Top Videos
Emoji Keyboards put ghosts and smiling poop at your fingertips

As humanity evolves, we find more efficient ways to communicate. Grunting led to talking, which led to writing, which led to letters. We put those letters down with giant feather quills, then with...

The heartfelt moment when sailors rescued a puppy lost at sea

Sailors with RYCC Savoia, a yacht club based in Naples, Italy, rescued the shaken labrador puppy when it was found swimming alone in the Gulf of Naples.

Firefox now blocks ads and trackers in Private Browsing mode

The latest version of Firefox will come with a powerful ad-blocking feature, Mozilla announced today. Under the browser's new setup, Private Browsing mode will block any script that could be used...

Larry David returns as Bernie Sanders on 'SNL'

Larry David makes a triumphant return as the Vermont Senator.

Donald Trump busts out 'Hotline Bling' dance moves on 'SNL'

Donald Trump has a pretty solid Drizzy inspired knee-bend and finger point move.

Dongle 'fixes' your PC's security by killing your USB port

USB Killer is convinced you'll fork over money to wreck your computer.

No one needs a tape gun for making 3D prototypes, but I want this one

Look, interior design is important and takes a lot of thought. That's why a team at the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design created what they call the "Protopiper," a handy prototyping device that...

A flying (Navy) SEAL set a world record flying 18 miles in a wingsuit

Andy Stumpf was willing to jump from a plane at 36,000 feet to raise awareness for a charitable cause. What have you done today?

Man in cat mask pranks his feline friends

A man with 5 cats pulls a prank on his pets with a creepy mask.

Celebrate 15 years of the ISS with NASA’s official country song

The International Space Station turns 15 years old today, and NASA is celebrating this fun anniversary in musical form. The space agency released a delightful video this morning about the orbiting...

The most dominant F1 car in history is coming to Forza 6

There's a new Forza 6 car pack being released this week, but there's only one car included that truly matters. Starting tomorrow, Forza 6 owners will be able to virtually pilot one of the crown...

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Top News
1
Volkswagen's US sales go up in October, despite diesel emissions scandal

Perhaps as the scandal deepens, as we learn more about how and why this happened, buyers will start to pick up on it and divert their cash to Volkswagen's competitors. Or perhaps — and this is the coldly cynical view — many Americans simply don't care that they've been lied to about the environmental friendliness of a vehicle. There's circumstantial evidence to back this up: studies show, for instance, that  SUV sales pick up when gas prices fall despite miserable fuel economy. For prospective VW buyers, it's hard to pass up a $5,000 discount on a new car.

2
TAG Heuer's $1,500 Android Wear watch is coming today

Interestingly, TAG Heuer is attacking the prospect of a watch becoming obsolete after a couple of years, and embracing its ethos of “eternity in a box.” After a couple of years, if you’ve no intention of upgrading the Carrera Connected to a new model, you can pop into a TAG Heuer dealer and get it swapped for a mechanical Carrera watch. That way, it’ll last forever, says Biver. You’ll need to spend another $1,500 to make it happen though.

3
The Politics of Silicon Valley

There are a lot of critiques of Silicon Valley’s politics. Nearly all of them claim, in some form or another, that the tech elite are apolitical technocrats who just want the government to get out of their hair while they build products that solve problems much better than bureaucrats ever could. Indeed, many startup founders seem like libertarians — at least when it comes to free trade and labor unions.

4
Stunned Archaeologists Find 22 Ancient Greek Shipwrecks

The archaeologists have only begun to analyze the material they collected from the shipwrecks in September, but the abundance of late Roman ships is already striking. They suspect that this apparent spike in traffic may be linked to the rise of Constantinople and the Eastern Roman Empire in the fourth century. They expect their ongoing research to answer many specific questions about ancient maritime trade networks and how they related to the shifting political structures of the Eastern Mediterranean.

5
MIT created a solar-powered machine that turns saltwater into drinking water

The group came up with a method that uses solar panels to charge a bank of batteries. The batteries then power a system that removes salt from the water through electrodialysis. On the most basic level, that means that dissolved salt particles, which have a slight electric charge, are drawn out of the water when a small electrical current is applied. In addition to getting rid of salt (which makes water unusable for crops and for drinking), the team also applied UV light to disinfect some of the water as it passed through the system.

