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Elon Musk: 'We are summoning the demon' with artificial intelligence - CNET

While he believes smart machines can take us to Mars and drive our cars for us, Musk remains worried that artificial intelligence holds a darker potential.

Gravity Visualized

Dan Burns explains his space-time warping demo at a PTSOS workshop at Los Gatos High School, on March 10, 2012. Thanks to Shannon Range from the Gravity Prob...

Action-packed 'Ghostbusters' remix will get you dancing - CNET

In honor of the 30th anniversary of "Ghostbusters," remix masters Eclectic Method pay tribute to Zuul, Slimer, the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man and the fellas themselves.

Watch the trailer for 'Furious 7,' Paul Walker's final film

The trailer reveals what looks to be another action-packed installment in the 'Fast and Furious' franchise.

iFile is now compatible with iOS 8, iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus

iFile is the best way to browse the entire iOS filesystem on your jailbroken iPhone or iPad, with supports for viewing all file types, including images, documents, plists, and also installing .deb packages. It has been one of our favorite … Continue reading →

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Top News
1
SkylinkNet Alarm System Starter Kit review - CNET

Set the system to Arm Away, and you'll get a customizable "Exit Delay" that gives you time to leave before the system actually arms. The hub will beep during this time, with the beeps growing faster as the system draws closer to arming. As for Arm Home mode, it's a pretty common feature with security systems like these, and one that's nice to have if you want to activate some of your sensors while you're home, but not all of them.

2
Richard Branson says 'the dream lives on' after Virgin Galactic crash

After some delays, the company had planned to launch its first space tourism flights sometime next year at a cost of $250,000 per seat, but yesterday's accident has shuffled those plans. Branson did not clarify the nature of the "inflight anomaly" that led to the crash, but the accident killed one of the two test pilots. He has been identified as Michael Alsbury, 39,  according to The Los Angeles Times . The other pilot, who was seriously injured by the crash, has not yet been named.

3
This Ad Shows Just How Romantic The Internet Of Things Can Be

Home automation tech brand WeMo and agency CP+B put a romantic spin on the potential of Internetting your stuff and your life with this new ad. Here we meet Rachel, who comes home to a Rube Goldbergian assembly of web-enabled devices--from the stereo and lights to the crock-pot and TV. It's all an elaborate anniversary gift from her husband Dan who can't be home for the occasion.

4
Microsoft to Update Office for Mac Next Year; Mac Outlook Gets Refresh Now

A public test version of the new Office for Mac is due in the first half of next year, with the final release planned for the second half of the year. It will come as a free update for Office 365 or as a paid version for those who prefer not to get Office on a subscription basis.

5
How to tell if your iPhone is Haunted!

Folks at Joy of Tech have created a pretty awesome comic strip for Halloween to help you find out if your device is haunted. Some of my favorites are:

6
Virgin Galactic’s tourist spacecraft crashes, kills co-pilot

In addition to Virgin Galactic’s internal investigation, the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating the events that led to the crash. At the time of the crash, only four men were cleared by the FAA to fly the SpaceShipTwo. WhiteKnightTwo, the craft that accompanies SpaceShipTwo during the launch process, was able to land safely today during the test flight.

7
Marvel Confirms Movies for Black Panther, Captain Marvel, Avengers: Infinity War, More - IGN

Marvel boss Kevin Feige held court at a big announcement event in Los Angeles today, where he unveiled the dates and titles for a bunch of upcoming Marvel films. And they are amazing.

8
LG smartphone sales soar, boosted by G3

LG reported Wednesday that operating profit in its mobile communications business soared in the third quarter, boosted by sales of its premium LTE smartphones. Shipments were up 39 percent year-on-year, boosted both by the G3 and the cheaper L series phones such as L Bello and L Fino.

9
The internet is fucked (but we can fix it)

Here’s a simple truth: the internet has radically changed the world. Over the course of the past 20 years, the idea of networking all the world’s computers has gone from a research science pipe dream to a necessary condition of economic and social development, from government and university labs to kitchen tables and city streets. We are all travelers now, desperate souls searching for a signal to connect us all. It is awesome.

10
Avengers: Age of Ultron Trailer - IGN

What else is there to say? Check out the first Avengers: Age of Ultron trailer!

