Top Videos
No creature in the world is happier than this dancing dog

Watch this little guy shake his butt like a fun dancing mom as he waits for his owner to come retrieve him from his pen.

Man Creates The First Ever Leaf That Turns Light and Water Into Oxygen

If humanity hopes to realize its dreams of exploring the stars, we're going to need to find ways to recreate life on Earth aboard a spaceship. Simply stockpi...

Watch superheroes face off in fan-made 'DC vs. Marvel' trailer - CNET

Batman vs. Iron Man, Superman vs. Thor and The Hulk vs. everyone else? Check out this fan-made "DC vs. Marvel" trailer and imagine the mashup movie of your nerd dreams.

A modern-day 'Love Actually' would not be romantic at all

'Saturday Night Live' parodies 'Love Actually' in this cut-for-time sketch.

Mysterious Explosions and Flashes, Filmed but Still Unexplained | Mysterious Universe

Over the last few weeks, we have been hearing an awful lot about mysterious "bangs" that have been heard in various locales around the world. From the various recordings made of these noises, the sounds being reported often seem to bear the acoustic hallmarks of fireworks, military weapons and aircraft tests, and even thunder. While many of these curious noises have captured the public mind, strange sonic phenomena aren't the only things that tend to go "bang" like this. There are, albeit less often, mysterious flashes that are occasionally captured on film as well that, strangely, while very explosive in appearance, tend to come and go with little noise at all. Occasionally, phenomenon that include lights in the sky that range from meteors, to drones buzzing overhead, are recorded by individuals quick with their camera phones. This isn't always the case, however; in one particularly unusual example of mysterious light phenomenon being caught on film, in 2012 a reporter with FOX 10 in

No One Can Make A Viral Video by Joe Wilson

FULL FILM COURAGE INTERVIEW WITH JOE WILSON https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGeBmEOf8Zc Filmmaker / Web Series Creator Joe Wilson (VAMPIRE MOB) shares his th...

EHR Jobs - Start your mobile iPad EMR career - drchrono

drchrono is a rapidly growing company. Our expansion continues at a breakneck speed and we need great people like you! Our team has been the cornerstone of our success. A passion for the product unites and motivates us. You belong here if you feel it too. You can help enrich the experience of our users and push forward the product in fresh and innovative ways. You will be asked to harness your talents and accomplish things you've never done before. You will make an impact.

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Top News
1
Alibaba spent $161 million fighting fakes since 2013

BEIJING (Reuters) - China's Alibaba Group Holding Ltd, the world's largest e-commerce company, spent over 1 billion yuan ($160.7 million) combating fake goods and for improving customer protection from the beginning of 2013 to the end of November, the firm said Tuesday.

2
Comcast-TWC merger delayed, FCC says 7,000 docs wrongly held back

It is shocking to me that this merger is -still- being considered. The merger is no good for anyone except the executives and stockholders of Comcast. That’s not good enough for something this vital. There are no “conditions,” “concessions,” or “promises” that Comcast can make that would make this pig not stink. Too much power, too much monopoly control, too much ability to absolutely halt technology progress in America, too much content control, too much ability to raise prices and create artificial scarcity. Comcast has shown lousy public service habits, lousy quality of service, lousy concern for customers, lousy, lousy, lousy. I urge you to write, phone, telegram, complain to high heaven to every official you can think of. This thing cannot be allowed to happen.

3
North Korea Internet Outage Highlights Isolated Online World

After a nine-hour outage that shut off North Korea’s major propaganda websites from the outside world, service has been mostly restored, leaving questions about the possible involvement of the U.S., which promised last week to “respond proportionally” to a crippling cyberattack on Sony Pictures Entertainment.

4
North Korea's internet links restored: U.S. monitoring company

SINGAPORE (Reuters) - North Korea's internet links have been restored, but it is not clear how stable they are, the U.S.-based internet monitoring company Dyn said on Tuesday.

5
30 best iPad games - CNET

Trying to figure out which iPad games to buy with your hard-earned dough? Here's a look at our current top 30 favorites.

6 Interesting papers from NIPS 2014 | BadMagicNumber

Learning Word Representations with Hierarchical Sparse Coding : From the Ark group at CMU. An alternative to Word2Vec for understanding word semantics. Results seems roughly comparable to Word2Vec (which is good! Word2Vec is pretty much one of the miracles of the age.) There is a claim that training is significantly faster than previous methods: 2 hours to train vs 6.5 for Word2Vec on the same 6.8 billion word corpus. See the Paragraph Vectors paper as well.