6
Gwyneth Paltrow Goes To Market

Of all the activities on Paltrow’s professional pie chart these days— acting, investing, writing cookbooks, expanding her chain of high-end gyms with Tracy Anderson—Goop "is the biggest slice," she tells me over the phone a month later, as she drives her car across Los Angeles. She started the company in 2008 at her kitchen table in her house in London, having reduced her acting schedule to about one film per year in order to spend more time with her children. For years she had been compiling notes on how to live an elevated life. At the same time, she found herself asking questions about food, fashion, health, and spirituality, and not finding a place on the web that answered them. So she decided to start one, sharing tips makeup artists gave her before magazine shoots, restaurants she loved, unique spa treatments in far-flung locations, even advice from her therapists. Paltrow would test newsletter recipes in her kitchen and call to her editor, Eliza Honey—who was working upstairs—when they were ready to taste. "Like many other things in my life," Paltrow says, "I sort of found myself in the middle of doing them before I really understood how I got there.

7
17 Ways Amandla Stenberg Flawlessly Exemplified Black Girl Magic

Today the EP that my best friend and I made is out on iTunes. I've been fortunate enough to play violin and sing in Honeywater for a couple years now. I've loved every second of it - it has given me the opportunity to grow and develop as a musician, to push myself and be adventurous. I hope you'll enjoy Honeywater. Link in bio

8
1922: The discovery of Tutankhamun's tomb — in color

Carter searched the valley for years with little to show for it, which drew the ire of his employer. In 1922, Lord Carnarvon told Carter that he had only one more season of digging before his funding would be ended.

9
14,000 Images of the French Revolution Released Online

He later added, “Nor has any modern private entity evidenced the hubris of Skico in trying to make an example of Plaintiff, a bible-studying Eagle Scout who actively manages charitable missions to dig water wells in Africa, by publicly threatening criminal prosecution should he inadvertently cross unmarked lines running throughout Aspen and thousands of acres of surrounding forest land, the location of which are known only to Skico, as retaliation for Plaintiff’s turning to State and Federal agencies to force Defendant to comply with federal and state labor laws, and/or promoting unionization of Skico employees.”

10
Photoshop magic helped a dog swim with dolphins and visit Hoth

He swims with dolphins, explores Planet Hoth and convincingly blends into a very expensive wedding gown — in short, this might be the best day of this dog's life.

11
A Chip That Mimics Human Organs Is the Design of the Year

Called Organs-On-Chips , it’s exactly what it sounds like: A microchip embedded with hollow microfluidic tubes that are lined with human cells, through which air, nutrients, blood and infection-causing bacteria could be pumped. These chips get manufactured the same way companies like Intel make the brains of a computer. But instead of moving electrons through silicon, these chips push minute quantities of chemicals past cells from lungs, intestines, livers, kidneys and hearts. Networks of almost unimaginably tiny tubes give the technology its name—microfluidics—and let the chips mimic the structure and function of complete organs, making them an excellent testbed for pharmaceuticals. The ultimate goal is to lessen dependence on animal test subjects and decrease time and cost for developing drugs. Last year, researchers from  Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering started a  company called Emulate , which is now working with companies like Johnson & Johnson on just this idea: pre-clinical trial testing. The company is currently working on incorporating Emulate’s chips into its research and development programs.

12
Atheism 2.0

What aspects of religion should atheists (respectfully) adopt? Alain de Botton suggests a "religion for atheists" — call it Atheism 2.0 — that incorporates religious forms and traditions to satisfy our human need for connection, ritual and transcendence.