11
Tim Cook Speaks Up

I don’t consider myself an activist, but I realize how much I’ve benefited from the sacrifice of others. So if hearing that the CEO of Apple is gay can help someone struggling to come to terms with who he or she is, or bring comfort to anyone who feels alone, or inspire people to insist on their equality, then it’s worth the trade-off with my own privacy.

12
The Rise and Fall and Rise of Virtual Reality

J: Absolutely. This gets to my last book about that stuff. To my mind, there are a few proposals that are on the table that are interesting. The one that I’ve been trying to push the hardest was the origin point for networking when it started — Ted Nelson’s idea of the universe of micropayments. The thing about micropayments is they have to be really universal or else there are only tiny pockets of people who get anything and everyone else gets frustrated and pissed off. It has to be big enough to really send some benefits around to everybody. That’s a hard gap to leap over to get to that point. Facebook has a very tough road to hoe here because they have no background in this stuff. Neither does Oculus. They are kind of starting from scratch, but I certainly wish them the very best success. What they can do is create a system where anybody who wants to can set up a super easy system for micropayments and then add to it. They might see this exploding economy that generates a lot of economic growth, a lot of profit, and a lot of distributed benefits for their users.

13
Samsung Galaxy Note Edge review

But beside all of this, the most important thing to know about the Galaxy Note Edge is that while it does feel like a crazy, experimental device, it’s also just a really solid smartphone. It’s based on the Galaxy Note 4, the latest in Samsung’s pioneering line of gigantic phones, and also the company’s best smartphone to date. There are a couple of differences: the Note Edge’s screen is a tenth of an inch smaller at 5.6 inches diagonal, and the battery is a little less capacious at 3000mAh. Although the Note Edge always made it through a full day, I wasn’t as impressed with its endurance as David was with the Note 4’s; this appears to have been an issue with some international versions of the Note 4, too, so mileage may vary worldwide.

14
12 Other Characters Who Have Lifted Thor's Hammer Mjolnir - IGN

In this hypothetical tale, Thor was transported back in time to the Hyborian Age. With no memory of his previous life, Thor fell in with Conan and began leading the life of a thief/reaver/slayer. Conan always was good at multitasking. Eventually, Conan's nemesis Thoth-Amon caught wind of the amazing weapon in Thor's possession and tried his best to harness Mjolnir's might for himself. In the aftermath of the battle, Thoth-Amon was burned to a crisp and Thor lay dying of his wounds. He passed Mjolnir onto Conan, making it probably the one time in Conan's career he happily dabbled in magic.

15
Science Graphic of the Week: How Magic Mushrooms Rearrange Your Brain | WIRED

Perhaps some aspects of consciousness arise from these meta-networks—and to investigate the proposition, the researchers analyzed fMRI scans of 15 people after being injected with psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, and compared them to scans of their brain activity after receiving a placebo.

16
Google[x] Reveals Nano Pill To Seek Out Cancerous Cells | TechCrunch

This project is in the exploratory phases but Conrad was hopeful that we’d be seeing this technology in the hands of every doctor within the next decade. He also mentioned that his team has explored ways of not just detecting abnormal cells but also delivering medicine at the same time. “That’s certainly been discussed,” he said, but cautioned that this was something that needed to be carefully developed so that the nanoparticles had a chance to show what was happening in the body before destroying the cells.

17
YouTube Can Now Play Videos At A Buttery 60 Frames Per Second | TechCrunch

Sometime in the past few hours, however, it seems the roll out started spreading far and wide. A good number of user uploaded videos shot at 60 FPS are now playing back at their proper framerate, rather than being sliced down to a relatively chunky 30 FPS.

18
Apple iMac with Retina 5K display review

Every once in a while, a gadget completely resets the curve. Once I started wearing good, expensive headphones, I suddenly couldn’t even tolerate Apple’s EarPods anymore. When I first grabbed my friend’s BlackBerry because I needed to answer an email, I knew instantly I wasn’t going back to texting with T9. I drove an Audi and never looked at my Saturn the same way again. Remember the first time you used a capacitive touchscreen, threw your 56k modem out the window and switched to broadband, or switched from standard-def TV to 1080p?

