Top Videos
Does Google think its Nexus can compete with iPhones? - CNET

Technically Incorrect: The launch of the Nexus 5X has seen a strong TV presence and a new commercial focus on the actual product.

American Horror Slack: An "AHS: Hotel" Recap For Cord Cutters, Boob Blood Included!

Angela Bassett is coming for Lady Gaga. Naomi Campbell, we hardly knew ye. To the Slack room we go!

Here is a pigeon wearing a bagel

A Redditor posted a picture of a pigeon wearing a bagel around its neck .

Supergirl is no Kryptonian rom com, but it’s full of goofy charm

Last spring, SNL aired a spoof of Avengers: Age of Ultron that roundly mocked how Marvel — and, by extension, much of Hollywood — might approach stories about female superheroes. It was a cutting...

A Selfie-Helper, and Other Apps You Should Be Using

A selection of new apps we're really digging this week.

This DIY visualizer grooves to music playing around you

This nifty Arduino project combines music and tinkering: build a visualizer that reacts to any song playing in your surroundings.

In an ever-changing world, family-owned Wiffle Ball, Inc. is a constant

The market is always changing, but this American icon sticks to what it knows -- and what works.

Scientists Connect Brain to a Basic Tablet—Paralyzed Patient Googles With Ease - Singularity HUB

For patient T6, 2014 was a happy year. That was the year she learned to control a Nexus tablet with her brain waves, and literally took her life quality from... read more

Rockapella reunites to sing the 'Carmen Sandiego' theme song

Rockapella swings by to sing the 'Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego' theme song, joined by band co-founder and Sean Altman.

Baby deer won’t leave caring human who saved her

She refuses to walk away from love.

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Top News
1
Egypt hunts for hidden pyramid chambers with cosmic rays

A muon-scanning cosmic ray lab, similar to the type that peered inside Japan's Fukushima reactor , will be set up in Egypt to aid with the scans. Muon particles come from deep space and penetrate much deeper than, say, X-rays, so they're particularly good at finding deep underground voids that could indicate a chamber or tunnel. Such scans are fairly low-resolution and take weeks to complete, however. "A similar attempt was made 30 years ago, but this is the first project at a global level using cutting-edge technology to look inside the pyramids," said a French researcher participating in the project. "The idea is to find the solution to the mystery of the pyramids."

2
Halo 5: Guardians review: Everyone’s a hero, no one’s a hero

A new villain known as the Warden picks up a ton of slack with a monstrous vocal performance, full of the kind of brutal teasing and emotional manipulation you want in a grandiose action film's lead baddy. Cortana's return, however, is dogged by a total lack of believability. Saying more would spoil her plot line, but in short, her sloppily written lines won't fool anybody. Most of the game's voice acting comes from Locke, and the blame for his forgettable turn as a lead hero must be split equally between too-rigid dialogue and stilted acting.

3
A Vladimir Lenin statue has been transformed into Darth Vader

Vladimir Lenin is not very popular in Ukraine these days. There are still lots of statues left over from the Soviet days, but they're slowly being taken down — or in this case , retrofitted into more inspirational figures from the capitalist mythos. With Vader-interest peaking as Lenin-interest tails off, it's hard to say it's not an improvement.

4
Acer is launching an electric all-terrain vehicle

Acer might be better-known for its range of laptops, tablets, phones, and similar consumer electronics, but it has quietly lifted the lid on a brand-new product line — an electric, all-terrain vehicle (eATV).

5
Artificial intelligence can go wrong – but how will we know?

Most of the smart systems you read about use machine learning. It’s just one area of artificial intelligence – but it's what you hear about most, because it's where we're making a lot of progress. That’s thanks to an Internet full of information with metadata; services like Mechanical Turk where you can cheaply employ people to add more metadata and check your results; hardware that's really good at dealing with lots of chunks of data at high speed (your graphics card); cloud computing and storage; and a lot of smart people who've noticed there is money to be made taking their research out of the university and into the marketplace.

6
You are your smartphone

Welcome to the new identity. An increasing number of services don't care about your password, your signature or even your mailing address. If you've got the authenticated phone, you're you.

