Top News
1
Saurik declares iOS 8 - iOS 8.1 jailbreak is 'stable enough'; enables the ability to buy tweaks on Cydia

The Pangu jailbreak for iOS 8 – iOS 8.1 may not be ready for prime time when it was released couple of the weeks back, but one must give credit to the Pangu Team and saurik for releasing a series of updates to fix most of the issues.

2
Cory Doctorow: Information Doesn’t Want To Be Free

One thing we know about audiences is that they aren’t very interested in hearing excuses about why they can’t buy the media they want, when they want it, in the format they want to buy it in. Study after study shows that overseas downloading of U.S. TV shows drops off sharply when those shows are put on the air internationally. That is, people just want to watch the TV their pals are talking about on the Internet—they’ll pay for it if it’s for sale, but if it’s not, they’ll just get it for free. Locking users out doesn’t reduce downloads, it reduces sales.

3
will.i.am - home

Technology is infused into the world of will.i.am as an essential element.  It powers everything that he does. As the Director of Creative Innovation for Intel, will.i.am conceptualizes the next frontier of interactive technology by acting as an idea generator.  Earlier this year,  will.i.am debuted the first song on another planet, premiering his song, “Reach for the Stars” from Mars to mark the successful landing of NASA’s Curiosity rover.  His interest in the interplay between digital photography and augmented technology, will.i.am also created the i.am+ foto.soho, an iPhone case that dramatically improves the quality and social aspects of the built-in camera.    

4
Health Insurance Marketplace: Enroll for 2015 Healthcare Coverage

Before you apply for coverage, learn what you need to know about the Marketplace and find out if your income may qualify you to save money on coverage Remember, Open Enrollment for 2015 coverage runs from November 15, 2014 to February 15, 2015.

5
New York Deputy Slaps Citizen for Not Allowing him to Search Car (Updated III) - PINAC

Ooooooooooo…. Ok. I’m bery glad that ended that way, and not the way it would have ended had it been ME that had been slapped like that. Let me tell you what. All police officers out there reading this, let me have a minute of your time here… Let me advise you on a little tid bit of information. There are people out there, such as myself and MANY like me, who not only carry a pistol concealed, but are also trained in extreme close quarters combat, and are trained, HIGHLY, to be ruthless, thoughtless, reactionary killers. We are trained that in the event of an attack to our person, our response is much like a doctor tapping a mallet on your knee. it just happens. There’s nothing we can do about it. It’s reflex. It’s burned into our heads so much that happens before we can think about it. In this case, Mr. Slappy officer would have had a broken arm, a broken jaw, a crushed nose halfway on it’s way to the base of his brain stem, a major concussion, and a massive rear of his head laceration from hitting the concrete in less than 1 1/2 seconds.

6
Inside The Strange And Disturbing Listings On Alibaba.com

Rather than pull every Alibaba listing—there are hundreds of millions—he chose a handful of minor categories that struck him as interesting, and scraped the data using a Python script. Within each category, he displays results by price. The grab-bag assortment—including products that fall under "quality drugs," "giant inflatable animal toys," and "silicon ingots"—highlights the challenges that Alibaba faces as a public company, subject to regulation, operating a wide-open global marketplace.

7
How Exercise Changes Your Brain To Be Better At Basically Everything

Research has long shown that the hippocampus, a squishy seahorse-shaped region found on both sides of the brain that's essential for learning and forming memories, becomes highly activated during exercise. But recent studies have revealed new, more complex and nuanced ways in which exercise activates and affects the brain.

8
Out with the air: Bridgestone shows off tires you never have to inflate - CNET

At the Paris Motor Show here, Bridgestone showed off a second-generation prototype of its Air Free tire, which replaces conventional tires' cushion of air with an array of shock-absorbing resin bands that resemble thick, angled spokes. The outside of the airless tire is coated with a replaceable tread made of a thin band of solid rubber.