19
Why It Took 23 Years to Link Amelia Earhart's Disappearance to This Scrap of Metal | WIRED

Conspiracy theories abound about the fate of Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan. Some say Earhart was captured by the Japanese or that she found her way back to the US and lived out her life as a New Jersey housewife, Gillespie said. His team’s hypothesis is that Earhart and Noonan were trying to find Howland Island, but after failing to do so, they landed on a reef extending out from Nikumororo, also known as Gardner Island. For days, the pair sent out distress calls from the aircraft’s radio, but the rising tides soon pushed the plane over the edge of the reef and into the ocean. The team thinks Earhart and Noonan survived for a while on the island as castaways.

20
What’s Behind the Great Podcast Renaissance?

Another reason that podcasts may be growing is that the economics are compelling. Producing an average podcast costs far less than producing a TV show or a radio show (all you really need is a microphone or two, a copy of Audacity or some other editing software, and a cheap hosting service for the audio files themselves). And the advertising rates on a successful podcast are big enough to pay for the costs many times over. Several top podcasters told me that their CPM (the cost to an advertiser per thousand impressions, a standard ad-industry unit) was between $20 and $45. Compare that to a typical radio CPM (roughly $1 to $18) or network TV ($5 to $20) or even a regular old web ad ($1 to $20), and the podcast wins. Podcasts can charge higher ad rates because of the personal nature of the single-host format — as an advertiser, it's far better to have "Serial"'s Sarah Koenig reading your copy out loud than to burst in with a prepackaged ad that nobody will pay attention to.

21
11 eye-popping bars from around the world

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 40 million unique visitors worldwide and 19 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

22
Fitbit Charge, Charge HR and Surge unveiled: Hands-on with Fitbit's new wearables - CNET

I'd suggest you skip the Charge and wait for the Charge HR instead: it costs just $20 more at $150 in the US, £120 in the UK, or $180 in Australia. Plus it feels nearly the same, but adds new 24-hour heart rate tracking technology that sounds worth waiting for. Called PurePulse, the band continually monitors heart rate whether you're asleep or awake, and funnels the results into Fitbit's app. Resting heart rate is calculated while sleeping, and used to help generate target heart-rate zones during workouts.

23
The Top 25 iPhone and iPad Games - IGN

80 Days is the best interactive fiction experience on the App Store. Much like the original Jules Verne story, the year is 1872 and Phileas Fogg has undertaken a wager to circumnavigate the globe with his loyal French valet Passepartout in 80 days or less. But unlike the classic story, developer Inkle’s world take on 1872 is a magical and rolicking Steampunk-inspired adventure with submersible ocean-crossing trains, massive walking cities, mechanical camels and more. 80 Days has 150 cities to explore, each with their own unique, hand-written side-adventures. But a single playthrough will only take you to 20 or so locations, allowing you to play through the entire game more than 5 times without ever seeing any of the same encounters. Fall in love. Get into fights. Get arrested. Take the Transsiberian Railroad or the Orient Express. The choice is yours. - Justin Davis

24
Beyond recognition: the incredible story of a face transplant

For Carmen Tarleton, the day started out normally enough. Tarleton, 45, had errands to run, a piano lesson to get to, a house to tidy. Tomorrow was Valentine’s Day, and for the first time in a long time — the first time since the attack five years earlier — she looked forward to spending it with a new boyfriend. And then everything changed. The phone rang, and Tarleton’s surgeon gave her the news: after more than a year of searching, doctors were optimistic that they’d finally found her a new face.

25
Google's redesigned Gmail app supports Yahoo and Outlook accounts

A leaked video demonstrates the new Gmail app, and Google notes within it that more than just Gmail, Yahoo, and Outlook.com accounts are supported. It appears that Exchange ActiveSync is supported, as in the Android mail client, which could spell the end of switching between mail clients on Android for most users. Yahoo and Outlook.com are a welcome addition for Android users, and it’s a move from Google that may also help keep phone makers bundling apps like Gmail with devices.

26
The 20 Scariest Google Street View Sightings

Reddit user nafaaan shared this image of the ruins of Hashima, a Japanese island that has been uninhabited for nearly 40 years. Once a mining town with more than 5,000 residents, Hashima was abandoned in the 1970s and is now deemed unsafe for tourists to visit -- even though it's the site of Javier Bardem's lair in Skyfall .

