category 4 and above, which is the highest level of distraction. The researchers used the same metrics for each system to measure tasks including social media usage, sending text messages and updating calendar appointments. Some of the participants also expressed disapproval with Siri’s “sarcasm and wit.” This chart shows the levels of mental distractions by task:

45
The Case For On-Site Day Care

It would consolidate day care into a highly dense area leaving the remainder of the community to fend for themselves. For example, if Microsoft decided to provide child care for all their employees at various sites throughout the Redmond campus, the current non-MS day cares would start to go out of business. Folks who work for small companies that could never afford or justify on site child care would have very limited options for child care. Probably longer commutes to and even more lost time from work.

46
Mom, Dad: I'm Dropping Out of College to Become a Pro Gamer

Game publishers Riot and Valve have made millions riding the wave of the newest competitive genre, called MOBAs. Their respective games, League of Legends and Dota 2, have millions of players in almost every country around the planet. While these companies run their own internal competitive leagues, there are also third parties that both manage tournaments and broadcast them, such as Major League Gaming in the U.S. and ESL in Europe. Each has a business model that feels like a merger between ESPN and a sports league like the NBA, though they typically manage tournaments for almost a dozen games instead of just one.

47
Laura Poitras’s Closeup View of Edward Snowden

Poitras now had a story, but back in Berlin she and Bonnefoy were still wrestling with two years of previous filming. Wilutzky said, “It was clear that they could make a film only about Snowden, but they wanted to try out if there was another film”—one in which Snowden was “just a little piece in the middle.” Poitras couldn’t bring herself to watch all the raw footage—she was protecting herself from overwhelming emotion. She said of her encounter with Snowden, “There were things that happened that I’ve never experienced before. I saw things in the footage that I had no memory of.” Bonnefoy watched all twenty hours, and afterward had to lie down. “It was clear that here was someone who had decided to sacrifice his life, like a suicide,” she said. Bonnefoy realized that the film had to be Snowden’s. The painful process of what she called “shedding characters” took months. Appelbaum and Assange, central figures in the early stages of filming, receded, while Binney, the older N.S.A. whistle-blower, gained new importance as a Snowden predecessor who had tried to work within official channels and been crushed.

48
How to Stop Life From Passing You By

Yet we’re not doomed to march to time’s relentless beat. Your sense of time is weird and pliable — stretching, compressing, coming to a standstill. And you can mold it, to some extent, to move to your own beat.

49
Chemistry in Ultra HD shows science like you've never seen it - CNET

To start on the path, the creators "used a 4K UltraHD camera and special lenses to capture chemical reactions in astonishing detail without the distraction of beakers and test tubes." Those reactions are compiled in the following video and are broken into six different categories. You might not understand exactly what the chemical symbols mean in each video, but it helps to get Beautiful Chemistry's take on each category, which we've included below.

50
Why privacy matters

Glenn Greenwald was one of the first reporters to see — and write about — the Edward Snowden files, with their revelations about the United States' extensive surveillance of private citizens. In this searing talk, Greenwald makes the case for why you need to care about privacy, even if you’re “not doing anything you need to hide."

51 15 Incredibly Impressive Students At Stanford
52 Estonia Everybody! Freedom Reigned - Official site of Stephen Fry
53 Quiz: Can You Spot Great Design?
54 Why I fell in love with monster prime numbers
55 How HTC plans to sell the quirky, peculiar Re camera - CNET
56 A Week for U.S. History Books: 12 Beautiful Gay Marriage Moments
57 Sony Xperia Z3v Preview - CNET
58 NSA May Have Undercover Operatives in Foreign Companies | WIRED
59 How Peter Thiel teaches Stanford students to create billion-dollar monopolies (in 3 quotes)
60 Life is a Braid in Spacetime - Issue 9: Time - Nautilus
61 5 Can't-Miss Apps: Autodesk Sketchbook and More
62 THE SOCIAL-COMMERCE REPORT: Social Networks Are Driving More Online Sales And Influencing Offline Purchases
63 HTC is lost, and this blind camera isn't helping
64 30 Spooky Snacks for a Frightfully Delicious Halloween Party
65 14 Pinterest Projects That Failed Hilariously
66 The cult of Cthulhu: real prayer for a fake tentacle
67 The Demographics That Make LinkedIn's Audience So Valuable To Businesses
68 Here We Go Again: Kmart Says It Got Hacked, Too
69 Designer Passport: The Colorful Kingdom of the Cheetahs
70 Content Marketing: How to Surpass 90% of the Field in 90 Days
71 Generator Produces 25,000 Watts without Consuming Fuel | MIT Technology Review
72 What It Takes to Be a Professional Voice Actor
73 This Micro Apartment Transforms When You Push A Button To Give You More Space
74 Gunshot Victim Takes A Selfie A Day To Document His Healing
75 Minneapolis' Egg Music cracks a market wide open
76 A veteran teacher turned coach shadows 2 students for 2 days - a sobering lesson learned
77 Rumor: Fox Is Working on a Live Action X-Men TV Series - IGN
78 The Viral Spread Of Ebola Rumors
79 Coming this holiday to Best Buy and Target: The internet of things
80 Windows 10’s very different way of updating
81 Why Marvel Works: A Scholarly Investigation
82 The Design Thinking Behind London's New $4B Subway Trains | WIRED
83 The Best Fitness Trackers Compatible With Apple’s Health App
84 I played ping pong with a robot and it went easy on me
85 Measuring what makes life worthwhile
86 8 Essential Tips to Survive a Breakup Without Deleting Facebook
87 How To Find Solitude In An Era Of Constant Connection
88 Why Leadership Is Like A Three-Legged Stool
89 Everything You Need To Know About iOS 8 Keyboard Permissions (But Were Afraid To Ask) | TechCrunch
90 After Spending A Day With A Lyft Driver, We Can See Why The Taxi Industry Is Scared
91 A tip for media companies: Facebook isn't your enemy, but it's not your friend either