13
57 Ways to Spread Kindness and Brighten a Day

[…] Please don’t take this post as “preachy” – I am just as bad as the next person. Our lives are all so incredibly busy and the urge to navel-gaze is natural. But being a parent forces you to examine your behavior and try to be the best role model you can possibly be – even in the midst of the mayhem of daily life. So choose generosity. If you are looking for further simple ideas about how to spread some kindness, check out this lovely list of 57 ways you can brighten someone’s day. […]

14
The Illusion of Taste

He noted that other researchers have shown that the elderly, when eating tomato soup, must add more than twice as much salt as a young person does in order to achieve the same taste. Why not mitigate that increased salt consumption, and its attendant health hazards, by presenting the soup in a blue container, a color that Spence has shown can make food seem significantly saltier? Similarly, experts estimate that sixty per cent of eighty-year-olds have an impaired sense of smell, sharply reducing their enjoyment—and thus, often, their intake—of food. In a live demonstration conducted in 2006 with the celebrity chef Heston Blumenthal, Spence found that when people were served a scoop of bacon-and-egg ice cream accompanied by the sound of sizzling bacon they described the taste of the ice cream as much more “bacony” than subjects whose consumption was accompanied by the clucking of chickens. This insight—that the appropriate soundtrack can intensify the flavor of a food—inspired Blumenthal’s iconic “Sound of the Sea” dish, for which diners at his restaurant, the Fat Duck, in Bray, are presented with an iPod loaded with a recording of crashing waves and screeching gulls to listen to while enjoying an artfully presented plate of seafood.

15
Photographer's spot-on rant begs for phone-free weddings

1. Guests with phones, iPads and cameras get right in your photographer's way. They have no idea how to stay out of our way. They often ruin many of our shots. They will make our photos worse. You're paying a photographer quite a bit of money; that means you want great photos. We cannot do our best work with people getting in our way.

16
Why we should stop worrying about our wandering minds

The discovery of the resting state also has the potential to change the way we each feel about our brains. We know how hard it is to empty our minds. We know how our minds have a frustrating tendency to wander even when we don’t want them to. But the emerging picture suggests these quirks might actually be beneficial – even if they do prevent us from finishing a task in time to meet a deadline. In other words, perhaps it’s time to celebrate the virtues of an idle mind. 

17
The most expensive food on earth is found in a sea of purple flowers

For one week each year, gorgeous purple flowers bloom in only a few places around the world. People wade into the purple seas to harvest the blooms by hand and then pick their stamens to sell as saffron.

18
Even the military may not be enough to protect an endangered Amazon tribe

Two employees of the government’s agency for indigenous affairs were recently manning the gates of the Awá’s reserve. One, Claudmiro Silva, wore a pistol in the waistband of his shorts. Both men said they felt vulnerable in this dirt-poor area, where gunmen can be hired for $100 or less and local landowners and loggers have been known to resort to violence. “We hope for an improvement here, for our security,” said João Sampaio, Silva’s colleague.

19
WordPress now powers 25% of the Web

Websites, not individual web pages, are examined — if a technology is on any of a website’s pages, it is considered to be used by the website. Furthermore, W3Techs doesn’t technically scan the whole World Wide Web. To limit the impact of domain spammers, only the top 10 million websites are investigated, based on the popularity rankings provided by Alexa, using a three-month average ranking.

20
Home | Newsletters | MIT Technology Review

I would like to receive information about other MIT Technology Review initiatives.

21
Why People Keep Trying to Erase the Hollywood Sign From Google Maps

The Hollywood Sign might be one of the most recognizable things on Earth. In Los Angeles, it’s also one of the most visible. You can see it from a plane as you glide into LAX. You can see it from a car as you drive up the 101 freeway. But a group of people who live near the sign are trying to hide it, even as it looms in the hills, in plain sight. By removing it from Google Maps.

22
How to Run an Instagram Influencer Campaign

I guess you could say that I am an influencer (although I don’t quite have the numbers mentioned here, I have around 43,000 followers right now). I offer paid mentions (for a specific type of business niche) as you referenced at the end. And while some people might be open to price negotiations, I am definitely not. To me it seems like an insult. I don’t ask for a discount from my web designer, hosting company, or my doctor for the same reason. My price is my price, and if you don’t like it, you can find someone else to feature your business. I also don’t feature just anyone. They have to apply and be approved as a good fit for my feed.

