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Nissan’s self-parking office chair is here to make your Monday better

Technically, today is a holiday. You should probably have the time off, but you don't. You're here at the office, trying to catch up on email and a glut of busywork. I feel you. And so does Nissan....

A brief history of squid video

The squid’s eye is trained on the camera, dilating to the size of a saucer as it steadily draws nearer. Its skin looks as soft as satin, rippling delicately as it siphons water into its mantle. Just a few feet under the surface, its long tentacles, each a girthy strip of vermillion tie-dye, sewed up with an endless avenue of suckers, hover listlessly. The slow intake of a diver’s respirator, followed by the tinkle of a stream of bubbles, is the only noise in the video.

GameStop CEO: PlayStation VR will ship this fall

Still no word on price, though.

Where the hell is 'Kentucky Route Zero?'

The fourth act is Cardboard Computer's most mysterious yet, mostly because it's been two years in the making.

Samsung's upcoming Galaxy S7 might work in the rain

An official Samsung video appears to depict the Galaxy S7 Edge in use in the rain.

Abandoned baby sea otter finds a new home

El Niño can't keep this baby otter from a happy home.

'Jet Set Radio' is absolutely free on Steam

Sega really does understand the Concept of Love.

This dog is no match for a wild bobcat, no matter what it thinks

A bobcat wandered up to the back door of a home in Ontario, Canada, and their family dog did not like it one bit.

Would 'The Revenant' as an old-timey silent movie still get an Oscar nom?

Silent movies return to the big screen with this reimagined trailer for 'The Revenant.'

Radio Flyer now makes a Tesla Model S for kids

It's a great time to be a kid if you like tiny, expensive, electric vehicles. Last week, a company called Actev debuted the Arrow Kart, an extremely smart go-kart with a top speed of 12 miles per...

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Watch Kendrick Lamar's stunning performance from the 2016 Grammys

After being  teased as a "very controversial" performance by host LL Cool J, Kendrick Lamar hit the 2016 Grammy stage and did not disappoint. The rapper delivered the performance of the night, walking out as part of a chain gang to perform "The Blacker The Berry" with his band locked inside jail cells.

4
Deadpool crushes rated R record with $135 million opening weekend

Deadpool isn't your typical superhero movie. The red spandex-clad hero played by Ryan Reynolds isn't just irreverant and self-aware — he's downright raunchy. That solidly earned the film an R rating (18+ without an adult), but that hasn't stopped the film from being a box office success. Over its first weekend in the US, Deadpool is now estimated to haul in over $135 million. That makes it the best opening weekend ever for an R-rated film — by far.

5
Space Is Cold, Vast, and Deadly. Humans Will Explore It Anyway

Pulling the sats out of orbit isn’t realistic—it would take a whole mission to capture just one. So starting now, all satellites will have to fall out of orbit on their own. They’ll jettison extra fuel, then use rocket boosters or solar sails to angle down and burn up on reentry. Put decommissioning programs in 90 percent of new launches or you’ll get the Kessler syndrome: One collision leads to more collisions until there’s so much crap up there, no one can fly at all. That might be a century hence—or a lot sooner if space war breaks out. If someone (like China?) starts blowing up enemy satellites, “it would be a disaster,” says Holger Krag, head of the Space Debris Office at the European Space Agency. Essential to the future of space travel: world peace. —Jason Kehe

6 How BuzzFeed's Jonah Peretti Is Building A 100-Year Media Company

BuzzFeed is Peretti’s vision, shaped by his restless curiosity. In high school, he saved his money from doing yard work to buy a Macintosh computer. He discovered the Netscape browser as a sophomore in college, and upon graduation from the University of California, Santa Cruz, interviewed at a tech startup but decided that a $24,000-per-year job teaching computers at a private school in New Orleans was more interesting. He landed at the MIT Media Lab, where his thesis was a software authoring tool for the classroom. Cofounding The Huffington Post in 2005 was Peretti’s introduction to startups and business, but a year later, he wanted to go off and experiment again. HuffPo’s investors gave him a little seed capital because "they wanted me to be able to keep doing Huffington Post," he says. "It was like, ‘Oh, Jonah’s doing his little R&D lab.’ " He stayed on until 2011, when AOL acquired HuffPo for $315 million. Only then did BuzzFeed become Peretti’s sole focus.

