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Hubble's 4K images prove Jupiter's Great Red Spot is shrinking

NASA has released the first images from its Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy program.

Why a Movie Set a Decade Ago Feels Like Ancient History

'Freeheld' shows just how far political organizing has come in the last 10 years—and reminds us of awareness-raising before hashtags.

Uber will now deliver orders from stores in NYC, SF, Chicago

Uber has expanded its on-demand delivery service, UberRush in the US.

NASA shows off new 4K views of Jupiter

New images of Jupiter captured by the Hubble Space Telescope reveal details never seen before, including a newly identifiable filament in the "Great Red Spot" — a hurricane bigger than the size of...

Wii U emulator (almost) runs 'Mario Kart 8' on your PC

Your best bet for playing Mario Kart 8 is still on a Wii U, though.

Google Backs Local Groups to Help Women in Tech Network

As the biggest celebration of women in tech gets under way, a new way for women to build connections that will help build their ranks in the tech industry.

Genius makes homemade Thor's hammer only he can lift, then leaves it lying in the street

Not even Chris Hemsworth could wield this electromagnet powered gadget

Engineer builds 'working' Thor's hammer that only he can lift - CNET

Using powerful electromagnets and a fingeprint scanner, an electrical engineer builds a replica of Thor's hammer Mjolnir that can only be lifted by the worthy.

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Top News
1
The Most Productive Month Of My Life

The first part of the month, I had relatively few comedy shows in the evening—sad for me, but good for sleeping. Waking up is always hard, but after two weeks of 7.7 hours of sleep each night, I felt pretty consistently okay throughout the day, only needing one cup of coffee to get through the day. As my comedy gigs began to pop up on my calendar, I started to get home later, and my average sleep time plummeted to under five hours. At first, I didn't feel much of a difference since I had to be ready and alert for my morning call. But by the end of the month, I felt like I was dragging by midday. And worse, I couldn't get to sleep at night, either. Having an inconsistent sleep schedule can definitely make you feel unproductive, especially if you're already fantasizing about your pillow before lunch. I'll definitely try harder to keep a consistent sleep schedule when I can, but on nights when I'm out telling jokes until midnight, it will remain a challenge.

2
The Internet's Dark Ages

It was worth the effort. Vaughan’s story about the 1961 crash, a 34-part series that spanned more than a month in early 2007, was a sensation. “I don’t want to overstate it,” Vaughan said. “But I feel like it was transformative for the people who went through that tragedy. I’ve had people tell me, for instance, that the series cut loose all this emotion that they had bottled up inside, most of them for their entire lives.” Readers wrote in to say they’d sit at their computers at midnight, refreshing their browsers until the next installment appeared. “It had tremendous impact,” Temple said, recalling a community meeting that drew 800 people in response to the series. “It was a big deal.”

3
Kilogram conflict resolved at last

There is still scope for upset. The teams have until 1 July 2017 to publish further data before the value of Planck’s constant is fixed. Before this deadline, Ullrich’s team plans to use a new batch of spheres from Russia in experiments that he hopes will lead to even more-certain values for Planck’s constant, but could cause the results to diverge again. “Then we would be in trouble,” he says. “But I’m very confident this will not happen.” Newell agrees: “This train has a lot of momentum and there has to be something seriously wrong to derail it.”

4
Google is removing the desktop notification center from Chrome

Google today announced it is removing the notification center from Chrome for Windows, Mac, and Linux. The reason the company is giving for the change is simple: “In practice, few users visit the notification center.” The notification center in Chrome OS will remain.

5
How Facebook knows who you might be dating online

Users of dating apps have expressed concerns about their privacy after their matches appeared as "suggested friends" on Facebook.

6
New 21.5-inch Apple iMac announced with 4K display for $1,499

Just like Apple only brought 5K to its top-of-the-line 27-inch iMac last year, the company is only offering 4K as an option on its most expensive 21.5-inch machine. It'll start at $1,499, while 1080p models will continue to start at $1,099. It's a big jump, but there's also a big power and quality difference between the two tiers. In a brief test of the 4K model, the actual performance seemed like nothing to write home about — the display, however, should be enough to distract you during any unexpected load times. All models are shipping today.