23
Puppies! Now that I’ve got your attention, complexity theory

Animal behavior isn't complicated, but it is complex. Nicolas Perony studies how individual animals — be they Scottish Terriers, bats or meerkats — follow simple rules that, collectively, create larger patterns of behavior. And how this complexity born of simplicity can help them adapt to new circumstances, as they arise.

24
Here Is Why Elon Musk Is The World's Raddest Man

Reading about Musk online and in Vance's book, I was struck by how representative both of these Quora comments were of whole camps of opinion on working for Musk. Doing so seems to bring out a tremendous amount of adoration and a tremendous amount of exasperation, sometimes with a tone of bitterness--and even more oddly, much of the time, you hear both sides of this story expressed by the same person. For example, later in the comment of the effusive Quora commenter comes "Working with him isn't a comfortable experience, he is never satisfied with himself so he is never really satisfied with anyone around him...the challenge is that he is a machine and the rest of us aren't." And the frustrated anonymous commenter later concedes that the way Elon is "is understandable" given the enormity of the task at hand, and that "it is a great company and I do love it."

25
Stop Selling. Start Sharing. What Social Media's All About

Kitchen knives come in a variety of blade styles; each blade is designed to perform different tasks. So, talk about them. Talk about knife blades, handles, edges, blade materials that work best for various jobs. Talk about the importance of keeping a knife sharp. Talk about the history of knives. Develop interesting associations with other subjects through your knives. The list is virtually endless and there are endless ways to talk about it all. Think creatively. But keep in mind that social media is a forum for conversation, for imparting information that will teach people something or help them in some way. Give people something to think about. Get them talking. Give them a reason to come back to your site regularly. You’re on social media to make people happy and your ongoing (consistent) presence on social media should be designed to  keep  them happy.

26
Leaked Comcast memo reportedly admits data caps aren't about improving network performance

There are also a few other interesting details in the leaked documents, including the company's policy for dealing with customers who use certain buzzwords that Comcast doesn't like. If a customer utters the words "net neutrality," or dares to ask about what is and isn't counted under the data cap, they'll get transfered to a different customer service team. Calls will also be escalated if customers make "observations about how Xfinity services are or are not counted relative to third party services." Representatives are instructed "not address these items with the customer" according to the documentation. Historically, Comcast's own internet streaming services, like its Xfinity app for Xbox, have not counted against caps , while competing services like Netflix do.

27
There might be a Hunger Games theme park coming to Atlanta

If you're struggling to understand the appeal of a theme park angled around 1) a yearly competition in which children fight and kill each other until only one's left standing and 2) the subsequent violent, confusing revolution, you're not alone. Lionsgate was apparently rebuffed by a few major theme park operators when it first proposed acquiring the Hunger Games license, and American partner Avatron felt compelled to defend the property's suitability in The New York Times piece linked above. "There are so many positives about these movies, starting with the fact that she's an empowered young woman," said Avatron vice chairman James Ram.

28
Technology Device Ownership: 2015

For example, e-reader device ownership has fallen. Today, about one-in-five adults (19%) report owning an e-reader, while in early 2014 that share was a third (32%). Ownership of MP3 players has not had a notable decline, but the percentage of adults who own one has hovered around the 40% mark since 2008. And computer ownership levels have stayed roughly where they were a decade ago. These changes are all taking place in a world where smartphones are transforming into all-purpose devices that can take the place of specialized technology, such as music players, e-book readers and gaming devices. Some of the changes in device ownership patterns are particularly evident for young adults. Among those ages 18-29, ownership of MP3 players and computers has declined by double digits in the past five years. In 2010, three-quarters of 18- to 29-year-olds owned an MP3 player; by 2015, only half (51%) had one.

29
The most ambitious space game in history has raised $94 million. So where is it?

Because of this delay and those conspicuously large price tags, Star Citizen and its developer, Cloud Imperium Games, have drawn intense scrutiny and become a lightning rod for a host of issues: the ethics of crowdfunding, the limits of in-game purchases, and the trustworthiness of the video game hype machine.