9
Reshma Saujani’s Ambitious Plan for Technology

IN MID-AUGUST in New York City, 20 of Saujani’s foot soldiers are working frantically to finish their final projects as graduation looms at the end of the week. In an airy, converted basketball court inside the headquarters of the ad tech giant AppNexus, they gather in knots around computers at long tables, their excited chatter broken by an occasional burst of laughter. For the past few days, mostly collaborating in groups, they’ve been drawing on the coding skills they’ve acquired this summer—classes run five days a week, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.—to build an original, functional app or website they’ll present to their peers, parents, and counselors and executives from host companies at the graduation ceremony. The program’s 375 students nationwide are doing the same thing at three other Girls Who Code locations in New York (at Goldman Sachs, AT&T and Barry Diller’s InterActiveCorp), at eight locations in California (including Facebook and Twitter campuses and Intel’s center at Stanford)and at spots in Boston, Miami and Seattle (where Microsoft, Google and Amazon host programs).

10
Electronic Medical Records, Built For Efficiency, Often Backfire

Many of those things are an everyday reality in doctors' offices and hospitals across the country. But a survey of more than 400 internists with experience using electronic medical records, or EMRs, documents what doctors have complained about for years: computerized records chew up a lot of time.

11
Let’s Call The Amazon Echo What It Is

But just be clear on why Amazon would want to build something like this. Amazon doesn’t want to be a destination anymore; they don’t want to be something you have to go to; they want to be ubiquitous. They want their store “front end” to be floating in the ether all around you, just waiting for you to open your mouth.

12
Millennials Will Become The Majority In The Workforce In 2015. Is Your Company Ready?

“It’s interesting because I think the companies that have the huge advantages are the smaller ones now,” offers Dan Schawbel, managing partner at Millennial Branding. “The Procter and Gambles of the world, for them to go back in time, it’s very hard. It’s definitely doable and they are making changes, but if you’re a new startup and you’ve got funding, you can start a new culture that supports people your age.”

13
Pluto.TV - Watch What's Possible

LOADING 100+ FREE CHANNELS ...

14
Why scientists are in a love-hate relationship with 'Interstellar'

It turns out that one of the three planets orbits very close to the black hole, so close there will be severe relativistic effects. Relative to a distant observer, time slows down near a black hole (true), so one hour on the planet will equal seven years elapsing back on Earth. Right away, this is a big problem. To get that kind of time dilation (a factor of about 60,000), you need to be just over the surface of the black hole, and I mean just over the surface, practically skimming it. But because of the way black holes twist up space, the minimum stable orbit around a black hole must be at least three times the size of the black hole itself. Clocks would run a bit more slowly at that distance than for someone on Earth, but only by about 20 percent. In other words, for the planet to have the huge time dilation claimed in the movie, it would have to be too close to the black hole to have a stable orbit. Bloop! It would fall in.

15
10 Habits That Make Everyone Hate You On Social Media

The faux hubble brag, often as part of always selling your 'personal' brand, is pretty icky and most everyone sees thru the bs, knows you're just blowing your own horn. Ala bandwagon jumping (#8) there's click and link baiting; too many hashtags; posting content w/out giving credit where due; over-asking for shares, likes. Really there's a lot of heavy-handed maneuvering to SM when it should just be a natural, digital extension of your real self. Hopefully the better version anyway. FWIW.

16
The 'Internet of Things' Will Be The World's Most Massive Device Market And Save Companies Billions Of Dollars

The 'Internet of Things' Will Be The World's Most Massive Device Market And Save Companies Billions Of Dollars

17
3 Ways To Be Happier At Work

There’s a common assumption, he says, that you will be happy when you are successful. But the reverse is actually true, and not just anecdotally. Hard neurological science supports the idea that happy people have more capacity to succeed. And beyond that, that happiness is not a genetic mandate, or a product of circumstance. It’s a choice. Here, Crabtree boils this choice down into three opportunities for change that can make people happier. As an employee, a manager, and a founder, these opportunities are also the building blocks of high performance.

18
This contraption turns Coca-Cola into pure drinking water - CNET

"When I looked at Coca-Cola that way, I saw dirty brown water, so it was logical to filter it back into clean drinking water, just as we do with all our waste water." Smits also said that he found it "absurd" when his research revealed that one liter of Coke (about a quart) can take nine liters of clean water (about 2.5 gallons) to produce.