7
Ashley Graham is first plus-size model to grace Sports Illustrated cover

In recent years, the magazine has shown a progressive movement toward body diversity. While Graham is the first plus-size model to make the cover, the magazine also featured model Robyn Lawley in an editorial spread last year.

8 Judge tells Apple to help FBI access San Bernardino shooters' iPhone

After a couple shot 14 people in San Bernardino, CA before being killed themselves on December 2nd, the authorities recovered a locked iPhone. Since then, the FBI has complained it is unable to break the device's encryption, in a case that it has implied supports its desire for tech companies to make sure it can always have a way in. Today the Associated Press reports that a US magistrate judge has directed Apple to help the FBI find a way in. There's no word on exactly which model of iPhone was recovered, but Apple has said that at least as of iOS 8 it does not have a way to bypass the passcode on a locked phone.

9 The World's 50 Most Innovative Companies

The stumbling blocks that some of our Most Innovative Companies have faced on their journeys to success and what they learned along the way.

10
Being Bilingual Changes the Architecture of Your Brain

Of course, any bilingual person will tell you that sometimes they don’t bother making a choice. When I talk to other people who speak English and Spanish, I often mix the languages together, saying things like, “Quieres un toast?” and “I wanted to aprovechar the holiday and viajar un poco.” If I want to maximize the cognitive benefits of speaking two languages, should I stop mixing and force my brain through the gymnastics every time I open my mouth? In short: no. “Back in the 1980s, people claimed that language mixing was pathological,” Kroll said. “It’s actually a normal and typical part of bilingual experience.” Plus, it’s not like my brain is slacking off. I’m still choosing between languages with every word, it’s just that I’m not making the same choice every time.

11
Space Is Cold, Vast, and Deadly. Humans Will Explore It Anyway

Pulling the sats out of orbit isn’t realistic—it would take a whole mission to capture just one. So starting now, all satellites will have to fall out of orbit on their own. They’ll jettison extra fuel, then use rocket boosters or solar sails to angle down and burn up on reentry. Put decommissioning programs in 90 percent of new launches or you’ll get the Kessler syndrome: One collision leads to more collisions until there’s so much crap up there, no one can fly at all. That might be a century hence—or a lot sooner if space war breaks out. If someone (like China?) starts blowing up enemy satellites, “it would be a disaster,” says Holger Krag, head of the Space Debris Office at the European Space Agency. Essential to the future of space travel: world peace. —Jason Kehe

12
The NSA’s SKYNET program may be killing thousands of innocent people

As The Intercept reported, Zaidan frequently travels to regions with known terrorist activity in order to interview insurgents and report the news. But rather than questioning the machine learning that produced such a bizarre result, the NSA engineers behind the algorithm instead trumpeted Zaidan as an example of a SKYNET success in their in-house presentation, including a slide that labelled Zaidan as a "MEMBER OF AL-QA'IDA."

13
Instagram Finally Adds Two-Factor Authentication To Fight Hackers

Instagram accounts are worth stealing. Now at 400 million users including celebrities, brands, and artists making a living, it’s time to add another lock to its doors. In November I wrote that “Seriously, Instagram Needs Two-Factor Authentication” , and a tipster just told me they’ve spotted it in testing. Today, Instagram confirmed to me that it’s beginning to roll out two-factor authentication.

14
Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan Invests in Indian Startup Snapdeal

Indian e-commerce company Snapdeal.com on Monday bucked a slowdown in startup investments in India, securing $200 million from the Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan and others.

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Eagles of Death Metal take the stage in Paris, picking up right where they left off

The show was open to fans who were at the Nov. 13 show at the Bataclan. The band had hoped to perform this week's show at that venue, but the theater has still not reopened following the attack. Ahead of Tuesday's performance, military police lined the entrance, checking fans who lined up for the show. 25 mental health professionals were also on hand in case anyone in the crowd needed support.