7
Canada’s New Government May Be a New Beginning for Science

Canadian scientists have been making do for nearly a decade, in the face of funding cuts, federal lab closures, and a blanket gag order on government researchers. For them, the fall of Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s Conservative government in the October 19 national election wasn’t just a relief—it was the rough emotional equivalent of blowing up the Death Star. And the fact that Liberal leader Justin Trudeau won with a surprise majority government, avoiding the mess and gridlock of power sharing, was like having dreamy Han Solo emerge from the explosion and sign on to be your lab partner.

8
Apple sued over iOS 9's eagerness to chew up cellular data

Not happy that iOS 9's WiFi Assist feature is quietly gobbling your iPhone's cellular data for the sake of boosting your WiFi performance? You're not alone -- and you might get compensation for your troubles. A California-based couple has filed a class action lawsuit accusing Apple of doing too little to warn iPhone owners about WiFi Assist's data use. Allegedly, the guide it posted in response to concerns about the feature doesn't cut the mustard. It "downplays" the kind of overage charges you could rack up after upgrading to the newer iOS revision, according to the complaint.

9
Dressed To Kill: Every Bond Girl Outfit Collected In One Infographic

Perhaps the most striking aspect of the women the patriarchy encourages us to call Bond Girls is their delightfully dumb names. Whether it's Pussy Galore, Octopussy, or the equally improbably Dr. Christmas Jones, apparently James Bond can only be distracted/seduced by the most conspicuous people on the planet. The other most striking element of Bond Girls is that they are often deadly sirens, luring men in with their charms and then, at least in the case of Goldeneye's Xenia Onatopp, crushing windpipes with their thighs. A new infographic takes a close look at every Bond Girl's main weapon of misdirection: her slinky outfit.

10
LG's dual-screen V10 phone reaches AT&T and T-Mobile this week

When LG promised that its unique V10 smartphone would reach the US soon after its Korean launch, it wasn't kidding around. Both AT&T and T-Mobile have announced that you can order the dual screen, dual-selfie cam device this week -- October 27th and 28th, respectively. The AT&T version comes in black or opal blue, and will cost you either $250 on a two-year contract or $29 per month on a similarly lengthy installment plan. You'll get a 200GB microSD card, an extra battery and a charging cradle if you order quickly, too. The T-Mobile model doesn't come with those perks, but it's potentially cheaper at $25 per month (on a two-year payment plan) or $600 outright. Just be prepared to wait a little while if you insist on trying the V10 in-store. T-Mobile won't carry it until October 30th, and you'll be waiting until November 6th to see it at an AT&T shop.

11
Apple is facing a class-action lawsuit over Wi-Fi Assist

As surfaced by Apple Insider , Apple was hit with a class-action lawsuit on Friday, October 23, in the state of California. The plaintiffs are William Scott Phillips and Suzanne Schmidt Phillips, and allege that because of costs related to data overages picked up due to the use of Wi-Fi Assist, the “overall amount in controversy exceeds” $5 million.

12
Microsoft Surface Pro 4 review

And then there’s Microsoft’s brand new Surface Pen, which provides yet another way to interact with the computer (and is actually included in the box with the Pro 4, unlike the Type Cover). The Pen works with new technology in the Pro 4’s display to provide a better writing experience than the older version. It’s pressure sensitive (1,024 levels, to be exact), has a really great drag on the screen, and feels more like writing with a real pen than ever before. I’m no artist, and it still may not work for demanding sketchers, but I like it a lot for discretely taking notes. The other cool thing about the Pen is that it now includes an eraser on its top side that lets you quickly erase whatever it is you just wrote or scribbled. It’s very easy and natural to use. The Pen will also now magnetically snap to the side of the Pro 4, which is great for storing it while the computer is on your desk, but terrible when you toss the Pro 4 in a bag and the pen pops off and settles to the bottom with all of the old gum wrappers, lint, and other detritus.

13
Man tells cops he killed friend for turning into a zombie

is a leading global media company that informs, inspires and entertains the digital generation. Mashable is redefining storytelling by documenting and shaping the digital revolution in a new voice, new formats and cutting-edge technologies to a uniquely dedicated audience of 45 million monthly unique visitors and 25 million social followers.