19
The Random Events That Sparked 8 Of The World's Biggest Startups

A few years after graduating in 2006, Systrom and partner Mike Krieger were working on developing a photo-sharing app. While on a vacation, Systrom’s girlfriend, Nicole Schuetz , remarked that she would be reluctant to use the app because her pictures weren’t as good as a mutual friend’s. Schuetz thought it was due to the friend’s eye for photography, but Systrom knew it was his use of filters, prompting him to remember his experience in Florence. That day, he designed the first Instagram filter—called X-Pro II—that let users turn ordinary photos into hip, artistic images. Instagram was launched in October 2010; a month later it had one million users.

20
After leaking company data, Slack raises $120M from Google & Kleiner Perkins at $1.12B valuation

The new round values the company at $1.12 billion, post funding — a massive valuation for an eight-month-old company. Slack was quick to point this out in its press release: “Having just launched in February, this milestone marks Slack as the fastest growing SaaS company ever.”

21
The TheTechNewsBlog Daily

The TheTechNewsBlog Daily, by TheTechNewsBlog: updated automatically with a curated selection of articles, blog posts, videos and photos.

22
Adobe Launches Brackets V1.0, An Open-source Text Editor for Web Designers

Available for Windows, Mac and Linux, Brackets is aimed at Web designers and developers, with focused features like Live Preview to easily jump between browser view and source code for quick edits, inline editors to work on specific bits of code without pop-ups or additional tabs, and preprocessor support baked in. Users can also download and use extensions to add functionality to aid their workflow, such as Git integration and JSHint support.

23
Before the Berlin Wall, people escaped through a wire fence

On Saturday Aug. 12, 1961, a record number of people (approximately 4,000) fled from East to West Berlin. The following day, the world awoke to find 30 miles of barbed wire running through the heart of the city. The barrier was laid by East German soldiers.

24
How Much Would You Pay For An “Undo” Button On Tinder?

Tinder is moving forward with a testing plan for Tinder Plus, a new paid version of the app that brings premium features to users and finally starts a revenue stream for the growing IAC-owned dating company.

25
The Geniuses Behind All Those San Francisco Startups? They're Not Who You Think They Are

The typical image we have of startup workers—the ones who work 20-hour days , live in cramped “ tech communes ” and bootstrap on ramen as they vie for a coveted spot in an incubator and, they hope, a shot at that sweet-sweet venture capital—is only one version of this story. For some entrepreneurs, startups are sidelines that they work on as they hold down more traditional day jobs. For these founders, the hard work and hustle are added on top of the challenges of their full-time jobs, inspiring them to develop new strategies and workarounds as they balance their lives and their dreams.

26
Berlin, the Startup City: Big Dreams and Growing Pains

“Although Berlin was a really great place to get started — like many startups — we've faced
 some challenges growing the business beyond a certain stage,” Hossell said. “In recent months, we've been working to transition some operations to the U.S., in conjunction with a brand new version of Pipe, away from Facebook. In hindsight, I’d have made that move to the U.S. earlier or started the company there.”

27
Microsoft Band Preview - CNET

Everyone in the world has a wearable these days, and now it's Microsoft's turn. The Microsoft Band is now available after a surprise debut last night. Available only in the US for now, it costs $199, and works on Android, iPhones, and Windows Phone devices alike. It's a fitness band. But it also has smart features. It tracks heart rate, too. Availability for the UK or Australia has not yet been announced, but the price would directly convert to about £125 or AU$225.

28
The Best Baby Picture Ever of a Planetary System | WIRED

Astronomers have taken the best picture yet of a planetary system being born. The image, taken by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the high-altitude desert in Chile, reveals a planet-forming disk of gas around a young, sun-like star, in great detail.

29
Showtime To Launch Streaming Service

Many of the details of Showtime's service, like how much it will cost and whether it will include all programming that's available to Showtime's TV subscribers, are unclear. A Showtime spokesperson would not comment beyond a statement that said the company is "always looking at ways of expanding our audience and it is certainly something that we have been examining for some time. The subscription model is ideally positioned to take advantage of developing technologies in the consumer marketplace.”

30
Posture perfect: How to text and work at a desk without destroying your body

As can be seen from the video, Starrett’s gives a few simple tips. To get into a proper posture, extend your arms out to your sides and rotate your palms upward. This naturally pulls the shoulders back and gets the spine into a healthy neutral position. From there, the elbows can be bent inward to to hold a smartphone or type at a keyboard.