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Google Ideas Think Tank To Become Tech Incubator Called Jigsaw

"The world is asking what role technology companies should have in addressing global security challenges, many of which we are encountering for the first time," Eric Schmidt, Google Ideas cofounder and Alphabet executive chairman, said in a statement. "Jigsaw is a model for how we approach these issues—collaboratively and with an eye toward solutions.... [M]aking the Internet more free and open is, for many citizens around the world, a matter of life and death. Jigsaw is a reflection of our commitment to helping people to address these threats."

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There's suddenly a new sports car brand in Europe, and it's awesome

This car is no joke. A mid-mounted turbocharged four promises 0-62 mph times under 4.5 seconds, which puts the Alpine Vision solidly in Porsche 718 Cayman territory — and if the company can come anywhere close to this concept's interior, they're in a good place. (The press materials claim that the Vision represents roughly 80 percent of the production car.) And it sounds like corporate parent Renault is giving Alpine a lot of latitude to execute on the project, calling it "an agile start-up" that is being led by its own team.

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Even Barbie gets a smart home and a drone in 2016

Light control features go beyond voice control too; by pressing a button built into the floor of each room, it "wakes up" the area so it knows you're ready to play (e.g. the fireplace will turn on if the living room button is activated). This is how the room knows when Barbie is nearby and can react accordingly. It requires a power source, so you'll also need to set it up near an outlet.

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The art of making a fully electric 1959 Volkswagen Beetle

Paused at a stoplight, my passenger and I look over at a Smart ForTwo idling next to us, and I make the universal finger-rolling motion of, “Wanna race?” The driver ignores us. But when the light goes green, the guy stomps on the gas and the tiny city car scoots forward with a faint squeal of the front tires.

20
Mark Zuckerberg’s Uphill Battle

To hear the reaction in India to Facebook’s effort to bring free Internet access to the country, you’d think it was sponsored by the British East India Company and signified a return to colonial rule. In contrast, the reaction in the U.S. to a decision by India’s Internet regulator that Facebook’s “Free Basics” is banned in the country was, at least initially, dismissive to the point of being patronizing.

21
American Airlines knows Gogo's in-flight WiFi sucks

Sick of horrendously slow in-flight WiFi? It turns out you're not alone. American Airlines just filed suit against Gogo, the leading WiFi provider for most airlines, for not living up to its claims of matching or exceeding competitor speeds. Specifically, American Airlines discovered that Gogo rival, ViaSat , offered "materially" improved service over Gogo's older cell tower technology. As per terms of Gogo's contract, American Airlines is then allowed to terminate the agreement with Gogo and seek services elsewhere. The suit comes at a rather inopportune time for Gogo, as it's been trying to get airlines interested in its faster 70mpbs satellite-based service called 2ku -- you can read about our experience with it when we took it for a spin a few months ago. It's clear that satellite-based tech is a lot more robust; it can stream video content from Netflix, Twitch and more. As promising as that sounds however, there are several concerns over how fast the speeds can truly be under real-world circumstances as well as how the pricing structure will look like. Regardless of these barriers, it looks like Gogo had better figure out how to get its WiFi service up to snuff before other airlines follow with lawsuits of their own.

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How to Optimize Your Facebook Posts With Facebook Audience Insights : Social Media Examiner

PoolSupplyWorld is an online pool supply company that has become somewhat famous for their engaging and witty Facebook page, which boasts over 99,000 fans. Broadly speaking, if you managed this Facebook page, you might be interested in the purchase behavior of homeowners over the age of 25. According to Facebook Insights, this demographic is 17% more likely to purchase pet products than the general Facebook population.

23
Apple Pay will finally launch in China this week

With China being the world’s most populous country, it seems surprising to think that Apple took this long to implement the payment system there. China is the fifth country Apple Pay will go live in, after launching in the US, Canada, UK and Australia in 2015.

24
Birchbox Co-Founder Hayley Barna Joins First Round Capital as First Female Partner

Barna will be based in New York City and focus on consumer startups in e-commerce and beyond. She had been advising and making small investments in startups after leaving Birchbox six months ago, where she had overseen tech, marketing and operations since co-founding the online beauty retailer in 2010.