27
The TheTechNewsBlog Daily

The TheTechNewsBlog Daily, by TheTechNewsBlog: updated automatically with a curated selection of articles, blog posts, videos and photos.

28
Jammed

Things have changed. For starters, there has been tremendous consolidation in the last-mile wired marketplace. Just three providers, Comcast, Verizon, and Time Warner, account for almost half of the wired last-mile access marketplace in America. End-users, encouraged by access providers interested in replicating the pay TV model online, now ask for far more data than they generate. And the architecture of U.S. Internet access encourages this passive downloading behavior: the cable modem Internet access network, on which most Americans rely, substantially favors downloads over uploads. The three major last-mile providers also have nationwide networks of their own, which means that they do not have to rely as much on transit networks to carry traffic throughout the U.S. You can think of Comcast’s eyeball network as a giant castle surrounded by a giant moat. Inside the castle are all of Comcast’s territories in thirty-nine states. Outside the moat is the rest of the Internet, including all the transit networks carrying traffic requested by Comcast subscribers. Finally, the entire high-speed Internet access marketplace has been deregulated, meaning no level of government exercises oversight over the castle — or the terms on which the castle allows the moat surrounding it to be crossed.

29
Why Innocent People Plead Guilty by Jed S. Rakoff

Third, and possibly the gravest objection of all, the prosecutor-dictated plea bargain system, by creating such inordinate pressures to enter into plea bargains, appears to have led a significant number of defendants to plead guilty to crimes they never actually committed. For example, of the approximately three hundred people that the Innocence Project and its affiliated lawyers have proven were wrongfully convicted of crimes of rape or murder that they did not in fact commit, at least thirty, or about 10 percent, pleaded guilty to those crimes. Presumably they did so because, even though they were innocent, they faced the likelihood of being convicted of capital offenses and sought to avoid the death penalty, even at the price of life imprisonment. But other publicized cases, arising with disturbing frequency, suggest that this self-protective psychology operates in noncapital cases as well, and recent studies suggest that this is a widespread problem. For example, the National Registry of Exonerations (a joint project of Michigan Law School and Northwestern Law School) records that of 1,428 legally acknowledged exonerations that have occurred since 1989 involving the full range of felony charges, 151 (or, again, about 10 percent) involved false guilty pleas.

30
In The Wake Of Tragedy, Canadians React To Islamophobia With A Satisfying Punch In The Face

Stereotypes exist in our minds and that is not going to change anytime soon unless everybody on the planet is compelled to take a course in social psychology. Many of my friends were Muslims in college as the city I lived in has a significant Muslim population. Both sides -Muslims and non-Muslims know that there are fundamentalists who are highly active and that that number is growing in some parts of the world. In the same city, just yesterday a terrorist group was found to be recruiting online in the name of ISIS - the investigation was detailed in a newspaper article. They are also now recruiting techies and other highly educated individuals who are unfortunately being lured by "religion".

31
Behind boxing's brain damage crisis

At 46, "Terrible" Terry Norris has the lean, muscled frame of a former pro boxer. He’s just a little taller than average, with a thick, black Van Dyke framing a bright smile. Gray creeps in at the edges of his beard, but his shaved head seems the only concession to age, a paring away of the intricately razored box cut of his heyday, now some 20 years gone. These days, he teaches cardio boxing in a converted garage north of Hollywood; upstairs, he shares a loft with his wife, Tanya, who also teaches and runs his gym. During classes he looks fit and powerful, his fists still preternaturally fast. Only when he speaks, in a low, raspy murmur bordering on unintelligible, do you wonder at the damage he’s suffered.

32
Everything you need to zombie-proof your life (pictures) - CNET

You hear low moaning and the shuffling of slow feet. No, it's not the line at the Apple Store on iPhone release day. That zombie apocalypse we've been hearing so much about is finally here. You're not worried, though. You have a concrete safe house, a zombie-proof bike, a survival kit and death-scented cologne to hide you from the undead. We've rounded up everything you need to coast through zombie Armageddon.