31
Inbox, Paper, And Sway: Why Tech Giants Are Suddenly Reinventing Their Core Apps

With Paper , Facebook has effectively rebooted its core News Feed product on the iPhone. Although Paper is built largely around the same photos and status updates you get from Facebook's main app, it doesn't feel like something that was merely retrofitted to the phone. It emphasizes large photos and swipe gestures, and lets you add general news sections for when you need a break from your friends. It could easily stand in for the main Facebook experience, even if it doesn't have all the same features.

32
Here's The Crazy Physics You Need To Know To Understand 'Interstellar'

For you, a minute near a black hole will still last 60 seconds, but if you could look at a clock on Earth, a minute will appear to last less than 60 seconds. This means you will age more slowly than the people on Earth. And the stronger the gravitational field you're in, the more extreme the time dilation.

33
Life as a Fake Beauty Queen in Small-Town China

Less reputable agencies in China provide models with few details about the jobs they'll be doing, calling gigs “fashion shows” and sending them on their way. Of the nine “fashion shows” I booked while in Beijing, only two were on a runway. The rest were fake pageants, car shows, and trade shows—but I was not informed of their nature until I was en route to the events. Models flagged as having low earning potential will do fake pageants frequently, as they’re easy to book. I once met a Russian teenager who was stuck traveling on a bus for 10 days across rural China as “Miss Argentina.”

34
Now Google Wants Your Genome, Too | MIT Technology Review

This flow of data is smaller than what is routinely handled by large Internet companies (over two months, Broad will produce the equivalent of what gets uploaded to YouTube in one day) but it exceeds anything biologists have dealt with. That’s now prompting a wide effort to store and access data at central locations, often commercial ones. The National Cancer Institute said last month that it would pay $19 million to move copies of the 2.6 petabyte Cancer Genome Atlas into the cloud. Copies of the data, from several thousand cancer patients, will reside both at Google Genomics and in Amazon’s data centers.

35
Alcohol Scientists Exist And They Have An App

I grabbed a few cold ones with COO Trace Smith while in Laguna Beach this last week to see how the app worked. To be honest, it’s a bit of an arduous process to first set up your taste profile. The app makes you swipe through a number of different bottles of wine and beer. It chooses those bottles for you. That’s not really helpful if you’ve never tasted any of them before. I had not tried most of the ones it forced me to rate before being able to use the app. Next Glass also didn’t have several of the bottles I had tried before in the search portion. I’m not entirely sure the recommendations I currently get are accurate because of this.

36
The Power of Routine for Boosting Creativity

When you write it down, decide to stick to it, no matter what, for a week. Every day, at that time, start working. Don’t even worry about how long you work for to start with, just get yourself into the habit of starting work at the same time every day. When you’ve found a time that works for you, stick to it for two weeks, and then a month.

37
Microsoft had to blindfold me so I could hear the future

Microsoft blindfolded me and led me around several streets before leaving me on the ledge of a freezing cold canal in London yesterday. Not in the interest of torturing me, or product secrecy; it was simply the best way to transport me to a reality that 39 million people face daily: blindness. For millions of blind and visually-impaired people, venturing out of the house can be a dangerous and daunting task. Microsoft is aiming to change this with 3D Audio technology and a smart headset the software giant is trialling in the UK.

38
The best sports fail GIFs of 2014

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 40 million unique visitors worldwide and 19 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

39
Wearables Are Totally Failing the People Who Need Them Most | WIRED

It’s a shame because the people who could most benefit from this technology—the old, the chronically ill, the poor—are being ignored. Indeed, companies seem more interested in helping the affluent and tech-savvy sculpt their abs and run 5Ks than navigating the labyrinthine world of the FDA, HIPAA, and the other alphabet soup bureaucracies. This may be their own undoing, as there is a very real—and potentially lucrative—potential to shake up the healthcare system and frack the $2 trillion annual cost of chronic disease.

40
Zuckerberg's one piece of advice for struggling entrepreneurs

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg answered questions yesterday during a live public Q&A about the future of the social network. The last question was asked by a shy 8th grader from a local school; she wanted to know how he forged through the hard times in the early Facebook days.

41
'Foodini' machine lets you print edible burgers, pizza, chocolate

The "Foodini," as it's called, isn't too different from a regular 3D printer, but instead of printing with plastics, it deploys edible ingredients squeezed out of stainless steel capsules: "It's the same technology," says Lynette Kucsma, co-founder of Natural Machines, "but with plastics there's just one melting point, whereas with food it's different temperatures, consistencies and textures. Also, gravity works a little bit against us, as food doesn't hold the shape as well as plastic."

