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Scaling Docker with Swarm

We are extremely excited to announce the first beta release of Swarm, a native clustering tool for Docker. For the past two years, Docker has made the lives of millions of developers easier by maki...

This smartwatch comes with a separate screen that doubles as a battery

The Neptune Duo promises a wearable that lets you make calls from your wrist, with a battery pack that doubles as a second display.

America can't handle the cuteness of a 2-year-old singing National Anthem

Two-year-olds are bad at many things, but charming a crowd is not one of them.

Real-life superheroes perch on skyscrapers in dizzying photo series

Benjamin Von Wong photographed people atop skyscrapers dressed as their favorite comic book superheroes and villains.

Groovy senior citizens are too hot in 'Uptown Funk' cover

A group of senior citizens recreated the music video to "Uptown Funk."

Stoats are the cutest creature we've all been sleeping on

A stoat, also known as a short tailed weasel, plays around after being rescued.

Elderly husband and wife pass away within hours of each other

Floyd Hartwig passes away, and his wife of 67 years, Violet, died only five hours later.

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Top News
1
Docker Launches Its Container Orchestration Tools

“The truth is, Docker as a platform is about enabling the ecosystem because its core value is in application portability,” Docker’s VP of Marketing David Messina told me, adding that Docker’s list of partners really speaks for itself. He also noted that nobody is forced to use Docker’s own tools. Its APIs are open, after all, and Docker’s own orchestration tools use them, too. The company likes to call this approach “batteries included but swappable.”

2
Google Starts Testing Mobile App Ads In The Google Play Store

Google announced this morning the launch of a pilot program which will allow mobile application developers the ability to advertise their apps directly within the Google Play store. These ads, which will initially be made available to advertisers already running search ads on Google.com, will also only be shown against Google Play search results. That is, they won’t just randomly appear in other sections of Google Play, like category pages or stuffed in the middle of Google Play’s Top Charts.

3
Google Mulling 'Strategic Investment' in Device Maker Jawbone

Google is considering making what several sources close to the situation describe as a “strategic investment” in Jawbone, the high-profile San Francisco maker of a number of wireless and wearable devices such as the Up fitness tracker.

4
Google Makes “Mobile-Friendliness” A Ranking Signal Worldwide, Boosts Indexed Apps In Search Results

Google today announced two notable changes that will affect the rankings of search results for users accessing Google search on mobile devices. It will now take into consideration a site’s mobile-friendliness as one of its ranking signals, and information from indexed mobile applications will also begin to influence ranking for signed-in users who have the app installed on their smartphone.

5
The first full-scale Hyperloop test track may launch in California next year

Musk is already building his own Hyperloop test track in Texas, but HTT says Musk's track is a scaled-down model, allowing for easier testing of the physics involved. HTT's track will be designed for human passengers, testing the passenger systems, but will come with other limitations. With only five miles of track, the craft will top out at just 200mph rather than the 760mph predicted in Musk's initial documents. "It's not about speed," Ahlborn told The Verge . "There are a lot of other things that need to be optimized."

6
Embracing SQL In Postgres - Rob Conery

When you’re working with your data you need a first-class general-purpose programming language. I put up with all the teething problems of e.g. Hadoop/Spark because it means I can manipulate my data in a real programming language. And it’s why when I’m working with an SQL database I still treat it as a dumb key-value store whose only job is to hand the data over to my application. Because I know that if I start trying to write actual business logic in SQL, I’ll inevitably bump against its limits soon enough.

7
Softcard shuts down mobile apps after Google deal, leaving Windows Phone in the cold

Following the Google deal that effort is effectively over. Part of Google’s agreement with Softcard makes Wallet the go-to payment platform on devices running Android KitKat (and eventually above) from the three Softcard carriers. That means the Softcard shut down won’t impact Android users in any meaningful way. But the short-lived Softcard app on Windows Phone—it debuted in November—was the sole viable mobile payment option for Microsoft’s mobile users in the U.S..

8
In-flight internet provider Gogo's quarterly revenue jumps

(Reuters) - Gogo Inc ( GOGO.O ), an in-flight internet services provider, gave a full-year revenue forecast range that was largely above analysts' average expectation, driven by a surge in demand from commercial and business aviation clients.