33
Is the world starting to turn against Bill Cosby?

Author Mark Whitaker omitted rape allegations from his new biography of Cosby , and the book was still widely  praised for giving a comprehensive look at Cosby’s life. When HuffPost Live host Marc Lamont Hill asked Whitaker why he failed to mention the rape allegations in the book, for which he had Cosby’s cooperation, Whitaker answered: “In these cases, there were no definitive court findings, there were no independent witnesses, and I just felt, at the end of the day, all I would be doing would be, ‘These people say this, Cosby denies this.’ And as not only a reporter but his biographer, if people asked me, ‘What is the truth? What do you think?’ I would be in the position of saying, ‘I don’t know,’ and I just felt uncomfortable.”

34
Ambulance drone delivers help to heart attack victims - CNET

"Some 800,000 people suffer a cardiac arrest in the EU every year, and only 8 percent survive," he said. "The main reason for this is the relatively long response time of the emergency services (approx. 10 minutes), while brain death and fatalities occur within four to six minutes. The ambulance drone can get a defibrillator to a patient inside a 12 km2 zone within one minute. This response speed increases the chance of survival following a cardiac arrest from eight percent to 80 percent."

35
I typed my entire BlackBerry Passport review on the phone's tiny keyboard

Once you do, however, it's actually a surprisingly good handset -- the best BlackBerry 10 smartphone so far. It's well-built, comes with clever engineering and software services, has good battery life and features a screen that's easy to read outdoors. But the one-handed experience is also incredibly awkward; the keyboard isn't among BlackBerry's best (typing a 4,700-word review on the thing convinced me of that); and the company continues to struggle in its quest for a thriving and more robust ecosystem. (The fact that it has three methods of obtaining apps and still can't get the biggest titles is a testament to that.) For what it is, it's a solid device. But the problem is figuring out whom it's for, and why it matters. My sore thumbs and I haven't found an answer yet.

36
Here’s What Google’s LEGO-Style Phone, Project Ara, Looks Like Right Now | TechCrunch

It’s been a few weeks since we’ve heard much about Project Ara, Google’s effort to build a phone out of components that can be swapped out, piece-by-piece.

37
Alienware's got a massive $300 dock for your new graphics card

We know what you're thinking: What the hell is a "graphics amplifier"? (Some of you smartasses are probably also wondering if it goes to 11 .) In fact, it is what it sounds like: The Amplifier, a new accessory from Alienware, is a big ol' shell that lives on your desk, with room for nearly any desktop-grade GPU (anything up to 375 watts). Once you get that set up, you plug the thing into your gaming laptop via a cable and boom, your notebook is suddenly running off a desktop-grade GPU, not the mobile one that came built inside the chassis. As a bonus, the Amplifier also has four powered USB ports, so you can also use this as a docking station for your keyboard, mouse, monitor, et cetera. And yes, that glowing Alienware head on the front has customizable lighting. Of course it does. Gallery | 11 Photos Alienware Graphics Amplifier hands-on + See all 11 Gallery | 4 Photos Alienware Graphics Amplifier

38
GOG Brings X-Wing, Tie Fighter And Other LucasArts Classics To Your Modern PC | TechCrunch

All the LucasArts games, which also include Knights of the Old Republic, Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis, The Secret of Monkey Island and Sam & Max Hit The Road, are DRM-free. They only appear on the platforms they originally supported, however, so you’ll need a Windows machine to enlist in either the Rebel Alliance or Imperial navy. Spec requirements are predictably low, however, so even emulated Windows machines should be able to partake.

39
Snoop Dogg, Investor

With his new sideline, Snoop is following other celebrities-turned-tech benefactors, like Ashton Kutcher, who seek to use their investor status as part of their overall brand. Snoop's financial endeavors elicit particular attention because of the cognitive dissonance. It's weird seeing the entertainer best known for recreational drug use donning a Ralph Lauren sweater vest and Warby Parker glasses in a picture with Google CEO Larry Page (see below). Snoop is the embodiment of a certain kind of gangster-rap, drug-hazed cool, and tech is for nerds.