30
Netflix may start producing Bollywood and anime programming

We're hopeful that we'll over time make a great Bollywood show, make a great anime show. It might not be that that Bollywood show is for [Showtime CEO] Matt Blank. It might be that it's more segmented, but again the internet let's you do that. I think that's the key in that enablement. But as Matt knows, making these shows is very challenging and I'm sure we'll have issues over time.

31
9 ways to trick yourself into writing a novel

Go old school and write your novel in a handy notebook. Writing off your computer can decrease the number of online distractions. (It's easy to open up Facebook or get sucked into Reddit.) Writing in a notebook requires you to focus on the task at hand, and the lack of an online Thesaurus requires deep thought for the perfect description. The mobility also guarantees writing access nearly anywhere, Wi-Fi be damned.

32
Apple’s survey app helps venues easily create indoor maps

Apple has quietly launched a dedicated indoor positioning app on iOS, letting business owners map out their venues using just their iPhones. The Indoor Survey App was first  spotted on the App Store by developer Steve Troughton-Smith, and although it doesn't appear in search, it's easily accessible via  a direct link .

33
Medical Research: The Dangers to the Human Subjects by Marcia Angell

Given the American faith in medical advances (the NIH is largely exempt from the current disillusionment with government), it is easy to forget that clinical trials can be risky business. They raise formidable ethical problems since researchers are responsible both for protecting human subjects and for advancing the interests of science. It would be good if those dual responsibilities coincided, but often they don’t. On the contrary, there is an inherent tension between the search for scientific answers and concern for the rights and welfare of human subjects.

34
Is the Many Worlds hypothesis just a fantasy? – Philip Ball – Aeon

MWI does NOT follow from the mathematics. Nothing about reality follows from mathematics because mathematics is just a conceptual construct which we (observers) use to build mental models to help us make predictions about future observations. If these predictions are proven to be accurate the model survives and the process continues but the model is still just a model. Since standard (un-interpreted) QM makes the same predictions as all of its interpretations, each of the latter, including MWI, is just speculative metaphysics as far as real science is concerned. While some interpretations are at least internally consistent (although very likely still wrong), the problem with MWI is that, as the author has pointed out, it appears to be self-undermining. For example, is there another copy of you in another universe claiming the exact opposite of what you are claiming here? If not, why not? If so, what the hell makes you so sure that you are right and he is wrong, since you were both forced to your views deterministically by the quantum evolution of your own worlds? The status of truth is a problem with any metaphysical worldview that denies the reality of freewill but the issue is particularly obvious in multiverse theories due to the explicit concept that all possible worlds are realised and so, therefore, are all possible opinions a person might ever hold.

35
Google's new email feature will write replies for you

Behind the scenes, the feature took quite a bit of engineering to get it working, Miklós, explains. It uses machine learning techniques to surface relevant responses in realtime. As with other tools that use natural language technology, Smart Replies should improve over time as people use the feature more. He notes that when they first began testing it, a commonly suggested reply was "I love you," which is probably not appropriate for most work-related correspondence. (He promises that reply suggestions have been tweaked to be more SFW.)

36
Can Fast-Food Work Ever Be A Decent Job? These Swedish McDonald's Workers Say Yes

"Life is pretty hard right now," says KeJioun Johnson, a 20-year-old, part-time McDonald's cashier who lives with his single mom (a part-time bus driver) in government-subsidized housing in Chicago. Six months ago he was hired at the fast-food chain, at a location 90 minutes away from his house on the city’s public rail line. He started working 25 to 28 hours per week at $8.25 per hour. After federal and state withholdings, he was taking home about $200 per week. On July 1, the minimum wage in Chicago was officially raised to $10 per hour. Johnson thought his finances, at the very least, might begin to show small signs of improvement. He might be able to start making plans to attend community college. He could try to figure out how to escape the projects, in a neighborhood which, he says, "I would not want to raise my kid in if I had kids." Instead, his boss drastically cut his hours to eight per week: with a take-home pay of only $72.50 per week.

37
Woman gives birth one hour after learning she's pregnant

Judy Brown, 47, went to Beverly Hospital in Beverly, Massachusetts this Wednesday, complaining of severe abdominal pain. She thought she had a gallstone. Upon examination, doctors revealed to Brown that her gallstone was, in fact, a baby. Just one hour later, Brown gave birth to a healthy baby girl.