7
North Korean internet service resumes after shutdown

The issue of who carried out a cyber-attack, if there was one, is complicated by the fact that knocking out North Korea’s web network would not be a particularly difficult task. It has a total of 1,024 IP addresses – in a country of 25 million people – a single service provider and one connection to the outside world, via China. “Any one of us that was upset because we couldn’t watch the movie, you could do that,” said Dan Holden, director of security research at Arbor Networks. “Their internet is just not that sophisticated.”

8
Study: Tablets might be messing with your sleep

But if you feel you need to maintain your digital lifestyle, you might spring for one of those e-ink readers, such as the original Kindle, as they’re not likely to emit the blue light that keeps you awake at night. Unfortunately, the study did not test light-emitting e-ink readers, such as the Kindle Paperwhite — those would be a great addition for a future study.

9
Robotic Spider Dress defends your personal space - CNET

It's my considered and educated opinion that Anouk Wipprecht 's updated Spider Dress is fabulous on sheer aesthetic value alone, but the spectacular grotesquerie isn't simply for its own sake. The dress has been integrated with a number of technologies leveraging Intel's Edison chip to keep people from entering your personal space.

10
The 9 Best Out-of-Office Emails to Get You Ready for Vacation

Of course, people who are still toiling away while you're soaking up rays are going to try to email you, under the impression that you're actually going to be responsive. Make sure they know they'll have to wait with the perfect out-of-office automatic response.

11
7 board games to bring to your family holiday party

How well you do at this game depends on just how well you know your family members. What? (which boldly bills itself as the "ultimate laugh out loud board game") makes players write responses to silly questions. Then, players have to guess who wrote what.

12
Elon Musk says Tesla is revealing a new Roadster this week

In a busy year for Elon Musk, in which he  designed rockets , unveiled  supercars , and got into  the satellite business , the billionaire inventor could almost be forgiven for overlooking a promise he made back in June, to reveal a new update to the Tesla Roadster before the end of 2014. But it now looks like Musk will make good on his plan — the Tesla CEO said in a tweet that he'd outline  the "fairly exciting update" to the car company's first electric car this week.

13
This office Slip 'n Slide makes for a wild work Christmas party

"It's awesome to work for a company that doesnt take itself too seriously," a Flight Centre worker, who declined to be identified, told Mashable . "Flight Centre staff work extremely hard but know how to let their hair down. We are well known for our love of a good party all over the world, and the annual Christmas Slip n Slide is just one example of this."

14
12 Holiday Gifts You'll Want To Keep For Yourself

The Amazon Kindle Paperwhite is our favorite of the bunch, primarily because it's affordable (at just over $100), is easy-to-use, and offers access to Amazon’s unparalleled book selection for the best prices. The Wi-Fi Only version with ads is great on its own, but if you want to impress your giftee even more, the Wi-Fi+3G version will allow them to download books from anywhere without having to worry about finding a wireless connection—from a cruise in the middle of the ocean to a camp site in the middle of Kansas, or anywhere in between.

15
An Orangutan Has (Some) Human Rights, Argentine Court Rules | WIRED

On Friday, an appeals court declared that Sandra , who is owned by the Buenos Aires Zoo, is a “non-human person” who has been wrongfully deprived of her freedom.

16
6 tech trends for 2015 that will change our future

“In 2015, we’ll see this have more of an impact on manufacturing,” said Professor Julie A. Shah, who leads the Interactive Robotics Group at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. She noted this growing confidence in robots on the factory floor will lead to them working in concert with humans. Right now, most factory robots work in highly-controlled environments, with humans a safe distance away.

17
How Headlines Change the Way We Think - The New Yorker

In a series of studies,  out this month  in the  Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied , Ecker had people in Australia read either factual or opinion pieces, where the only shifting variable was the headline. (He had his subjects read a total of four articles—two factual, two opinion.) One factual article, for instance, talked about a change in burglary rates over the last year—a rise of 0.2 per cent—that ran counter to a ten-per-cent decline over the past decade. The slight rise, the article pointed out, was an anomalous side note; the longer trend was what was important. The accompanying headline highlighted either the smaller or the larger of the two trends: “Number of burglaries going up” and “Downward trend in burglary rate,” respectively. The opinion pieces pitted the thoughts of an expert against those of a layperson—for instance, one piece contrasted a citizen’s concerns about the safety of genetically modified food with the opinion of a scientist from the fictional company Organic Food Science Australia. The headline focussed on one of the two sides. In this case, it read either “GM foods may pose long-term health risks” or “GM foods are safe.