25
1Password launches a family plan that lets five people share passwords

The subscription will be available for $5 per month for a family of five, with additional people added at $1 per month. It's a lot cheaper than 1Password's business solution, which runs $5 per person, though it's more expensive than buying the app outright — a $50 purchase lets you use 1Password on six computers throughout a household. But there are benefits to the subscription that parents may like. They'll be able to restore a child's access to their account should they lose their password to 1Password itself. They can also choose to share passwords but prevent kids from editing them, ensuring that they won't be accidentally changed or deleted. The family plan also handles password syncing on its own, rather than requiring you to use an outside service like Dropbox.

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Fashion and technology find common ground in a new exhibition

Edgar began hitting newsrooms at a young age, when his dad worked at a newspaper back in the 90s. Growing up, he had two passions: technology and football (soccer). If he wasn't on the pitch scoring hat-tricks, he could be found near his SNES or around the house taking things apart. Edgar's also deeply in love with tacos, Jordan sneakers and FIFA, in no particular order . He lives in New York City with his better half.

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China’s Factories Hunt for Growing Markets

SHENZHEN, China—As global investors fret over the health of China’s stuttering economy, some battered manufacturers in the industrial south are pinning their hopes on moving up the technology ladder. Inside the factory of struggling electronics maker Shenzhen Rapoo Technology Co., robotic arms that for years swiveled and bent to churn out computer mice and keyboards are now reaching further up the gadget spectrum: making consumer...

28
The Arrow Is the Smart Go-Kart You Deserved as a Kid

Should is a deliberate word choice, both because battery life estimates are notoriously fickle (and in this case will depend on your manner of driving) and because the consumer version of the Arrow Smart-Kart does not actually exist yet. While the company’s accepting pre-orders now, the product doesn’t actually ship until June. That long of a timeline might rightly make you nervous, but the karts Actev is bringing to the Toy Fair are fully functional production prototypes, and Bell is “pretty confident” he can meet the stated date.

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How to Taste Wine and Make it Look Like You Know What You're Doing

The most often-skipped step in tasting a wine is the swirl. With the glass flat on a table, grab the bottom of the stem and swirl it vigorously—you want to increase the surface area of the wine and aerate it, which will release more of its aromas. Don’t swirl it for more than five or six seconds though; it’s not a cocktail. Get a sense of the wine’s viscosity, or “legs.” You can judge the legs by watching for the streaks of wine that crawl down the glass after you swirl it. Bigger wines, with more sugar and/or alcohol, will have more pronounced legs, but ultimately they don’t tell you much about its taste or quality.

30
This LED display uses Twitter's emotions to create art

As perhaps best evidenced by Kanye West , Twitter can be a mess of emotions. Now there’s an art project inspired and influenced by this range of feelings.

31
Homer Simpson will broadcast live, with some motion-capture help

The Simpsons , live! Well, at least partially. In a new episode set to broadcast on Sunday May 15, Homer Simpson will speak live to viewers, commenting on the day's news as well as answering fans' questions. (You can can tweet your queries to him starting in early May, using the #homerlive hashtag.) How is that even possible? According to The Wrap , it apparently involves a "first for animation", tying together motion capture, real-time animation and some all-important improvisation.

32
Fast-Growing Photo App Everalbum, A Chart-Topper On iOS, Comes To Android

Everalbum protects your life's photos so you never have to worry about losing them. Across devices and photo sources, Everalbum automatically backs up your photos and videos so you can access them at any time. You can then free up space on your device by removing photos from your camera roll.

33
Kanye West's 'Life of Pablo' has been pirated half a million times

Speaking to the BBC — which also reported that the Recording Industry Association of America has already filed almost 20 takedown requests to Google — TorrentFreak's rep said, "I haven't seen numbers this high before for a music release — not with Adele either."

34
Apple suppliers had 'very good' January following tough December, analyst says

Taiwanese Apple suppliers experienced a "very good" January, financially, despite Apple "putting on the breaks extra hard" the previous month, Drexel Hamilton analyst Brian White said on Tuesday.

35
Amazon acquires Indian payments processor Emvantage

(Reuters) — Amazon.com said it has acquired Indian payments processor Emvantage Payments for an undisclosed sum.