38
How big is Snapchat?

<a href="https://photoworld.com/how-big-is-snapchat/" target="_blank"><img src="https://photoworld.com/how-big-is-snapchat/social/embed.png" border="0" width="550" height="550" /></a><br /><span style="font-size: 12px;">Click image to open interactive version (via <a href="https://photoworld.com/">photoworld</a>).</span>

39
11 authors' strategies for overcoming writer's block

"I feel writers sometimes put too much pressure on themselves and they feel like they have to do it by a certain time, but it’s not like a test in school where you have to finish it within the hour, or even within the week. You can take as much time as you need. I think if it’s difficult to write, if you’re forcing it, then the reader will see that, and when it works the best, it’s not being forced."

40
StarCraft: The past, present and future

Waugh, who came on as a senior story developer in 2008, never aspired to be a video game writer. He came from the film industry, where he worked for about a decade as a development executive and screenwriter. His relationship to StarCraft, however, can be traced back to his senior year of college, when he picked up a copy of the first game. Waugh went home to play his new game — and then spent the next hour engrossed in the game’s manual, which featured pages upon pages of lore penned by Metzen.

41
A cartoonist turned the iTunes Terms of Service into a 47-page graphic novel

It is a time-honored truth (or at least an oft-cited anecdote) that no one reads the iTunes Terms and Conditions. It's long and presumably boring (but who knows? I've never read it) and I'm not even sure there are paragraph breaks. There already exist a few projects that try to reshape various  user agreements into digestible formats , but now one man has embarked on a mission to make reading the iTunes ToS a more literary endeavor.

42
Microsoft to discontinue Windows 7 and 8.1 next November - CNET

Windows 7 users may not realize it, but they actually caught a break. Microsoft typically sets the end-of-sales date for each version of Windows two years after the release of a new version. That means Windows 7's cutoff date should have been in October 2014, two years after the launch of Windows 8. The lack of consumer demand for Windows 8 prompted Microsoft to keep Windows 7 alive longer than expected.

43
The digital revolution in higher education has already happened. No one noticed.

The digital revolution in higher education has happened. In the fall of 2012, the most recent semester with complete data in the U.S., four million undergraduates took at least one course online , out of sixteen million total, with growth up since then. Those numbers mean that more students now take a class online than attend a college with varsity football. More than twice as many now take a class online as live on campus. There are more undergraduates enrolled in an online class than there are graduate students enrolled in all Masters and Ph.D. programs combined. At the current rate of growth, half the country’s undergraduates will have at least one online class on their transcripts by the end of the decade. This is the new normal.

44
Disney Is Finally Getting That Apps Are the Future of TV

As that change happens, the question becomes how third parties, from movie theaters to cable companies, will fare in the world where it might be Apple, Google, and Amazon who serve as the intermediaries for our apps on our phones and devices. As a great unbundling happens and so-called “skinny bundles” of fewer channels become more popular, services will get cut or left behind. And the distributors know this. Comcast and Verizon launched their own video streaming apps this year, a sign that they’re aware their control over what we watch is quickly slipping away.

45
550 sheep trick farmer with masterful disguise

The farmer shared a few images of her sheep in a snowy field on Wednesday, and if you glance at them quickly, you'd never guess that there are actually about 550 sheep grazing in the photos.

46
UK wants all residents to have access to broadband by 2020

It's not a far-fetched goal, since the UK already expects to have 95 percent broadband coverage by the end of 2017. However, there are questions as to whether or not the expansion will be enough. There's a difference between having the option of broadband and having the money to pay for it, for one thing. The Conservative-led administration says the options will be "affordable," but it's not clear just where pricing will start. Also, the Labour Party is concerned that this emphasis on access will put quality on the "back-burner." What good is signing up if your broadband isn't reliable?

47
A Gorgeous Tour of the Largest Ship in the World

At 194 feet wide and 1,312 feet long, the Matz Maersk Triple E is the largest ship ever built. It can carry 18,000 20-foot containers; its propellers weigh 70 tons apiece; it is too big for the Panama Canal, though it can shimmy through the Suez. All this is to say: This is a ship of daunting proportions.