9
The Secret Million That Y Combinator Invests In All Its Startups

But what makes Transcriptic truly special—and the reason Silicon Valley investors have been clamoring to give Hodak their money—is that you don’t have to be in the Bay Area to use it. Anyone, anywhere in the world, can order an experiment using Transcriptic’s web interface, paying for lab time by the hour, the same way startups buy cloud-based server time from Amazon Web Services. (Any materials or chemical compounds are shipped directly to Transcriptic’s office for an additional fee.) "The value of any drug company is in the drugs that it has and the drugs that it will develop," Hodak says. "And yet, more than half of these companies are employed in maintaining equipment. They dilute their focus." Hodak’s hope is to lower the barrier to entry for basic lab research, making it possible for even the scrappiest biotech startups to compete against giant firms, doing basic medical research and eventually developing drugs for a fraction of the current cost.

10
YC-Backed Booktrope Rethinks Book Publishing

If you’re a writer, you’ve probably heard horror stories about the publishing industry — books that are rejected by publisher after publisher, books that sit in submission piles for years, books that are published but basically disappear without publisher support.

11
FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler: This Is How We Will Ensure Net Neutrality | WIRED

Using this authority, I am submitting to my colleagues the strongest open internet protections ever proposed by the FCC. These enforceable, bright-line rules will ban paid prioritization, and the blocking and throttling of lawful content and services. I propose to fully apply—for the first time ever—those bright-line rules to mobile broadband. My proposal assures the rights of internet users to go where they want, when they want, and the rights of innovators to introduce new products without asking anyone’s permission.

12
Tim Cook to deliver commencement address at George Washington University, receive honorary doctorate

The University of Breslau gave an honorary doctorate to�Johannes Brahms in 1879. The somewhat curmudgeonly Brahms wanted to just send a simple thank-you letter, but one of his pals convinced him that the magnitude of the honor required him to write a commemorative piece. Brahms ended up writing the Akademische Festouvert�re ("Academic Festival Overture") and conducted the inaugural performance at the university himself the following year. Brahms was something of a jokester and the piece turned out to be a well-knit pastiche of German university drinking songs (to the annoyance of some in the audience, and to the amusement of a few others), basically a nineteenth-century mashup. The composition has remained one of the most popular works in Brahms' oeuvre to this day. Even a fragment of the piece makes a brief, ironic appearance in Animal House.

13
Cyberattack Takes Down Lenovo Website

Lenovo came under criticism last week for preinstalling its consumer laptops with ad-serving software called Superfish that security researchers said made it easier for hackers to access encrypted Web data and even online passwords. The company said last Thursday it stopped shipping computers with the Superfish adware in January and said it wouldn’t preload the software on its products again.

14
Apple ordered to pay $532.9 million to an iTunes patent troll

Apple is appealing the ruling, and points out that Smartflash hasn't exactly been above-board in its behavior. It exists solely to extract patent royalties, and waited years to take action -- it even set up its only office across from the courthouse holding the trial, making it clear that lawsuits were expected from the start. It's hard to tell whether or not the appeal will succeed in reducing the payout (Apple wanted to limit damages to $4.5 million) or overturning the verdict. However, Apple isn't the only target in the crosshairs. Smartflash has also sued Google and Samsung, so it could cause a lot of grief for the tech industry as a whole.

15
New Final Fantasy 15 Trailer Takes You on Safari - IGN

There's a heap of recognisable Final Fantasy staples, including Chocobos, a Behemoth and even a Couerl, alongside eagles and frogs the likes of which we'd see in the real world. There's also an antelope with some seriously excessive horns. All-in-all, it's a good time.

16
Facebook Adds New Feature For Suicide Prevention

The new reporting feature is currently available for 50 percent of Facebook users in the U.S. and will roll out to the rest of the country in the next few months, a spokesperson for Facebook told The Huffington Post in a phone interview on Wednesday.

17
Google Merges Its European Divisions

At the event in Brussels, Brittin also announced that Google will train one million Europeans in digital skills by 2016, through a new digital training hub.

18
Disqus relaunches to turn your comments into a Reddit-like social network

Disqus , which makes a popular website plug-in for hosting comments at the end of articles you read on the internet, relaunched its homepage today as a full-fledged social network. Log in to your Disqus account, and you'll find a news feed with stories from the people, blogs, and websites you follow on the network. You'll also see the latest comments on your own site, if you have one, and recommendations for other commenters to follow. And for the first time, Disqus is creating standalone forums that are separate from article pages.

19
Frigid weather causes slush waves to come ashore in Nantucket

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 42 million unique visitors worldwide and 21 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

20
Vurb Is Mobile Search For Finding Things and People

Organizing friends to go out to the movies or dinner can be a pain; you jump between apps and websites as you try to figure out which restaurant to eat at, which movie to see, at what theatre, all the while trying to organize it over texts.