14
Bacon and other processed meats cause cancer, says World Health Organization

Bacon, ham, and salami have today received the ignominious label of foods that cause cancer, according to the latest report from the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer. They're part of the processed meat group, which has now been "classified as carcinogenic to humans, based on sufficient evidence in humans that the consumption of processed meat causes colorectal cancer." Reviewing a body of scientific literature spanning more than 800 studies, the IARC team were confident in asserting a causal link between processed meat — that which has been cured, salted, fermented, smoked, or otherwise "transformed ... to enhance flavour or improve preservation" — and the occurrence of cancer in those who consume it.

15
Go behind the scenes of 'Spectre' on Snapchat's James Bond channel

It gives users a look at behind-the-scenes footage from the movie, an insight into the making of Sam Smith’s title track for the film and messages from the cast.

16
The Most Controversial Hacking Cases of the Past Decade

“It’s a poorly written statute that doesn’t effectively define the main thing it seeks to prohibit,” says Tor Ekeland , a New York-based defense attorney who has worked on a number of controversial CFAA cases. “There are ambiguities surrounding that definition that allow prosecutors wide latitude to bring charges under theories that shock computer people in the infosec community. Combine that with the fact that there is this general paranoia about hackers—it’s a sort of hysteria that’s on par with the hysteria about witchcraft.”

17
Watch out! You're going to start seeing a lot more Tesla autopilots on the roads

Whether you think that Tesla’s recently introduced Autopilot feature that allows the Model S to basically drive itself is a wonderous feat of technology or a sure-fire way to make the roads more dangerous , you’re about to start seeing an awful lot more Tesla drivers around the world cruise by with their hands off the wheel.

18
Eyes on the prize: Spectrum auction to pave the way for UK's 5G mobile future

“There will not be a cap on the amounts bidders can buy. Ofcom believes that any cap could prevent a bidder from buying large blocks of adjacent spectrum. Large blocks have the potential to support very fast download speeds, meaning even faster mobile broadband for consumers, which helps pave the way for 5G,” Ofcom says.

19
Jeremy Kaplan on Twitter

The web made 'em famous, politics made 'em vanish. The full story: http://bit.ly/1Rx223u  #GreatReads pic.twitter.com/fqKouLMr1G

20
Verizon asks FCC for waiver to enable Wi-Fi calling features

I remember only a short time ago Verizon making fun of T-Mobile for this because 'they didn't need to use wifi calling on their strong network' or some sort of nonsense like that... my my... how times have changed. �You'd think giving customers better service would be a priority w/ these companies. �I mean, come on, the less people use your cel network, the more coverage/frequencies available to those who do need it. �If this is supported widely in densely populated areas like NYC, think of the additional channels opened up for those of us walking along the street. �

21
Google Reveals Its New "RankBrain" Artificial Intelligence System

Google has just gone public with the details of a new artificial intelligence called RankBrain, which the search giant is using to handle difficult queries. The system is being used on what one Google research scientist calls a "very large fraction" of the search queries handled by Google. RankBrain helps Google decipher the approximately 15% of phrases that the search engine has not encountered before, Bloomberg reports.

22
Need a secure password? Ask this 11-year-old girl

Should you trust the password she sends you? Modi says there’s only one copy of every password she delivers, and they “are sent by US Postal Mail which cannot be opened by the government without a search warrant.”

23
Yahoo: The Moment of Truth Is Near

Turnaround remains elusive, even as the day draws closer when its Alibaba stake won’t be there to protect it

24
Expectations for Apple's Q4 2015 earnings

The economy in China has started slumping lately. Tim Cook defended the faltering economy this week saying, “China is a superb place to be.” If China’s economy slips too much though it will be bad news for Apple which is depending on the country to fuel most of it’s growth in iPhone sales, now that the U.S. and European markets are saturated.