18
A kinder, gentler philosophy of success

Alain de Botton examines our ideas of success and failure — and questions the assumptions underlying these two judgments. Is success always earned? Is failure? He makes an eloquent, witty case to move beyond snobbery to find true pleasure in our work.

19
Dog Can Walk Again Thanks To 3D Printing

While this footage, like the footage of 3D-printed ducks before it , is designed primarily to melt our poor widdle hearts, it’s wonderful to see a dog so happy and all thanks to rapid prototyping. While these sorts of things were possible for decades, the work required to sculpt legs like these was prohibitive, especially for an animal. Now, however, you could feasibly design these once and scale them up and down for various animals, inviting in the Age of the Bionic Hamster or the Era of the Cyber-Ermine. Or, simply, the Hour of Sweet, Lovable Derby.

20
Charges Expected To Be Filed Against MOA Protest Organizers

BLOOMINGTON (WCCO) — In the next few days, the Bloomington City Attorney Sandra Johnson expects to file criminal charges against the organizers of Saturday’s protest at Mall of America.

21
Here's why so many airports have rocking chairs

If I had to pick places I’d expect to see rocking chairs, front porches, living rooms, and pretty much anywhere else would rank far above cavernous and stark airport terminals, yet that’s probably where I’m most likely to see them. And while I could imagine an aggressively whimsical designer somewhere throwing a bunch of rocking chairs in a terminal, I had a hard time seeing how they’d sprung up in so many airports across the country. Why rocking chairs? Where did they come from?

22
A Mini Farm That Produces Food From Plastic-Eating Mushrooms | WIRED

The Austrian designer partnered with Julia Kaisinger and Utrecht University to develop a system that cultivates edible plastic-digesting fungi. That’s right, you can eat mushrooms that eat plastic. In 2012, researchers at Yale University discovered a variety of mushroom (Pestalotiopsis microspora) that is capable of breaking down polyurethane. It kicked off a craze of research exploring how various forms of fungi can degrade plastic without retaining the toxicity of the material. The findings got Unger thinking: What if we could turn an environmental problem (waste) into an environmental solution (food)?

23
E-readers 'damage sleep and health'

If you type the word Amazon into Google you will - and I guarantee this - see some article by the Guardian knocking Amazon, because the old ways of life are changing and the dear old newspapers and TV stations don't like this, just as the the stuffy publishing houses hate the ebook and the fact that anyone can be published nowadays. E-readers are just as safe as someone watching TV in bed.

24
Console Madness: Free Smash Bros 3DS XL, the rarest PS4 game, and much more

So Joystiq's given away a couple of limited edition Xbox Ones, a limited edition PlayStation 4, a crazy edition of Destiny , and a whole mess of random swag. You think we're done? We're not done. Prepare for more! In the lead-up to Christmas, Joystiq is giving away a limited edition Super Smash Bros. Nintendo 3DS XL. Snazzy art plus a copy of the game pre-installed! That's not all we're giving away, though. There's also a copy of Retro City Rampage for PlayStation 4. Recently released as a physical edition, it's the rarest PS4 game out there and already fetching serious prices on eBay. Finally, we've got an enormous box of mystery swag. What's in the box? You'll have to be one of our three winners to find out. Here's how to get the goods: Just use the Rafflecopter widget below between December 19 and December 26. Winners will be selected at random and contacted via email. Full rules and details after the break. Free Smash Bros 3DS XL, the rarest PS4 game, and much more giveaway [Images: Nintendo] Super Smash Bros. (3DS Single Player) AOL TECH GIVEAWAY - OFFICIAL RULES No purchase required to enter or win.

25
Jingle hell: Where your Christmas baubles and santa hats are made

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 40 million unique visitors worldwide and 20 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

26
In 2050, You Might Want To Be Living In Helsinki

The city's vision was all based on detailed feedback from current residents. "In a couple of months we were able to gather over 30,000 markings made by thousands of people," says Manninen. "The answers have been published as open data for anyone to use. This is one aspect in which we have been showing the way for many other cities that are dealing with questions concerning public participation."