21
A Field Guide to the Internet Infrastructure That Hides in Plain Sight | WIRED

The field guide shows just that. It includes an illustrated taxonomy of manholes, including those of Time Warner Cable and Level 3 Communications, a fiber optic provider who signed a near half-billion dollar contract with the Department of Defense in 2012. It decodes the colorful symbols you’ll often find spray-painted on city streets, providing capsule blurbs on the companies they denote. It identifies other random bits of hardware, from the cameras deployed by the MTA to the “Distributed Antenna Systems” used to blanket the city’s urban canyons in cell coverage. And it includes a handy list of infrastructural landmarks, including 60 Hudson, the former Western Union headquarters, where New York City links up to the internet at large. The art deco “carrier hotel,” as they’re called, is currently home to upwards of 70 million feet of cable. (Below: an excellent short documentary on the site, created by Ben Mendelsohn and Alex Cholas-Wood.)

22
Lenovo victim of cyber-attack

Chinese computer maker Lenovo has become the victim of a cyber-attack following a warning by the US government about software called Superfish.

23
Galaxy S6 Edge and Galaxy S6 appear side-by-side in latest leak

We got a good look at what appears to be Samsung's  upcoming Galaxy S6 smartphone this morning. Now new images have leaked to show its sibling, the Galaxy S6 Edge, featuring a curved display similar to the one seen on Samsung's Galaxy Note Edge. Pictures shared  on xda-developers forum claim to show an S6 and the S6 Edge  side by side , corroborating the expectation that Samsung would be releasing two versions of its latest flagship phone.

24
Apple is Showing It's Still Serious about Rivaling Google Maps

Apple extends 3D Flyover support and strikes new US partnerships, showing it’s still serious about rivaling Google Maps

25
Net Neutrality Wins!

In reaction to that loss, the FCC regrouped and came up with the Title II proposal which would give it authority over ISPs. Today’s vote to enact that proposal is huge. But, as the earlier Verizon lawsuit showed, it’s not over yet.

26
If you haven't taken a selfie with a quokka, you haven't lived

When you are choosing between a wombat that can destroy you by sitting on you, a kangaroo that can box your lights out or a crocodile that will death roll you and then eat you, the quokka is a pretty good choice to get up close and personal with. So far there have been no reported quokka deaths.

27
Apple Plans ‘Special Event’ on March 9, Likely for Smartwatch

Apple  said it will hold a “special event” for March 9 that is likely to be a coming-out party for Apple Watch. Apple has said the watch will go on sale in April.

28
Lenovo website hijacked just days after Superfish scandal - CNET

Lenovo's security headaches continued Wednesday as the PC maker's website fell victim to a cyberattack, just days after the PC maker apologized for preloading software on some of its PCs that leaves them vulnerable to malware attacks.

29
Arrow: "Nanda Parbat" Review - IGN

Again, there wasn’t quite as much tension driving the episode at this point. Ra’s deciding that Malcolm, not Thea or Ollie, would be held to blame for Sara’s death pretty much solved everyone’s problems. It got Malcom out of everyone’s hair and ensured the League would finally leave Starling City alone. Sure, Ollie’s sense of honor and his desire not to allow Thea to damn herself required that he go rescue Malcolm. But compared to “The Climb,” where Ollie went to save his sister from imminent death, this journey wasn’t quite so dramatic. There wasn’t the same sense of certain doom hanging over his head. Diggle kept alluding to there being another purpose behind Ollie’s journey. And there was, ultimately, but the idea of Ollie wanting to face the man who beat him rang a little false. Despite what he said in their prison cell, he’s not that petty or egotistical a person.

30
Gmail Adds Burmese Language Support

Google has announced today that Gmail now supports Burmese across its interface, bringing the service’s language count to 74.

31
Mashable on Twitter

32
HDPE Upcycling stellar icosahedron lamp

Make a low cost lamp with everyday materials

33
Net neutrality passes FCC, will apply to mobile too

The FCC’s vote comes after a year of debate over net neutrality rules, with about 4 million public comments filed in the proceeding, with many of the comments calling on the agency to pass strong rules grounded in the telecom regulations in Title II of the Telecommunications Act. In early 2014, a U.S. appeals court overturned net neutrality rules the agency passed in 2010, saying the FCC pegged the rules to the wrong section of the Telecommunications Act.