25
BroadwayHD streaming service brings the theater to you

There's no doubt live and on-demand streaming services are the future of entertainment. Knowing that, BroadwayHD is launching a new product with video content from over 100 theater performances. The digital service, created by two stage producers , features a vast library of previously recorded shows that are being distributed in a Netflix-esque way. You'll find stage productions like Memphis , Romeo and Juliet , Copenhagen and Jekyll and Hyde, as well as a variety of others in categories including classics, comedy, drama and musicals. BroadwayHD offers an annual access tier for $170, or $15 per month, while two-day rentals can be purchased for $8. At the moment, there's no app for the service , but its mobile site does support both AirPlay and Chromecast -- and you could always watch on your laptop or desktop, of course.

26
New York's Attorney General probing state broadband speeds

For an industry obsessed with accuracy, it seems hilarious that the broadband speeds that you pay for are so vague and ill-defined in reality. It's a situation that has angered New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman (pictured), so he's launching a statewide probe into users internet speeds. Reuters is reporting that the official is targeting the state's big three providers, Verizon, Cablevision and Time Warner to see if, as he says, "many of us may be paying for one thing and getting another." The three firms have all been sent letters asking them to provide all disclosures made to customers about speed, as well as the details of any internal testing that they carry out.

27
Siri won't answer some questions about music charts if you aren't subscribed to Apple Music

It has recently been brought to the attention of many that Siri, with all the access to knowledge banks, will keep some of that knowledge to herself if you aren’t subscribed to Apple Music. Specifically, asking the digital personal assistant questions related to music, like, “What’s the most popular song in the U.S. today,” will trigger this response, or one similar to it:

28
'Star Wars: The Force Awakens' will come to Netflix... in Canada

According to Variety , Disney has an exclusive output deal with Starz in the U.S. that runs until the end of 2015. This means that Disney titles with theatrical releases through that date will be hosted on Starz after they leave multiplexes.

29
Funding Daily: Today’s tech funding news, in one place

Here’s a list of today’s tech funding stories, updated as the day unfolds. Tip us  here if you have a deal to share.

30
There are two kinds of tech people — which are you?

Rocha's blog doesn't just cover tech topics, but our favorite posts focus on the hilarious ways that people use tech differently. Which kind of person are you?

31
Apple TV now available for preorder, first deliveries arrive Friday

It is 2-4 Nov delivery in the UK as of 15-20 mins ago (no option for expedited delivery). Accessories page is still empty but it is featured in the main page itself on the Apple Store App. I am skint now but if I to buy one, I'll go with 64GB with Nimbus controller (or skip it altogether if I can use my bluetooth PS4 controller instead), the loop band and perhaps the Apple TV bracket (currently empty in the store but the placeholder�is there).

32
Religion and Science

On a handful of energy issues, religious affiliation is just one of several factors that help to predict people’s views. For example, public attitudes about offshore oil drilling are strongly related to political party affiliation and ideology. But there also are differences in views by age, gender and religious affiliation, even when differences in political orientation are held constant. For example, both evangelical and mainline Protestants are more likely than religiously unaffiliated Americans to support more offshore drilling, with other factors held constant. Further, U.S. adults with a religious affiliation, such as Protestants, Catholics, Jews and Muslims, are more inclined than those with no particular religious affiliation to believe that mankind will be able to stretch natural resources such that the growing world population will not pose a major problem.

33
A look inside the mind-boggling world of Ford Motor Co. apps

Next month at the Web Summit in Dublin , Ford says it will be showing off some new in-car apps, among which will be one that reads your Twitter and LinkedIn feeds aloud via the magic of voice control.

34
I shopped at a bookstore for the first time in a year and loved it

We’re getting better and better at building technology to bring more convenience to our lives, and I’m all for that. But unless we detach ourselves from our digital umbilical cord every now and again, experiencing the most human of acts — to walk around a space and to be surprised and delighted by what we might find — we’re at risk of losing something we’ll find difficult to get back.

35
Test drive: Apps like Uber are opening up entirely new advertising channels for car makers

Test drive opportunities are usually only available to users for a very limited window of time (i.e. a day or two, or even just a matter of hours), but they help generate buzz, allow drivers (and potential buyers) to get behind the wheel of new models — sometimes even before launch — and give car makers an opportunity to exploit an entirely new advertising channel brought forth by the rise of the on-demand economy.