7
The iOS 9 Jailbreak Is Now Available

The jailbreak works for all devices that support iOS 9, including the new 6s and 6s Plus. You can download the jailbreak tool here , and we’ll update this post with a tutorial once we get a chance to run it for ourselves. As usual, you might want to hold off a little bit on jailbreaking since most tweaks and apps won’t be updated for a little while. If you’re curious how the jailbreak’s going for other people, it’s probably a good idea to keep an eye on this Reddit thread .

8
Perch lets you turn nearly any device with a camera into a smart home security system

Because the app is movement-based, you can set it to work with other Internet of Things gadgets, such as smart light bulbs, locks and appliances. Set up is virtually non-existent, so you can take old smartphones or webcams with you wherever you go and create a monitoring system as needed.

9
Internet Companies: Confusing Consumers for Profit

EFF and other digital privacy groups have been actively engaged with the technology sector in an attempt to convince companies to place meaningful limits on various forms of consumer tracking. Earlier this year, EFF, along with eight other privacy organizations, left a multi-stakeholder process intended to develop a privacy-friendly set of best practices for companies using facial recognition, led by the National Telecommunications Information Administration. We insisted that companies must give regular people the choice of whether to participate in a face recognition database, or, in other words, operate their facial recognition systems on an opt-in basis. Our demand isn’t crazy; it is already the law in Europe. But when the companies made it clear that in this country they were only willing to provide an opt-out for people who proactively put themselves on a do-not-track list, we walked out. There was no point to our continued participation in a process dominated by companies who insist on maintaining a privacy model that depends on consumers not knowing their rights, or even the fact they’re being tracked.

10
Home | Newsletters | MIT Technology Review

I would like to receive information about other MIT Technology Review initiatives.

11
The August Lock Is Like a Bouncer for Smart Homes

That’s where August comes in, a smart home company that is trying to upgrade your front door. Last year, August released the August Smart Lock , a helpful device that aims to make keys obsolete. The Smart Lock is controlled by your phone through a Bluetooth enabled app, so you (or the people you grant access to) can lock and unlock your door. This year, August is beefing up its Smart Lock by enabling it with Apple’s HomeKit, meaning you’ll be able to use Siri to lock or unlock your door. In addition to these internal changes, the Smart Lock also gets a few design changes, with a magnetic faceplate concealing the batteries, and a chrome indicator to show whether it’s locked or unlocked. Along with the new Smart lock, August is also releasing two new devices: the August Smart Keypad and Doorbell Cam.

12
Office 2016 for Mac update doesn't include fix for crashes under OS X El Capitan

Microsoft on Tuesday updated Office 2016 for Mac with security patches and a host of smaller feature changes, but did not fix the constant-crash problem users have reported on OS X El Capitan, Apple’s newest operating system.

13
Sony packs even more power into its RX1R II full-frame compact camera

Imaging path. The big technology breakthrough in the RX1R II is fairly subtle: the variable optical low-pass filter. To recap the role of the OLPF , it slightly blurs the image to compensate for interference between the sensor grid and fine textures that cause unsightly wavy patterns and false color artifacts (together, it's called moire ). To date, you've had two choices: buy a camera with an OLFP-free sensor, like the previous RX1R or the Leica Q, or buy one with an OLPF and lose some sharpness. Sony's variable OLPF uses changes in voltage to determine the diffusion power of the filter. So you can determine the balance. Plus, Sony added an OLPF bracketing mode to take advantage of this tech. In addition, the RX1R II upgrades to the same 42.4MP BSI sensor that's in the A7R II.

14
French researchers have figured out a way to hack Siri from 16 feet away — without saying a word

And even if the hack didn’t work for a specific person, that doesn’t mean hackers couldn’t use it effectively on a crowd. If you sent signals out in busy area, you could potentially hack many devices at once, a high percentage of which could potentially be open to attack — especially if people weren’t paying attention to their phones or had them stored in their pockets or purse.

15
Netflix U.S. subscriber additions fall below estimates

Video-streaming service provider Netflix Inc reported third-quarter U.S. subscriber additions below its own forecast, blaming a transition to chip-based cards for the miss.