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Ninja Warrior on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

37
Amazon introduces one-hour restaurant delivery in San Diego

Prime Now one-hour delivery usually incurs a surcharge but Amazon is offering restaurant orders at no additional cost, provided they meet the $20 minimum order amount. With the likes of Postmates and DoorDash charging a $4 delivery fee, Amazon may be undercutting its rivals.

38
Line's new camera app helps you take better food photos

The flat lay feature is certainly useful for quickly snapping overhead shots of your meals, and you can turn on filters even before you shoot. However, Foodie doesn’t let you adjust the strength of each filter’s effects, which means they can make some shots look a little too processed.

39
Line is shutting down former Microsoft service MixRadio

The closure is not solely due to financial reasons, though: Line notes that the "priorities of Line Corporation" also played a part in the decision. In June last year, the company's CEO, Takeshi Idezawa, said that after years of trying to attract users globally, Line's  main priority is Asia . The app has some  215 million monthly users, but  65 percent of these are in its four core markets: Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, and Indonesia. As TechCrunch notes , the company has been developing localized services for these countries, partnering with Indonesian motorbike taxi app Go-Jek, for example. Similarly, although MixRadio is being shut down, the company continues to operate its Line Music streaming service in Japan and Thailand.

40
Pirates prove Kanye's new album isn't really Tidal-exclusive

How this mass piracy will affect the future release of The Life of Pablo remains to be seen -- West obviously wants to use this release to push Tidal adoption, and there are some signs that it's working. The app is number one on the iOS app store free apps list, just a few weeks after Rihanna's Tidal-exclusive pushed the app up to number 12 on the free apps charts. It didn't stay there for long last time, but if Kanye truly eschews all other music stores and streaming services, Tidal's performance on the app charts will be worth keeping an eye on. Regardless of how well Tidal does, though, it seems pretty clear that West is leaving some up-front cash on the table by not keeping his album for sale through his own site or retailers like iTunes and Amazon.

41
Hideo Kojima Reunites With Norman Reedus - IGN

In a post on Twitter , Kojima shared a photo of the two of them together, saying he met with the actor to provide an update on his new studio:

42
Running your models in production with TensorFlow Serving

Posted by Noah Fiedel, Software Engineer Machine learning powers many Google product features, from speech recognition in the Google app to Smart Reply in Inbox to search in Google Photos . While decades of experience have enabled the software industry to establish best practices for building and supporting products, doing so for services based upon machine learning introduces new and interesting challenges . Today, we announce the release of TensorFlow Serving , designed to address some of these challenges. TensorFlow Serving is a high performance, open source serving system for machine learning models, designed for production environments and optimized for TensorFlow . TensorFlow Serving is ideal for running multiple models, at large scale, that change over time based on real-world data, enabling: model lifecycle management experiments with multiple algorithms efficient use of GPU resources TensorFlow Serving makes the process of taking a model into production easier and faster. It allows you to safely deploy new models and run experiments while keeping the same server architecture and APIs.

43
IBM Bets on Bitcoin Ledger

International Business Machines Inc. is becoming the biggest backer of a technology that underpins the Bitcoin digital currency. In the coming year, IBM will begin testing its own variation on the transactional software known as blockchain, aiming to simplify life for customers who lease IBM’s computer hardware, the company said.

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IBM launches z13s, entry mainframe with enhanced security | ZDNet

The z13s is designed for hybrid cloud deployments and can encrypt and decrypt data twice as fast as the previous version.

45 'Black Ops 3' is $15 on Steam in a multiplayer-only edition

So, you haven't played Call of Duty: Black Ops 3 but you don't want to throw down $60 for an online shooter that you might not enjoy. Activision has you covered with the Call of Duty: Black Ops 3 Multiplayer Starter Pack -- it's $15 on Steam and includes access to public ranked multiplayer matches, the Weapon Paint Shop, Gunsmith customization system, Black Market trading post, and Arena, Free Run and Theater modes. The pack is available from February 16th to the 29th.

46
InVision has acquired startup design firm Waybury

The Waybury team will join InVision, and say they’re in the process of figuring out what to do with Iconic and Relay. Both products seem a natural fit for InVision, so I’d expect them to be folded into InVision’s portfolio in short order.