36
6 Habits Of People Who Accomplish Everything On Their To-Do Lists

Good says you also need to look at your list within the context of the day. If you’ve got a day filled with meetings or need to spend time on a big project with a looming deadline, you simply can’t expect to plow through as many tasks as you would if you have a few free hours. Map out your day according to the time limitations you have, so you can plan to do various tasks within the appropriate windows you have, she says.

37
The Verge on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

38
God Damn You to Hell, The Walking Dead

You can’t give people second chances. You can’t leave enemies behind you. Mercy can get you killed. You can’t protect the weak. It’s all stuff Rick has been saying, living, knowing ever since he left the prison. So when Rick gets back to the Winnebago and drives it to where he’s hoping the others will be coming out of the woods, when he hears gunshots coming from Alexandria, he has no compunction about telling the others they have to stay on their job. “We have to hope they can take care of it themselves,” he says pragmatically. If they aren’t strong enough, they’ll die. But as he said in the premiere, some people weren’t meant to live in this world.

39
Microsoft's Elite controller is like a sports car: tool for pros, status symbol for the rest

I would like a sports car. I don’t know how to drive a stick, am confused by fuel variety, and have no plans to visit a speedway, because the last thing I want to risk is damaging the majority of my annual income. A sports car is clearly not made for me, but I want the sports car nonetheless. It looks cool, it embodies status, and the potential of its power is as important — if not more important — than its application.

40
Tesla Model S reportedly saves woman, child in landslide

(By Stephen Edelstein, Green Car Reports) —  Carmakers like to talk enthusiastically about good crash-test results, but they can seem somewhat abstract compared to real-world crash damage.

41
Prince blesses Instagram with his presence, calls it Princestagram

is a leading global media company that informs, inspires and entertains the digital generation. Mashable is redefining storytelling by documenting and shaping the digital revolution in a new voice, new formats and cutting-edge technologies to a uniquely dedicated audience of 45 million monthly unique visitors and 25 million social followers.

42
Silicon Valley's opposition to cybersecurity bill mounts as US Senate prepares to vote - CNET

Jen Ellis, vice president at cybersecurity company Rapid7, said a law that sets guidelines for information sharing could avoid a loss of trust if it were written carefully and included strong civil liberties protections. She doesn't believe CISA is that bill. What's more, privacy advocates and tech companies will likely never be comfortable with a bill that wipes out liability for companies that share customer information, she said. That provision might appeal to retailers and banks, but not the Apples and Dropboxes of the world.

43
Halo 5: Guardians review: An old friend

It marks a significant evolutionary step for Halo's multiplayer arsenal and will likely stand out as Halo 5's legacy. At the same time, Warzone can feel a bit overwhelming, so I'm glad I really wound up liking the 4-on-4 Arena mode offerings in the game -- the Slayer and other classic styles I mentioned above. These are modes I'm definitely going to play and attempt to become competitive in when the game goes public. The maps feel good and the online experience was solid with no signs of lag or drop-off. Of course that could change when 100,000 players decide to jump on at once. There's a satisfying amount of player customization too, which has been par for the course in Halo multiplayer for a while.

44
​Game of drones: How airborne delivery tests are starting to take off | ZDNet

With Amazon cleared to test drone deliveries, and DHL in Germany and Swiss Post also running trials, Finland is the latest country to conduct a pilotless airborne mail pilot.

45
Exclusive: Wal-Mart seeks to test drones for home delivery, pickup

The FAA will review Wal-Mart's petition to determine whether it is similar enough to earlier successful applications to be fast-tracked, or whether it would set a precedent for exemptions, requiring regulators to conduct a detailed risk analysis and seek public comment, agency spokesman Les Dorr said. The FAA normally aims to respond to such petitions in 120 days.Amazon has said it would be ready to begin delivering packages to customers via drones as soon as federal rules allow.

46
How Making A Movie Is Like Launching A Startup

And that brings me to this four-part series. Over the next few weeks I’ll tell you the story behind our movie—its humble origins, working out a concept, preproduction, casting, the shoot, post-production, and much more. What I learned, among many other things, is that making an indie film is a lot like launching a startup. And let's face it: Many people would love to make a movie, or launch a startup, or both. My hope is that when you finish this series, you should have a much better idea how.