16
CIOs eye Dell-EMC merger with cautious optimism

CIOs have watched Dell and EMC’s changes from afar, conducting business with the companies while increasing their consumption of cloud services. But the massive merger portends change, even if its nature can't yet be quantified. Finnegan says he's optimistic about the merger means for Orvis, which he says is increasingly adopting a hybrid cloud computing model. Its point-of-sale system remains on premises, but it is in the process of moving its ERP and marketing systems to cloud services. He says he’s looking forward to what Dell and EMC build for a "guy like me that manages on-premises and cloud ... what are the tools and technology that they bring to the table that allows us to manage both really seamlessly?"

17
Google Calls For Translation Help For Refugees In Germany

"In this year alone we have had a fivefold increase in Arabic-language translations stemming from within Germany. Translations are more important now than ever," Google's blog post continued. "And a few well-translated sentences can make a big difference for people in need."

18
Intel's data center business seen rebounding in 2016

Intel Corp's move to cut growth forecast for its highly profitable business that makes chips used in data centers may have disappointed investors, but analysts see the unit rebounding next year as more users take to cloud services.

19
Verizon to unveil next Droid smartphones on October 27 - CNET

While the Droid franchise used to be the face of Android in its early days, other devices such as Samsung's Galaxy S phones and the HTC One are more notable with consumers. But there remains a loyal segment of Verizon customers who continue to buy the phones.

20
Line adds encryption to its cross-platform messaging app

Line has update d its mobile messaging app with a new feature called Letter Sealing that enables end-to-end encryption (E2EE) to protect chats as they’re transmitted between users.

21
The Best Way To Make it to Mars? Go Back to the Moon.

Getting to the Moon was one of the greatest accomplishments in human history. But now, the Moon may be reduced to a mere pit stop for space travelers headed elsewhere. A Mars mission might be much easier, say researchers at MIT, if we use the Moon as a refueling station.

22
Solar Plane Prepares to Soar Over Amazon Rain Forest

The team is fitting its AtlantikSolar unmanned aerial vehicle for a 250-mile, 12-hour flight as it seeks to push the endurance limits of solar planes.

23
New 27-inch 5K iMac teardown confirms support for up to 64GB RAM

OWC also torn down the new 21.5-inch iMac with 4K display and has revealed that the PC comes with soldered memory. This means that your best bet is to upgrade the RAM as much as possible at the time of buying the computer since it cannot be expanded at a later date. The only other thing OWC noted in its tear down of the all-in-one was its noticeably slower startup time compared to the 27-inch iMac that comes with a Fusion Drive.

24
Google Launches Cloud Datalab, An Interactive Tool For Exploring And Visualizing Data

Google today launched Cloud Datalab , a new interactive developer tool for exploring, analyzing and visualizing data with just a few clicks. As Google tells us, the service is meant to help developers “get insights from raw data and explore, share and publish reports in a fast, simple and cost-effective way.”

25
MIT's online master's courses sound like an incredible deal

Move over University of Phoenix, MIT has announced that you can now obtain a highly-regarded Masters degree in Supply Chain Management (mainly) online. The new 14-week credential is called a MicroMaster's and will be open to anyone and once completed students can get a verified certificate documenting their hard work for a small fee. Undertaken via edX , it is the first MITx course that can be put towards the full masters program, meaning the remainder of the course is only one on-campus semester. "The new combination of online courses and one residential semester will open the SCM program to many more learners," said Professor Yossi Sheffi who runs the SCM program and its online components. By making it open to anyone for free the college is recruiting those who are determined and driven, but aren't sure they can afford a traditional Master's program.

26 Citrix Events

Mobile Security Seminar Series

27
Forget the Everything Store—Amazon’s an Everything Business

So, yes, the 21-year-old company would seem to have its hand in everything, from producing Emmy-winning original content to enterprise computing to selling sneakers. Not every endeavor is successful. But like the best tech companies, Amazon knows how to iterate. If one thing doesn’t work, it tries another. And as the Fire Phone showed, it certainly doesn’t wait until its next product is perfect. But it turns out Amazon does have one pretty good gauge of what will become a big seller. If it works for Amazon, it’s going to work for somebody else, too. When you try everything, chances are, you’re going to get something right.