40
Tim Cook explains why the iPod Classic had to die

It was the best question pitched to Apple CEO at WSJD's Live conference: Why was the iPod discontinued ? Apparently it's a very simple reason: "We couldn't get the parts any more," explained Tim Cook. "They don't make them any more." While the iPod Classic isn't exactly a creaky transistor radio just yet, that's how it went down. "We would have to make a whole new product.... the engineering work to do that would be massive." The difficult truth that some of you probably don't want to hear: "The number of people who wanted it is very small." So pour one out for the iPod Classic -- and hit up eBay if you're still craving a clickwheel.

41
What Role Does Technology Play in Record Levels of Income Inequality? | MIT Technology Review

“One of the largest and most prominent debates in social sciences is the role of technology in inequality,” says David Grusky, director of Stanford’s Center on Poverty and Inequality. But “one fact that everyone agrees on,” he says, is that the income gaps between those with different levels of education “account for a good share of the inequality.” And, he says, “we know what the solution is. It’s equalizing access to high-quality education. The problem is that we just pay lip service to it.” The issue is not, as many suggest, the overall quality of education, he argues: “We have fine schools. For example, Palo Alto High School is a fine school. But everyone needs access to these types of schools. Everyone should have access to the kind of schools we routinely provide middle-class kids.” (Local governments, using property taxes, supply an average of 44 percent of the funding for elementary and secondary schools in the United States, helping to fuel the disparity in educational investments between poor and rich communities.)

42
Scientists make can your inner monoglue audible

When you hear someone else speak, specific neurons in your brain fire. Brian Pasley and a bunch of his colleagues discovered this at the University of California, Berkeley. And not only that, but those neurons all appeared to be tuned to specific sound frequencies. So, Pasley had a thought: "If you're reading text in a newspaper or a book, you hear a voice in your own head," so why can't we decode that internal voice simply by monitoring brain activity. It's similar to the idea that led to the creation of BrainPort , which lets you "see" with your tongue. Your eyes, ears or vocal chords don't really do the heavy lifting, it's your brain. And if you can give the brain another source of input or output you might be able to train it to approximate a lost ability like speech.

43
20 captivating slow-mo videos made on the iPhone 6

Naturally, proud new owners of the devices did what any tech-lover would do, testing out the new features and posting them to the Internet for all to see. Check out some of our favorite slow-mo videos, below:

44
In 2014, countries are still paying off debt from World War One

In 1953, following the end of the Second World War, West Germany agreed at a conference in London to pay off its debts from before World War II, and in return was allowed to wait until reunification before paying €125 million in outstanding interest owed from 1945-1952. In 1990, the Berlin wall fell and Germany started paying off that interest—the very last of which was paid in October 2010 on the 20th anniversary of reunification.

45
Huh? Mini phone attaches to the phone you already have - CNET

Another benefit of the tiny phone is that after it's juiced up using its own little charger, it can hold that charge for quite awhile -- the makers claim it'll run for 100 hours of standby and 2.5 hours of talk time. So if you're going to be away from power outlets for a while and only need a phone with you -- and not the portable computer most of our phones have become -- you'd be all set with this little guy once you swapped in your SIM card from your main phone. The same holds true in the event your main phone runs out of power and you need to make a call.

46
No Need To Bring Water On Your Bike Ride, This Bike Sucks It Up From The Air

The system is designed for places like Lima, where 1.2 million people live without running water. It can also work through most of the rest of South and Central America, along with large swaths of Africa and Asia, says the inventor. Basically, anywhere that's hot and humid enough will work; most of North America and Europe would not. Kristof hopes to reach some of the 2 billion people around the world who live in water-scarce areas.

47
2 Years Ago Sandra Fluke Was Called a Whore. Now She Wants Your Vote.

On a recent September night, Fluke speaks from a stage much smaller than the Democratic National Convention. In fact, there is no stage. She sits at a modest table in the community room of Fire Station 5 in L.A.’s Westchester neighborhood. Seated beside her for an hour-long debate is Ben Allen, a Democrat and Fluke’s opponent in the election to represent the 26th State Senate district. They don’t discuss lofty national politics. They discuss smaller, local issues — state ballot propositions, L.A.’s shoddy public transit system and when L.A. Unified School District teachers earn tenure.