34
You can now store 50,000 songs online with Google Play Music

The increased storage is a noticeable jump over what Apple offers with its iTunes Match service. There you get 25,000 track uploads but you have to pay $24.99 a year to get them. And you can’t get at those tunes from anything other than iTunes or an Apple TV, so Android device owners need not apply.

35
Why this man spent $18,000 for 100,000 shares of stock in a company that hasn't even launched yet

"Challenging Amazon is an incredible feat to try," Martin says. "100,000 stock options in a company trying to do that is just really exciting to me."

36
7 SEO Strategies You Can't be Without in 2015

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) sounds a bit like rocket science. With the right combo of this widget and that module, add in time, subtract theory and maybe the equation will produce a solution better than the last.

37
Wattpad Offers A Dedicated Sexy Stories App To Ride The ’50 Shades’ Wave

After Dark was actually a side project created in the experimental Wattpad Labs portion of the company where staff are encouraged to pick at projects not included in the general thrust of day-to-day business. It was a project born of the company’s Hack Friday, which is a monthly internal hackathon, and built over just two short weeks before being launched quietly earlier this month. It has racked up over 8,000 downloads, and Wattpad says it’s benefitting from a spike in interest in this kind of fiction following the release of 50 Shades of Grey in theaters.

38
LG’s New Smartwatch Will Support LTE But Won’t Run Android Wear

LG’s decision to go beyond the Google platform appears to have been made to differentiate its smartwatch from the existing competition. The company boasts that the LG Watch Urbane LTE will be the first smartwatch to support 4G cellular connections — the aim is to be more than just a companion/notification device. That’s a description that, to this point, applies to almost all smartwatches on the market.

39
The Vergecast, live today at 4:30PM ET!

As usual, we'll be live at 4:30PM ET / 1:30PM PT / 9:30PM GMT via the live stream embed above. And if you miss the live show, you can always watch the replay (using the embed above) or download the audio version on iTunes. And speaking of iTunes, be sure to  rate us five stars if you enjoyed the show. We'll do our best to make sure you do.

40
A Look Back at the Long Road to Net Neutrality

February 2015: Democratic Chairman Tom Wheeler introduces the current net neutrality proposal. Internet service companies such as AT&T and Comcast would be banned from offering paid prioritization to content providers such as Amazon for faster access. But the proposal would also allow Internet service companies to prevent other companies from using their wires to connect homes to the Internet.

41
Delta's in-flight WiFi is about to get a whole lot faster

If you've flown Delta recently (or most domestic airlines) and tried to use the onboard Gogo WiFi, you know that it's often a crapshoot. A combination of where you're flying over and the number of passengers attempting to use it leads to either a decent connection (yay!), one that's slow as a snail (ugh), or none at all ($#!%). Look, we need to remember that sending tweets at 35,000 feet is basically magic . But being able to stream even a low-res YouTube clip would really make flying a happier experience.

42
On being wrong

Most of us will do anything to avoid being wrong. But what if we're wrong about that? "Wrongologist" Kathryn Schulz makes a compelling case for not just admitting but embracing our fallibility.

43
Why Mornings Don’t Make You Moral - The New Yorker

Our sleep patterns are governed by circadian rhythms, our bodies’ response to changes in light and dark in a typical day. The rhythms are slightly different for every person, which is why our energy levels ebb and flow in ways that are unique to us. This internal clock determines what is called our chronotype—whether we are morning people, night people, or somewhere in between. Chronotypes are relatively stable, though they have been known to shift with age. Children and older adults generally prefer mornings; adolescents and young adults prefer evenings. Figuring out where you fall is simple: spend a few weeks going to bed when you feel tired and waking up without an alarm clock. A quicker alternative is the Horne-Ostberg questionnaire, which presents various scenarios—a difficult exam, twice-weekly exercise with a friend—and determines your chronotype on the basis of what time of day you’d feel most up to confronting them.

44
BEHOLD: '50 Fox News Lies In 6 Seconds'

Lately, neither party is pulling any punches in its coverage of the other. Fox News hosts have called "The Daily Show" a clear case of "selective editing" with "no foothold in the facts," while Stewart has said that "even watching [Fox News] is killing me." But Stewart has upped the ante by challenging Fox News to provide any proof that his show has ever lied.

45
Channel 9: Videos about the people building Microsoft Products and Services

Larry Larsen, Eric Havir and Jamey Tisdale take a tour of the newly renovated Building 20. This building is the home of the Channel 9 studio and it is now used to host designers, partners and developers to run workshops, executive engagements and hackathons. In this video, we...