42
The Guys Behind Your Favorite Parody Accounts Are Making Thousands Of...rs

He told BuzzFeed News that he’s part of an unofficial network of Twitter users, all with massive parody accounts who are regularly responsible for making new memes go super viral. He said the network — which has no corporate sponsor backing it — was responsible for the “Alex From Target” sensation on Sunday.

43
Apple Finally Has a Tool to Escape From iMessage Purgatory

If you've ever switched from an iPhone to absolutely any other phone at all , you know that getting your texts out of the infuriating black hole of dead iMessage numbers can be hell. At long last, Apple's heard our prayers (and hours upon hours of customer service calls) and released an online tool that makes the whole process as simple as it should have been all along.

44
This is Qualcomm’s world and we’re all just living in it

It’s impossible to find a smartphone manufacturer that doesn’t speak of Qualcomm in glowing terms. HTC calls its chip supplier an "extremely important partner," while LG echoes Motorola’s language in saying that it has "a great partnership with Qualcomm and both companies respect one another tremendously." LG goes on to add that "at one time there were other players in this space, but Qualcomm’s innovation is what put them at the top of the industry." The central innovation responsible for Qualcomm’s present dominance are those LTE modems that even Apple can’t get away from. The Snapdragon system-on-chip integrates the modem and applications processor into a single chip and is thus dramatically more efficient — both in terms of space and power requirements — than the competition and makes the processor choice for most phone makers a foregone conclusion. These days, it’s a matter of picking between the various strata of Snapdragon models rather than the various processor vendors.

45
Against Productivity

Here is what really happened in Puerto Rico four years ago: I fell into a funk, beat myself up a bit, and spent the rest of the time wandering around (mostly to the same places) and daydreaming. I wrote a few strange blog posts which no one read. I went a bit further into credit card debt. My days themselves were pretty quiet. I began to really think hard about what the internet does to society by just being the internet. I wrote out some of what I’d seen, and replayed them in my mind while I wandered around the beach. I made a video about being a robot in a Japanese blues bar asking if anyone could really see a singularity from inside of it. I tried to imagine 2010 me without the net. I tried to imagine 1989 me with the net. I talked about how the internet does and doesn’t change things in a place like PR. I read about Rwanda, and about the trade union history of PR and read and talked more about the history of coffee. Puerto Ricans are big on coffee. And then I left. I don’t remember where I went next.

46
If We Want Diverse Books, We Need Diverse MFA Programs

As black people, our writing draws from our lives and cultural experiences, things like the deaths of Trayvon Martin, Renisha McBride and Mike Brown; civil rights and slavery; revolutions and genocides in the various African countries we hail from—things often termed “too political” by the white establishment and ill-liked in workshop, and later passed over at book auction. Samantha Chang recalls being told by the director of her program at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop not to write Asian-American characters if she wanted to be a success. Diaz writes that his workshop at Cornell had “an almost lunatical belief that race was no longer a major social force,” and was never to be talked about “except on the rare occasion someone wanted to argue that ‘race discussions’ were exactly the discussion a serious writer should not be having.”

47
Inside What Your Brain Requires To Process New Information

Another takeaway from the study is the importance of allowing people to take time to consciously reflect on what they’ve learned. Taking a 10-minute study break or getting a cup of coffee is ideal—anything that lets them sit quietly and think. But don’t get distracted with tasks during the reflective period, Preston says. That means no fiddling with phones, bathroom breaks, or chatting with colleagues.