48
Hands On With Microsoft’s New Fitness Wearable, The Band | TechCrunch

Dropping out of left field like a foul fly ball from the Kansas City Royals this week, the Microsoft Band was a surprise. Part fitness band, part computer, part mobile Twitter and stock-checking smartgadget, the Band is a mix of things.

49
Tim Cook says he's 'proud to be gay'

Tim Cook has long topped lists as the "most powerful" gay person in the world, and today he's publicly addressed his sexuality for the first time. "Throughout my professional life, I've tried to maintain a basic level of privacy," the Apple CEO says in a letter published by Bloomberg Businessweek . "While I have never denied my sexuality, I haven't publicly acknowledged it either, until now. So let me be clear: I'm proud to be gay, and I consider being gay among the greatest gifts God has given me."

50
Crash test dummies are growing to match obese Americans

The new dummies will tip the scales at 271 pounds and have an obese body mass index of 35. A typical dummy currently weighs in at 167 pounds and has a healthy BMI — a size that no longer reflects the proportions of many Americans. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 35% of Americans are obese, which it defines as being 5 feet 9 inches tall, weighing 203 pounds or more, and having a BMI of 30 or higher. As the numbers on the scale go up, the likelihood that someone can survive a crash goes down.

51 Hackers Are Using Gmail Drafts to Update Their Malware and Steal Data | WIRED
52 At least 29 superhero films are coming in the next 6 years
53 15 New York City attractions for people who hate people
54 staltz/introrx.md
55 Fitbit’s Latest Activity Trackers Feature Heart Monitoring, Smartwatch Functions | TechCrunch
56 Reading the heavens with your phone
57 'It's A Bit Of A Gift': Yusuf Islam On His Break And Return To Music
58 Slack Confirms $120M Fundraise Led By Google Ventures And KPCB At $1.12B Valuation | TechCrunch
59 If you don’t like algorithmic filters, you’re probably not going to like the future of Twitter
60 Proof that teens were painfully awkward even in the 1960s
61 4 Brands That Built Empires Without Traditional Advertising
62 A Tale Of Many Besties
63 This Scientist Has A Surprising Idea For Protecting Football Players
64 How to Anonymize Everything You Do Online | WIRED
65 Why Facebook Just Launched Its Own 'Dark Web' Site | WIRED
66 Watch Chris Meloni Squash "Beef" In a New Web Series From "Burning Love" Alumni
67 GOP Gains in Key Senate Races as Gender Gap Narrows
68 How To Push Past That Terrifying Dip In Motivation
69 The utopian invisibility of design and connectivity
70 If Smart Design Can't Make It In Silicon Valley, Who Can?
71 5 important things to know about security in Android 5.0
72 3 power-sipping monitors lower energy bills
73 Is that Bill Gates staring back at you from Outlook 2010?
74 This 1980s General Motors Touchscreen Was Decades Ahead Of Its Time
75 Second Life Creator Philip Rosedale Is Building a Virtual World Where Your Avatar Mirrors Your Facial Expressions | MIT Technology Review
76
77 The kindest cut: my journey into the nether regions of male birth control
78 Destiny: The Dark Below Expansion Release Date and Details - IGN
79 How The Fastest-Growing Companies Use Technology
80 Mark Zuckerberg Knows Chinese, But It's A Long Road To Export Facebook
81 Lenovo Y50 Touch 4K review - CNET
82 This thing uses sound to make any wine taste better - CNET
83 Dial up the brightness with these 100W replacement LEDs - CNET
84 Sharp Aquos Crystal (Boost Mobile) review - CNET
85 About.me Launches 'Intro' App to 'Reinvent the Business Card'
86 iOS and Android hold 96% global market share in Q3 2014
87 Xur Exotic Weapon Merchant - Destiny Wiki Guide - IGN
88 5 trends coming to the smart home in 2015
89 Apple ‘iPhone’ trademark challenged in India by iVoice Enterprises with its ‘iFon’ mark
90 Inbox, Paper, And Sway: Why Tech Giants Are Suddenly Reinventing Their Core Apps
91 5 Effective and Free Publicity Tools for Crowdfunding
92 9 Steps To Being A Better Boss
93 How to Correct a Social Media Blunder
94 The Invention of the Equals Sign | WIRED
95 Condo at the End of the World