28
Like Startups, Reality Shows About Them Fail Early, Fail Often

The creators of these shows say they are riding an increase in public interest into what it takes to build a company. “Millennials are coming of age without jobs or prospects, so they realize that they have to create their own jobs,” said venture capitalist Timothy Draper, the star of “Startup U,” which follows startups through the Draper University accelerator, a seven-week school for young founders. “Entrepreneurship creates jobs. It is the golden goose.”

29
First Data Prices IPO Shares at $16 Each

At its IPO price of $16, First Data has a market value of about $14 billion. The offering is an important one for KKR & Co., as First Data ended up being the private-equity firm’s biggest equity bet. At that price, KKR’s stake is valued at $4.5 billion, or about 15 percent higher than its $3.9 billion investment. The payments processor sold 160 million shares for $16 apiece, according to a statement Wednesday, after offering them for $18 to $20 each.

30
Shopify and Uber Reinvent Local Shipping – Shopify

We’ve partnered with Uber to do what once seemed impossible—make affordable, reliable same-day delivery a reality for even the smallest business. With Shopify and UberRUSH, your customers can get their online orders in hours not days, making last minute online shopping convenient and impulse buying irresistible.

31
The Swatch smartwatch is more disappointing than anyone could have imagined

According to Bloomberg , the Swatch Bellamy is a basic timepiece that will debut in China next year for 580 yuan, or about $91, before making its way to Switzerland and the United States. Its sole technological element will be a near-field communication chip that lets users make payments with the watch instead of a credit card. Hayek had previously touted the watch’s 9-month battery life, which doesn’t seem like a major feat given the apparent lack of a display and processor. (Chinese site Sina.com also obtained an image of the not-so-smartwatch .)

32
Tesla's Model S Has New Autopilot Tech--And I Just Sat Behind The Wheel

Tesla invited a few journalists to its Palo Alto headquarters Wednesday to test-drive the new features. Trying it out is admittedly a bit unnerving. Driving on highway 280, I found myself reaching for the wheel when turns in the road appeared, something the car was capable of handling on its own, and it did with ease. Lane changes bring up a similar semi-anxious feeling, but happen more smoothly. The Tesla employee I rode with has been testing Autosteer for several weeks, and says that feeling fades fairly quickly once you start to trust the car. He uses the feature during his daily commute, and says it’s made the drive much less stressful and allows him to enjoy the scenery when driving rather than focusing on traffic.

33
Wasteland 2: Director's Cut Review - IGN

I'm much less in love with the "complete visual overhaul" the Director's Cut brings. Comparing the two versions side by side, it's easy to see that inXile remade each level down to the smallest detail, introducing new textures and populating formerly sparse maps with additional environmental objects. The catch is that most of the time the Director's Cut merely looks different and not necessarily better. I'm thinking, for instance, of a decrepit trailer found early in the game, where a merchant named Wormy Jim cautiously hawks his wares. The rocks and trees surrounding his home look more real now, as a result of the shift the the Unity 5.0 engine. The ground around him is parched and sandy in this release, with asocial clumps out grass scattered about rather than the green blanket found in the original. It's a step up, no doubt, but I admit I wouldn't have noticed anything was different had I not taken the time to compare the two. That extends to the character models, which may outshine their 2014 predecessors in detail by still look simple and muddy up close. For all the work that's been done, Wasteland 2 still looks like a game that's from several years ago.

34
Tesla's Model S Now Has Autopilot Features--And I Just Sat Behind The Wheel

Tesla invited a few journalists to its Palo Alto headquarters Wednesday to test-drive the new features. Trying it out is admittedly a bit unnerving. Driving on highway 280, I found myself reaching for the wheel when turns in the road appeared, something the car was capable of handling on its own, and it did with ease. Lane changes bring up a similar semi-anxious feeling, but happen more smoothly. The Tesla employee I rode with has been testing Autosteer for several weeks, and says that feeling fades fairly quickly once you start to trust the car. He uses the feature during his daily commute, and says it’s made the drive much less stressful and allows him to enjoy the scenery when driving rather than focusing on traffic.