47
Facebook adds Royal Bank of Scotland to its Facebook At Work feature - CNET

The bank believes Facebook At Work, which is still in a test mode, helps its workers exchange information and ideas faster, McNamara said. Facebook At Work will be rolled out to 30,000 of the bank's employees by March 2016 and then to the company's remaining 70,000 workers by the end of next year, he added. McNamara said it didn't take much persuasion for RBS employees to begin using it.

48
Everything you think you know about addiction is wrong

What really causes addiction — to everything from cocaine to smart-phones? And how can we overcome it? Johann Hari has seen our current methods fail firsthand, as he has watched loved ones struggle to manage their addictions. He started to wonder why we treat addicts the way we do — and if there might be a better way. As he shares in this deeply personal talk, his questions took him around the world, and unearthed some surprising and hopeful ways of thinking about an age-old problem.

49
You can grow new brain cells. Here's how

Can we, as adults, grow new neurons? Neuroscientist Sandrine Thuret says that we can, and she offers research and practical advice on how we can help our brains better perform neurogenesis—improving mood, increasing memory formation and preventing the decline associated with aging along the way.

50
Why We Can't Solve Big Problems | MIT Technology Review

The Apollo program, which has become a metaphor for technology’s capacity to solve big problems, met these criteria, but it is an irreproducible model for the future. This is not 1961: there is no galvanizing historical context akin to the Cold War, no likely politician who can heroize the difficult and dangerous, no body of engineers who yearn for the productive regimentation they had enjoyed in the military, and no popular faith in a science-fictional mythology such as exploring the solar system. Most of all, going to the moon was easy. It was only three days away. Arguably, it wasn’t even solving much of a problem. We are left alone with our day , and the solutions of the future will be harder won.

51 Here's What Really Happened at That Company That Set a $70,000 Minimum Wage
52 The surprising science of happiness
53 My life in typefaces
54 What my religion really says about women
55 Clear Food - The Hot Dog Report
56 Human trafficking is all around you. This is how it works
57 Evil week News, Videos, Reviews and Gossip - Lifehacker
58 We Have Reached the Future – Will We Ever Return to the Past? - OpenMind
59 Remember the Guy Who Gave His Employees a $70,000 Minimum Wage? Here’s What Happened Next.
60 ​Giant Squid Babies Found for the First Time
61 How fear drives American politics
62 Americans’ Views on Open Government Data
63 The Superconductor That Works at Earth Temperature | MIT Technology Review
64 Americans’ Views on Mobile Etiquette
65 Man Who Was Never Born Fathers a Child
66 13 TED Talks full of weird facts about life
67 Channel 9: Videos about the people building Microsoft Products and Services
68 12 Social Media Marketing Trends for Small Business
69 Windows 10: The best tricks, tips, and tweaks
70 The Textbook Is Dying. Meet the Artificially Intelligent Software That’s Replacing It. 
71 TNW Apps
72 This Professor Is Making Arteries With an Off-the-Shelf 3D Printer
73 How to Master the Art of Looking Busy
74 Why we need to end the War on Drugs
75 Twitter Unveils A New Set Of Brand-Centric Analytics
76 Powerful earthquake strikes Afghanistan, Pakistan, killing more than 260
77 Picobrew takes a stab at automated counter-top homebrew beer
78 The Largest Photo Of Space Is So Huge, We Can't Even Show It To You
79 5 new technologies that help disabled and bedridden people experience the world again
80 The Myth of Basic Science
81 NASA assembles unprecedented scientific team to find out if we’re all alone
82 Striking photo series transports mechanics into Renaissance paintings
83 The Surface Book's best hidden feature is its upgradability
84 Switzerland Offers Counterpoint on Deflation’s Ills
85 Cleaners throw away an art installation that looked like trash
86 Watch adorable lion cubs get their first checkups at the zoo
87 4 reasons Singapore is poised for success as a global hub for content creators
88 Open up these fortune cookies and you'll find an adorable tiny cat
89 Cadillac's Cyclone used a radar to prevent crashes way back in 1959
90 'Halo 5: Guardians': It's Time To Kill Off Master Chief