27
No big deal, just a bunny dressed like Daenerys Targaryen and Walter White

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 40 million unique visitors worldwide and 20 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

28
Mathematicians Make a Major Discovery About Prime Numbers | WIRED

The two new proofs of Erdős’ conjecture are both based on a simple way to construct large prime gaps. A large prime gap is the same thing as a long list of non-prime, or “composite,” numbers between two prime numbers. Here’s one easy way to construct a list of, say, 100 composite numbers in a row: Start with the numbers 2, 3, 4, … , 101, and add to each of these the number 101 factorial (the product of the first 101 numbers, written 101!). The list then becomes 101! + 2, 101! + 3, 101! + 4, … , 101! + 101. Since 101! is divisible by all the numbers from 2 to 101, each of the numbers in the new list is composite: 101! + 2 is divisible by 2, 101! + 3 is divisible by 3, and so on. “All the proofs about large prime gaps use only slight variations on this high school construction,” said James Maynard of Oxford, who wrote the second of the two papers .

29
Datanyze Acquires LeadLedger, A Sales Tool That Tracks Tech Product Market Share

Datanyze is the sales prospecting tool powered by technology data. By crawling millions websites each day, we help businesses like Marketo, KISSmetrics and Fastly understand not only who is using their competitors’ software, but also when they started or stopped using it. Through the web app, chrome extension and a direct integration with Salesforce.com, Datanyze provides the most accurate and …

30
Reg Saddler on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

31
Devialet’s Hi-Tech “Phantom” Implosion Stereo Sounds Better Than Speakers 20X Its Size

You need a big sub-woofer for big bass, right? Wrong. After 10 years of research, French acoustic engineers as Devialet just unveiled a giant step forward in audio that’s just one foot long. The Phantom is a petite, spherical, all-in-one amplifier and speaker that delivers what audiophiles think may be the best sound in the world for around $2,000.

32
North Korea's Internet Is Down After Sony Hack Accusations

Of course, there’s no concrete evidence to link North Korea’s internet blackout to retaliation by the United States – this could just be a unrelated outage in a country with already limited internet access. The White House for its part declined to comment to the AP, but the timing seems awfully fishy.

33
The best e-reader you can buy

Here’s how I read on a tablet: I open the Kindle app. I read for somewhere between four and nine seconds. A notification pops up: I have a new email or someone tweeted a funny link at me. I tap on that notification, and check out whatever’s come in. I check Twitter, and then maybe I’ll just play a quick game of FIFA before I get to my subway stop. Wait, was I doing something?

34
Why the Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua Could Be a Very Bad Idea | WIRED

But even the economic benefits aren’t guaranteed. The Panama canal celebrates its 100th birthday this year, and it’s nearing the end of a $5.25 billion expansion project. When the new and improved canal opens early next year, it will allow ships with three times the cargo capacity to pass through, and it will handle up to 16,000 ships a year, roughly a 15 to 20 percent increase, says Jean-Paul Rodrigue, an expert on transportation economics at Hofstra University. “It’s going to take a while for this capacity to be absorbed, if it ever is,” Rodrigue says. “In the medium term, there will not be a need for another canal.”

35
Disney World starts accepting Apple Pay and Google Wallet this week

Making a trip to Walt Disney World during the holidays? You might not avoid the long queues or endless parking lots, but you won't always have to pull out your wallet. As promised back in September, the Orlando area theme park will start accepting mobile payments on December 24th. The launch will let you use Apple Pay, Google Wallet and tap-to-pay credit cards to buy tickets, shop at stores and order from both bars and fast service restaurants. There are a few gaps. The system doesn't yet work at places that need a portable payment terminal, so you'll still have to break out the cash or plastic at a table service restaurant. You'll also have to wait until 2015 to get similar treatment at Disneyland in California. But hey, it's a start -- and it may save you a few headaches the next time you're jonesing to take a ride at Space Mountain.

36
Take A Ride On America's Top 10 Bike Lanes

PeopleForBikes recently named its 10 favorite projects, at the top of which is a bike lane on Polk Street, San Francisco, that opened in April. Roskowski likes it because it's nice to ride on, completely separated from cars, and because it wasn't an "easy project." It flows against other traffic, and the people who pushed for it faced plenty of opposition, she says.