48
More a marathon than a sprint

Africa’s final snag is its geography. East Asia’s string of successes happened under the “flying geese” model of development, where a “lead” country creates a slipstream for others to follow. This happened first in the 1970s, when Japan moved labour-intensive manufacturing to Taiwan and South Korea. But Africa seems to have missed the flock. “We don’t have a leading goose, a Japan,” says Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Nigeria’s former finance minister. Light manufacturing is leaving China for neighbouring Bangladesh and Vietnam rather than distant Africa, despite its promise of plentiful cheap labour. “Africa’s growth is not driven by export-led manufacturing,” says Dani Rodrik, an economist. “And in the coming century Africa will find it difficult to grow through that route.”

49
Volvo is testing kangaroo avoidance technology for Australian drivers

Stateside, as large mammals go, deer are probably the single biggest threat to cars traveling the highways. Now, imagine a smaller, "very unpredictable" deer that hops on two legs: that's the hell of driving in Australia, where some 20,000 kangaroo collisions are said to happen annually.

50
NFL star Greg Hardy tweets regret after abuse photos released

After he returned to the NFL this year following a suspension for beating a woman named Nicole Holder, his girlfriend at the time, Hardy said he couldn't wait to play the New England Patriots because he was stoked to see Tom Brady's wife, the model Gisele Bundchen . Before his first game of the year, he said he wanted to come out "guns blazing," without any visible recognition that maybe he should have chosen different words, given he was suspended in part for tossing Holder onto a futon stacked with assault rifles.

51 Reg Saddler on Twitter
52 Confessions of a Paywall Journalist
53 Reg Saddler on Twitter
54 The Muse - Career advice and better job search
55 How it feels to do naked yoga in front of strangers
56 Mobile App Developers are Suffering — Startups, Wanderlust, and Life Hacking
57 William Gibson — Hand & Brain
58 NASA wants you... to be its next flag football referee
59 A giant sheep statue in rural town turns into mythical creature
60 Ericsson + Cisco Ink Strategic Deal Projected To Bring Each $1B More In Sales By 2018
61 Relive your '90s Nickelodeon childhood by making your own Gak
62 hackaday on Twitter
63 Climate change could erase years of global anti-poverty efforts, study finds
64 How to survive the iPhone 6s app purge
65 Could Detroit become the next Silicon Valley?
66 BlackBerry's Android phone is coming to Verizon, too
67 For vast majority of seniors who own one, a smartphone equals ‘freedom’
68 How to growth hack your enterprise SaaS startup
69 15 terrifying animals you are SO glad are extinct (pictures) - CNET
70 Don't let your smartphone be lazy: Make it help cure cancer as you sleep
71 OmniRAT on the loose: Spyware's nibbling Android with a taste for Linux, Mac and Windows | ZDNet
72 10 details of the Potterverse JK Rowling still needs to address
73 Living and Dying on Airbnb — Matter
74 Who is Jia Yueting, the Chinese billionaire linked to Faraday?
75 Another $1 Million Crowdfunded Gadget Company Collapses
76 ​Marshmallow on just 0.3 percent of Android phones - but still rolls out faster than Lollipop | ZDNet
77 Five things to consider before switching to a standing desk - CNET
78 How To Grow Your Small Business After A Setback
79 For a real Australian Christmas, you'll need this ugly sweater rashie
80 Apple's cool 'Indoor Survey' app maps venues using radio frequencies, but you can't use it
81 GamerGate can't be solved by the government, says Australian senator
82 9 TED Talks on how games can improve your life
83 We Need a Better Way to Get to Space
84 Weight loss apps no better at helping shed pounds than pamphlets
85 Racial and ethnic differences in how people use mobile technology
86 Checking Email After Work Isn't the Worst Thing Ever
87 101 startup tools to make your idea a reality
88 America only just discovered the sausage roll and they're freaking out
89 Twitter Flight 2015 session videos (and slide decks) are now available online