47
U.S. wants Apple to help unlock iPhone used by San Bernardino shooter

The Silicon Valley giant has steadfastly maintained it is unable to unlock its newer iPhones for law enforcement, even when officers obtain a warrant, because they are engineered in such a way that Apple does not hold the decryption key. Only the phone’s user would be able to unlock the phone — or someone who knew the password.

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Announcing our 2016 TED Prize winner: Satellite archaeologist Sarah Parcak

She’s best described as the modern-day Indiana Jones. Using infrared imagery from satellites, she identifies ancient sites lost in time. In Egypt, she helped locate 17 potential pyramids, plus 1,000 forgotten tombs and 3,100 unknown settlements. And that’s in addition to her discoveries throughout the Roman Empire.

49
Life After Deadpool: Ryan Reynolds Heading to Mars - IGN

According to Deadline , Reynolds could star in the movie alongside Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation's Rebecca Ferguson. Written by Deadpool scribes Paul Wernick and Rhett Reese—and directed by Safe House's Daniel Espinosa—Life explores "intelligent alien life" on Mars.

50
Elgato launches the HomeKit-enabled Eve Energy smart plug that can track energy use

It’s called the Eve Energy, and it’s a smart plug that can help you track your energy usage as the days pass by. The Energy is technically a smart switch, which allows the owner to control a variety of different smart-connected appliances within the home, all from the iPhone. You’ll just need to plug the Energy into a wall socket, and have every other smart product going, and you’ll be able to track the energy consumption of those products over a set period of time:

51 Leonardo DiCaprio's Oscar Desperation Makes for Great 8-Bit Gaming
52 This hilarious note to a guy who lost his wallet is so New York
53 Google's Project Loon Ready for Real-World Testing Soon
54 Run the Deepest Diagnostic Testing Available to Keep Your Mac Running Smoothly
55 You can now buy a .cloud domain name
56 The U.S. reportedly planned a major cyber attack on Iran if diplomacy failed
57 Hologram K-pop concerts are a big thing in South Korea right now
58 PlayStation VR delayed till fall? Not necessarily
59 How BuzzFeed's Jonah Peretti Is Building A 100-Year Media Company
60 Humanoid highlighters have come to Earth to teach us much knowledge
61 Kanye West Says His New Album Won’t Be On iTunes Or Apple Music
62 Reddit photoshops this triumphant Taylor Swift
63 Help Leo win an Oscar in 'Red Carpet Rampage'
64 SEGA Giving Away Jet Set Radio HD and More on Steam - IGN
65 Rapper Lupe Fiasco Beats Street Fighter Legend in Tournament
66 The Jaguar F-Type SVR is the fastest cat in the world
67 Old photo of a smokin' hot grandpa is setting hearts ablaze
68 Call of Duty: Black Ops III now has a cheaper, multiplayer-only version on PC
69 MIT Tech Review on Twitter
70 Friday Night Tykes on Twitter
71 Twitter not reliable predictor of election outcomes: study
72 Lawsuit accuses actress Jessica Alba's website fraudulent labeling
73 Ninja Warrior on Twitter
74 Watch two Teslas race head to head in Ludicrous Mode
75 How to switch on Siri's secret reading powers
76 VAIO, Toshiba, and Fujitsu to unite into a new PC giant
77 Fantasy Sports Industry Mounts Lobbying Blitz
78 No, A Judge Did Not Just Order Apple To Break Encryption On San Bernardino Shooter's iPhone, But To Create A New Backdoor | Techdirt
79 After Zenefits, Will VCs Rein in Their Unicorns?
80 Flux Party seeks to be the bitcoin of Australian politics
81 How to set any song as iPhone ringtone without using iTunes
82 Mashable GIF on Twitter
83 Mashable GIF on Twitter
84 Giphy Closes $55 Million Series C At A $300 Million Post-Money Valuation
85 The Internet Of Medicine Is Just What The Doctor Ordered
86 Glibc: Mega bug may hit thousands of devices - BBC News
87 Friday Night Tykes on Twitter
88 Congress shouldn't force encryption 'backdoors,' says key House Democrat