35
Apple turns to Twitter for official Apple Music tech support

Users who need help with the newly launched Apple Music subscription streaming service can now turn to an Apple-controlled Twitter account for technical support. The official @AppleMusicHelp account went online on Wednesday, offering live assistance for Apple Music users during set hours. The account is advertised as active seven days a week, from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Pacific Time. Apple representatives controlling the account have thus far requested more details via Twitter direct message from users seeking assistance. The new account joins the official Beats by Dre Support presence on Twitter, which debuted in July. Though Apple has a number of specialized Twitter accounts, including a newly launched profile dedicated to App Store games , it still does not have a main @apple account. Chief Executive Tim Cook and other company executives are, however, on Twitter with personal accounts .

36
Apple facing huge chip patent bill after losing case - BBC News

The University of Wisconsin successfully claimed that Apple used its microchip technology without permission in some iPhones and iPads.

37
Playlab Lands $5M To Capitalize On Southeast Asia’s Growing Mobile Games Market

Playlab , a Hong Kong-registered mobile games firm that is focused on Southeast Asia, has landed a $5 million investment from Monk’s Hill Ventures in one of the largest game-focused deals in Southeast Asia to date.

38
IBM's Watson Analytics offers new data discovery tools for everyday business users

Pushing forward in the race to get analytics tools into the hands of non-technical users, IBM is unveiling Wednesday new offerings in its Watson Analytics line: data-discovery models called Expert Storybooks, new connectors to a range of data sources and more secure connections to corporate data.

39
Why Are We So Obsessed With Productivity?

The problem is that tasks like generating new ideas require many different modes of engagement. For one, reading about areas that are not directly related to a company’s projects can provide bases of knowledge that might ultimately prove useful in solving a new problem. In addition, walking away from the problem for a while and doing something else is often required to allow ideas to percolate (or incubate). That means that activities that look unproductive (or at best tangentially relevant to a job) may actually be crucial for long-term success as an innovator. Measuring the time people spend on a particular task may not be a good guide to their ultimate success in finding innovative solutions to problems.

40
SanDisk is reportedly eager to sell itself off

SanDisk is a mainstay of the storage world thanks to its memory cards and solid-state drives , but you might not see its name for much longer: Bloomberg sources hear that SanDisk is exploring the possibility of selling itself off. The company is reportedly talking to both Micron and Western Digital about a potential deal, although there's no guarantee that anything will happen. You shouldn't expect an acquisition in the immediate future, at any rate. SanDisk runs memory factories alongside Toshiba, and it'd likely have to get approval before changing that partnership.

41
Filter Out Certain People, Dates From Facebook's 'On This Day'

"We know that people share a range of meaningful moments on Facebook — from celebrating good times like a birthday to getting support in tough times like the passing of a friend or relative," a Facebook spokesperson said in a statement. "As a result, everyone has various kinds of memories that can be surfaced—good, bad and everything in between. So for the millions of people who use On This Day, we've added these filters to give them more control over the memories they see."

42
Amazon shutters Destinations site after six months - CNET

The Seattle online retailer has a reputation for diving into new markets and experimenting with services, which don't always work out. Among one of its most prominent failures, the company last year built a smartphone, the Fire Phone, but it didn't take off with customers and resulted in millions of dollars in losses. Amazon Destinations was a smaller effort that was just starting to be developed. The service faced heavy competition against established players in the online travel business, including TripAdvisor, Airbnb, Expedia, Groupon and other sites.

43
The Secrets of Punctual People

Being on time means being prepared for the unanticipated. "I always double the amount of time Google tells me it will take to get somewhere," says Alexandra Lee, senior vice president of strategy and partnerships for the creative studio Crush & Lovely. "Inevitably a subway is late, or there’s bad traffic and I can’t find a cab."

44
Buying a copy of The New York Times now gets you digital access for that day

The New York Times is launching a new experiment; buy a physical copy of the paper from any newsstand, and you'll be gifted full, unbridled access to NYTimes.com and the company's mobile apps for that same day. This marks the first time the Times is offering "day passes," as they're being called, and is meant to "provide newsstand customers with a similar benefit to that of home delivery subscribers." (Subscribing to the paper gets you 24/7 digital access.) It's also intended to showcase the worth of the Times ' vast digital presence to people who've made reading the paper part of their daily routine. That said, it's not like the company is having trouble hooking online readers; earlier this year, the Times passed a significant milestone: 1 million digital-only subscribers.