48
30-Player Grand Theft Auto Online Events Are Madness - IGN

Take the 30-player “Sandy Shores Race” out in Blaine County. It was Sanchez dirt bikes only, and the match host had it locked so that everyone had to race from the first-person perspective (the host can also force third-person view, or give players a choice). Through my helmet and goggles – any vehicle that necessitates a helmet includes its own custom first-person view, with the Buzzard helicopter’s being perhaps the coolest – I saw two dozen riders in front of me, all kicking up dust into my face as we sped away from the starting line. I was just getting a good feel for the high-speed racing from such an intense perspective (thanks for training me for this moment, Forza Motorsport series!), when WHAM! – I was rammed from behind by a Rockstar tester who’d decided to go for the win, sportsmanship be damned. This is GTA, after all…

49
Inflatable Incubator for Premature Babies Wins Dyson's $45K Prize | WIRED

In developing countries, childbirth is a high-risk affair—particularly if the baby’s born premature. In countries like the United States, we often put these babies in incubators until they’re able to make it on their own. But access to sophisticated equipment isn’t a given everywhere in the world. Incubators in particular are expensive, require constant electricity, and they can be complicated to operate and maintain. “I just thought, ‘there has to be a better way of doing this,’” says James Roberts.

50
Google Study Finds Email Scams Are More Effective Than You'd Expect

Google's advice for staying safe? Enable two-step verification on your email account, and report any suspicious emails instead of responding to them. And if you suspect your account has been compromised -- maybe because you've belatedly realized that something seemed off about the website you visited, or because a friend has asked you about the weird email they just got from your address -- you should work as quickly as possible to regain control . Twenty percent of hackers access compromised accounts within 30 minutes of getting their credentials , the study says.

51 7 Time Management Lessons From People Who Write A Novel In A Month
52 10 Christmas markets to get you into the holiday spirit
53 Astronaut's zero-g rendition of Bowie makes triumphant return - CNET
54 'Big Hero 6' review: a puffy, lovable robot to the rescue
55 Your Creative Calendar: 61 Things To Do, Watch, Hear, And Read This November
56 Even as We Navigate the Digital Era, Paper Maps Refuse to Fold
57 How the NFL tracks everything on the field but the ball
58 10 Productivity Tips For The Overwhelmed Entrepreneur
59 Five Technology Tools To Boost Your Networking
60 Computer Scientists Ask Supreme Court to Rule APIs Can’t Be Copyrighted
61 Looking for a new job? Check out these 10 openings in tech and digital
62 10 Things That Make an Addictive Mobile App
63 How LinkedIn's Reid Hoffman taught Stanford students to build billion-dollar businesses through personal networks (in 4 quotes)
64 These Apps Help You Realize How Much Time You Waste On Your Phone
65 The men who built the Berlin Wall
66 3D-printed T. rex roars water onto your body - CNET
67 Welcome to CNET Magazine - CNET
68 The Smile Revolution in Eighteenth Century Paris – review
69 Review: Austria’s Angelbird laptop SSD
70 Co.Design | business + design
71 5 Comics You Should Be Reading Right Now | WIRED
72 bmatzelle/gow
73 The Girl Scout troop teaching girls to be CEOs
74 Berlin’s digital exiles: where tech activists go to escape the NSA
75 Not the upgrade we were hoping for: The 2014 Mac Mini reviewed
76 Reactive MVC and the Virtual DOM — Futurice
77 5 tips for building a small business website on Squarespace
78 Lenovo pulls its best Apple impersonation with the S90 smartphone, including marketing materials
79 Chiaro Reboots The Pelvic Floor Exerciser As A Sleek Connected Wearable Called Elvie
80 11 Architectural Fantasies That Will Make Your Brain Hurt
81 How Friends Influence Us on Social Media
82 The Rise And Fall Of The Full Stack Developer
83 Google Nexus Player review
84 Yes, the 5K Retina iMac’s screen runs at 60Hz at 5K resolution
85 New to Netflix for November 2014 - IGN
86 Mark Zuckerberg explains why Facebook forced users to download the standalone Messenger app
87 Lenders can now disable your car when you’re driving on the freeway
88 How to Win Over 30 Consulting Offers in 30 Days
89 15 passive aggressive holiday gifts to confuse your friends
90 Little’s Law Is Big For Startups
91 Berlin’s digital exiles: where tech activists go to escape the NSA
92 Startup Semprius Fights to Bring Breakthrough Solar Tech to Market | MIT Technology Review
93 'Hour of Code' Sets Indiegogo Crowdfunding Record
94 This One Minute Video May Help You Save Someone's Life
95 Samsung Galaxy A5 Preview - CNET
96 Company Reputation Management With Social Media
97 Almost Everything in “Dr. Strangelove” Was True - The New Yorker
98 Using Big Data To Fight Pandemics
99 Future-proof Your Brand With The Right Typeface