46
Let's save the last pristine continent

2041 will be a pivotal year for our planet. That year will mark the end of a 50-year agreement to keep Antarctica, the Earth’s last pristine continent, free of exploitation. Explorer Robert Swan — the first person to walk both the North and South Poles — is on a mission to ensure that we extend that treaty. With passion and vigor, he pleads with us to choose the preservation of the Antarctic for our own survival.

47
How to Use Facebook Video Cards for Business |

I love the idea of making use of this feature in a different way, but the only problem is it means you need to becoming Facebook friends with your clients or staff. You mention about the debate for this, but as far as I’m concerned if there is any debate at all it’s not something I would do. If there’s a chance a client doesn’t feel good about it then I don’t feel good about it.

48
Vintage X-rays reveal the hidden effects of corsets - CNET

It was this that O'Followell used to illustrate the effects of tight lacing on the ribcage, in a series of striking images included in a paper entitled Le Corset. In it, he argued that the corset not only affected a woman's physical health, but also her behaviour. He cites novelist Arabella Kenealy, who in 1904 penned an article about the ill effects of the corset -- including an account of a strange and possibly nonexistent experiment involving putting corsets on monkeys -- noting that she blamed the corset for "bad language."

49
Creative problem-solving in the face of extreme limits

Navi Radjou has spent years studying "jugaad," also known as frugal innovation. Pioneered by entrepreneurs in emerging markets who figured out how to get spectacular value from limited resources, the practice has now caught on globally. Peppering his talk with a wealth of examples of human ingenuity at work, Radjou also shares three principles for how we can all do more with less.

50
Math class needs a makeover

Today's math curriculum is teaching students to expect — and excel at — paint-by-numbers classwork, robbing kids of a skill more important than solving problems: formulating them. In his talk, Dan Meyer shows classroom-tested math exercises that prompt students to stop and think. (Filmed at TEDxNYED.)

51 You don't need an app for that
52 The girl who gets gifts from birds
53 Redirecting
54 Internet. Internet slang meets American Sign Language
55 'Afghan Girl' from famous NatGeo cover resurfaces at center of Pakistan controversy
56 Why I’m Saying Goodbye to Apple, Google and Microsoft
57 YouTube: 1 Billion Viewers, No Profit
58 Venmo Is Trendy, Easy to Use, and Growing Fast. But Are Its Mobile Payments Safe?
59 We Need Your Disrupt NY Battlefield Submissions Right Now!
60 The TheTechNewsBlog Daily
61 Paris surpasses New York as most popular city on Airbnb
62 How A Trillion-Dollar Market Remains Hidden In Plain Sight
63 Photographer puts Marvel superheroes in not-so-super situations
64 Google Launches Android for Work
65 The 100 Best iPad Apps of 2015
66 The Web at 25
67 In 2013, measles killed more kids than car accidents or AIDS
68 Everything I Own Fits in One Bag. Here's How (and Why)
69 Circa Breaks Free From Mobile, Brings Its Personalized News Digest To The Web
70 Hidden music rituals around the world
71 The Running Novelist - The New Yorker
72 Tales of ice-bound wonderlands
73 https://www.spoonrocket.com/?seattle
74 Aereo's sad bankruptcy auction brings in less than $2 million
75 Goals Suck: Why Building Habits and Systems Makes Sense
76 7 Ways to Cultivate Your Daily Blogging Practice
77 A forensic anthropologist who brings closure for the "disappeared"
78 Parents tattoo legs to match daughter's birthmark and make her feel less alone
79 A Vacant Lot In Wyoming Will Become One Of The World's First Vertical Farms
80 The FCC's Vote to Protect Net Neutrality Is a Huge Win for the Internet | WIRED
81 The loves and lies of fireflies
82 The girl who gets gifts from birds
83 Heartwarming Photos Spotlight Therapy Llamas Spreading Smiles
84 Sigourney Weaver's Ripley return will pick up after 'Aliens', ignoring other sequels - CNET
85 Vurb Is Crazy Enough To Fight Google
86 PewResearch Internet on Twitter
87 FCC Passes Strongest Net Neutrality Rules In America's History
88 After your final status update
89 FedEx And UPS Refuse to Ship a Digital Mill That Can Make Untraceable Guns | WIRED
90 11 Google apps you probably didn't know existed
91 How to share music on Pinterest
92 Did you know?
93 Ellen Pao Trial Witnesses Expose Kleiner Perkins' Thorny Gender Politics | WIRED