37
You can now buy HP's Chromebook 14 with a 1080p touchscreen

We've said that the mediocre screen on HP's Chromebook 14 " kills the whole appeal of an otherwise solid Chromebook, " and it seems HP may have come to the same realization. Recently, HP introduced the option to purchase its Chromebook 14 with a 1080p touchscreen. So not only is it sharper than the default panel (and perfect for Netflix), but you get the benefit of using Chrome OS through touch — if that's something you'd prefer versus a trackpad. Just as you'd expect, the better screen comes at a higher price.

38
Web freedom groups criticize state attorney general for Goliath action

Dear Attorney General Hood: According to recent news reports, your office, in active coordination with the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) and its member companies, has been and remains engaged in a coordinated campaign to shut down and block access to individual websites through backdoor methods resoundingly rejected by the public and federal lawmakers. Publications including The New York Times , The Huffington Post , and The Verge are reporting that the MPAA responded to the failure of the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) in 2012 by quietly searching for alternate means to accomplish key provisions of the bill, such as website blocking and search filtering. It is our understanding that those efforts include developing legal theories and even drafting civil investigation demand letters for state attorneys general to facilitate actions against websites and search engines. The goal of these efforts mirrors the goal of SOPA: to create new legal tools that will compel online service providers to remove content from the Internet with little, if any, meaningful due process.

39
Safeguard Your Online Activity & Access Territory-Restricted Websites – Even Works On Your Mobile Devices

Safeguard Your Online Activity & Access Territory-Restricted Websites – Even Works On Your Mobile Devices

40
NASA scientists propose sending humans to the skies of Venus

Venus might be closer to Earth, but that doesn't make it easier to explore than Mars. For starters, the surface of Venus has the pressure of 92 of Earth's atmospheres, to say nothing of the temperatures — which can reach more than 900 degrees Fahrenheit (500 degrees C), heat that can melt lead. But two NASA scientists, Dale Arney and Chris Jones, suggest we skip the surface altogether and stick to Venus's clouds, according to a report in IEEE Spectrum.

41
12 things that can wait until after you binge-watch

While some may suggest you stray away from this odyssey, we propose the opposite. Indulge, streaming warrior, indulge. But to be a true binge-watcher, there are many daily to-do's that you must put aside.

42
Google unveils the first complete version of its self-driving car

Google had a (not very well-kept) secret when it unveiled its experimental self-driving car : that first example you saw was just a mockup that lacked many of the basics. At last, however, the internet giant has unveiled a complete prototype of the car that has everything it needs to hit the road, including the autonomous driving system and typical mechanical parts like braking, lighting and steering. Yes, it still looks like a koala on wheels, but this motorized marsupial is now ready to hit the test track. It'll also reach Northern California roads sometime next year, so don't be surprised if you see a cutesy driverless vehicle puttering around your local streets.

43
Neon Photo App Imparts a Holiday Spirit To Your Images

AKVIS Neon lets you create striking glowing line effects that transform photos into shining drawings with painterly attributes for a festive look — great for holiday cards, invitations or family newsletters. You can create eye-catching luminous backgrounds, abstract paintings, illustrations for photo books, posters, flyers and more.

44
The Rise of Disability Tech

Speech synthesis can be used in a number of ways to support those in need. Primarily, it’s to help people communicate with others. The most famous example of this has to be Stephen Hawking, who uses the technology to turn words into audio. However, it’s also used by the visually impaired, with most operating systems offering software to read text aloud. It means they can get through simple tasks, such as reading a message, without any bother.

45
The Limited Edition Code Black Drone + HD Camera is Back

The Code Black Drone is so popular it flew off our shelves during our first two sales – but we now have limited units back in stock at TNW Deals, for just $89 for the HD camera version and $69 for the SD camera version (available in the continental US).

46
The Corporate 'Internet Of Things' Will Encompass More Devices Than The Smartphone And Tablet Markets Combined

In a new IoT report from BI Intelligence, we size the enterprise IoT market, noting the breakdown between hardware versus software spending, and determine which industries will upgrade to the IoT first. We examine how businesses are already using IoT systems and what barriers might still stand in the way of IoT enterprise upgrades.

47
Mercury Once Oozed With Lava—Until the Planet Shrank | WIRED

According to Byrne, the history of Mercury might have gone something like this: Early on, eruptions were spilling lava all over the planet. But as Mercury cooled, its shrinking began to squeeze off the lava. For a time, major comet and asteroid impacts could have thinned the crust enough to allow some lava to erupt from the impact basins, but eventually, the planet contracted so much that even this stopped. The 3.8-billion-year-old lava that flowed in those basins were thus the last of Mercury’s surface lava. And indeed, the youngest lava plains are all found in the biggest impact basins.