45
Google acquires Divshot to up its Web hosting game

Divshot has been associated with Firebase for a while now; its technology is used to power Firebase Hosting services. The company has released a migration guide to help existing customers move their projects to Firebase.

46
Square Files For IPO On $560.6M In Half Year Revenue, Slim $77.6M Loss

As expected, Square has filed to go public . The financial transactions shop reported in its S-1 document that during the first half of 2015, it had revenue of $560.6 million, and a loss of $77.6 million. Those numbers compare favorably to the year-ago six-month period during which Square reported $371.9 million in revenue, and a slightly steeper $79.4 million in losses.

47
The Next Web on Twitter

Square has filed for an IPO, will list in NYSE as $SQ http://tnw.me/BR1uXqh  pic.twitter.com/4hCEvq2MeX

48
PCMag on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

49
How Much Does Lack Of Sleep Really Affect Your Work?

In the November productivity issue of Fast Company , we highlighted a study that showed that the sweet spot for adults is 7.76 hours of sleep, while those who get only five hours or snooze for 10 hours are more likely to not perform as well at work. To test just how much the amount of sleep you get affects your memory, motor skills, and more, we conducted a very unscientific study with three Fast Company staff members. Watch the video to see how our sleep-deprivation office-task obstacle course went.

50
The Verge on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

51 Microsoft sells out of Surface Book launch stock, updates iOS Health app for Band 2
52 LinkedIn launches Referrals site to let employees recommend their contacts for new jobs
53 California launches site to help 'revenge porn' victims fight back
54 Disney is helping make Star Wars and Marvel prosthetics for kids
55 Elon Musk might design an electric plane someday
56 Loan Platform Kabbage Raises $135M At A $1B Valuation, Grows Credit Line to $900M
57 Chrome finally kills off the HTTP-HTTPS “mixed content” warning
58 A 3D-printed car that can charge your 3D-printed house
59 IBM adds to Watson Analytics with Expert Storybooks, connectors to Oracle, Salesforce, Microsoft Azure, AWS
60 Twitter layoffs spark recruiting frenzy on (where else?) Twitter
61 Netflix is blaming slow US growth on the switch to chip-based credit cards
62 August 'smart lock' maker ships Siri-enabled locks
63 Marvel's Agents of SHIELD: "A Wanted (Inhu)man" Review - IGN
64 Checkr Is Raising $30M+ For Its Background Checking API, Y Combinator Investing
65 The Apple Watch is now being sold at B&H Photo
66 You can now make purchases with Capital One’s mobile wallet
67 Tesla says journalists snuck into Gigafactory and assaulted its employees
68 Samsung launches the Z3, a $130 Tizen-based smartphone designed with India in mind
69 Netflix is getting destroyed after earnings
70 UberRush Goes Live in Chicago and San Francisco
71 Apple seeds OS X El Capitan 10.11.1 beta 4 to developers and public testers
72 Surface Book laptop preorders sell out on Microsoft's site
73 Square’s IPO Filing Lists Jack Dorsey’s CEO Role At Twitter As A Risk Factor
74 The Verge on Twitter
75 Bring on the learning revolution!
76 The transformative power of classical music
77 Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
78 The power of introverts
79 Join the free private social network for your neighborhood.
80 Your Wimpy Commute Has Nothing on China's Ridiculous 50-Lane Traffic Jam
81 Looks aren't everything. Believe me, I'm a model.
82 Try something new for 30 days
83 The secret to desire in a long-term relationship
84 How equal do we want the world to be? You'd be surprised
85 Free cross-platform UI kit for Photoshop and Sketch
86 Artist JeeYoung Lee Converts Her Tiny Studio Into Absurdly Elaborate Non-Digital Dreamscapes
87 What I've learned from my autistic brothers
88 Teens, Technology and Friendships
89 Americans’ Attitudes About Privacy, Security and Surveillance
90 Vote Now: Who Won the First Democratic Presidential Debate?
91 A second opinion on developmental disorders