48
How to Become the Content Innovator In Your Organization

There’s no denying that selling your organization on content will be tough, but the results make it well worth the effort. So, how do you champion this idea and convince your company to embrace content?

49
Photos: See the Progress on NYC's Long-Awaited 2nd Avenue Subway | WIRED

For New Yorkers, the Second Avenue Subway is something of a punchline, an accepted local synonym for “when pigs fly.” It’s easy to see why: City officials have been talking about a second line on Manhattan’s East Side since the 1920s , and the construction has been delayed so many times that former man-in-charge Michael Bloomberg says he’s got a 50-50 shot at living to see it open (he’s 72).

50
This drone porn isn't real, it's just really creepy

At the time the website for DroneHunter.com was just a landing page with a cartoon drone and some text informing visitors it was "under construction." But when I clicked through the link at the bottom for customer support, I was redirected to a service site run by Mofos.com. That turned out to be a porn company owned by Mindgeek, a massive conglomerate that owns dozens of different sites, including, you guessed it, Pornhub. I emailed Mike to ask what was happening, but he plead ignorance, saying Mindgeek was a sprawling empire where lots of sites act independently.

51 Halo Nightfall star Mike Colter will play Luke Cage on Netflix
52 Here's 3 Minutes Of Daredevils Being Unbelievably Awesome In 2014
53 Olympic Games costume drama may be over — 14 years later
54 Why Sony's Breach Matters
55 BAIAblog: Salvatore Sanfilippo, the author of Redis: from Sicily with talent and passion
56 Maestro Of The Midwest: For The Future Of American Eating, Look To Columbus
57 Could you learn to code in a day?
58 Hypnotic GIFs That Get Better the Longer You Stare at Them | WIRED
59 Sony hack: How cybercrime just got even more complicated | ZDNet
60 An Indonesian beetle just joined the list of animals named after David Attenborough
61 Soon Your Tech Will Talk to You Through Your Skin | WIRED
62 The Blackberry Classic Is A Noble Throwback To The QWERTY Era
63 The Story Behind Star Wars's Forgotten Christmas Album
64 How To Make Yourself Unplug For The Entire Holiday Break
65 What Basketball Would Be Like If We All Had Portal Guns
66 The Oatmeal got to ride in Google's self-driving car
67 The Best Kids' Design Of 2014
68 Twitter Users Can Now Track Tweet Impressions, Engagement Numbers Right In The iOS App
69 Google Will Finally Make It Really Easy To Look Up Song Lyrics
70 Google Play would be the perfect host for 'The Interview'
71 Experts Skeptical North Korea Hacked Sony
72 6 Tips To Stay Productive During The Holidays
73 Seldon Wants to Make Life Easier for Data Scientists
74 Yahoo's Aviate launcher for Android gets universal search
75 The Tor network is bracing for a possible attack
76 The Best and Worst in a Tumultuous Year for Science | WIRED
77 Wanderers: 3D-printed spacewear for medieval Arab astronauts - CNET
78 In Israel, Startups Race Toward Exit
79 The Best Christmas Tree Money Can Buy
80 Tempo For iOS Updated with New Widget and Notifications
81 Reg Saddler on Twitter
82 Built In Brooklyn: Farmigo Brings Local Produce To Schools, Offices, And Homes
83 Everplans Raises New Cash To Expand Its End-Of-Life Planning Services
84 15 Last-Minute Gifts That Will Help You Save Christmas | WIRED
85 The Internet of Anything: An Accelerator That'll Churn Out Startups for VR's Bright Future | WIRED
86 Facebook’s Money-Making Solution To App Discovery? A Whole Feed Of Install Ads
87 10 travel stocking stuffers for last-minute shoppers
88 The 24 Best Photo Essays Of 2014
89 The Best User Interfaces Of 2014
90 Samsung Releases Look At Me, An App For Autistic Kids
91 Exploits Circulating for Remote Code Execution Flaws in NTP Protocol
92 Apple Will Earn $3 Billion Because The iPhone 6 Starts With A Pitiful Amount Of Storage
93 2014: The Year of Living Vulnerably