Top Videos
Watch R.E.M's ex-bassist rap about the death of newspapers

Newspapers are dying, and ex-R.E.M. bassist Mike Mills is upset about it. Mills appears as part of an ensemble cast to lament the death of the medium in a song titled "Stop The Presses," in which...

New interactive map of Milky Way lets you see the light (and dust) - CNET

Information from the Planck space telescope helped create a stunning new map. It's also shedding light on dark matter and the origins of the universe.

Matchstick streaming stick delays shipping to get Netflix and faster chips

Matchstick’s Kickstarter backers will have to wait a bit longer to get the Firefox OS-based streaming stick: Matchstick is delaying shipments until August, the company announced Friday. Matchstick wants to use that time to put digital rights management (DRM) in place — a key requirement to get premium video apps like Netflix — and also…

'Ultima Underworld' could resurface with your help

Before The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim there was Ultima Underworld, and with your help, a sequel to the highly influential role-playing game could happen. It

NBC's Brian Williams isn't the only one having trouble remembering Iraq

NBC's Brian Williams is not the only one have trouble recalling the details of that fateful 2003 helicopter mission in Iraq.

'Fifty Shades of Grey' Lego trailer is better than the real thing

Everything is better as Lego, particularly the trailer for the controversial 50 Shades of Grey.

Do you even need a tablet?

The Mashable tech team will discuss the best tablets available in a live MashTalk Hangout on Air on Feb. 6 at 2 p.m. ET.

Community rallies to help injured Girl Scout meet her cookie goals

A web page in Sinai Miller's honor has been set up to ensure that she meets her Girl Scout cookie goals for the season after she was shot.

The Harnisch Foundation | Welcome to theHF

Our mission is to create a more fair and equitable world by investing in gender and racial diversity.

2-year-old sings her ABCs in the most metal way possible [VIDEO]

This angry little kid prefers her children's music with extra distortion.

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Top News
1
HTC reports slim profit for third consecutive quarter

HTC is looking beyond smartphones to grow its business as the company reports  slim profit margins in its latest quarterly earnings. The Taiwanese firm announced profits of $15.9 million from revenues of $1.5 billion in the quarter ending December 31st, 2014, with CEO Peter Chou describing it as a "solid platform" on which to continue building a new range of "mobile lifestyle" products. So far, this strategy has produced only the Re camera —  a well-designed, but underperforming action cam — but HTC is promising much more, including "a line of connected health and fitness-related devices" made in  collaboration with Under Armour .

2
Who's Your IT Hero? - InformationWeek

I have my personal IT heroes. A lot of us, if we're lucky, have at least one of these special pros as a colleague. For me, there's Jerry Horn, who combines app and system expertise with a genuine understanding of what's vital to us as journalists. So, he gets why I need his advice so quickly when we’re on deadline -- and why I might not be a pillar of patience or courtesy when calling for help.

3
Feds can't indefinitely gag Yahoo about subpoena, judge rules

U.S. Magistrate Judge Paul Grewal in San Jose, California on Thursday wrote that the government's request would prohibit Yahoo from disclosing the subpoena, even years after the grand jury concluded its probe. The court order does not disclose the target of the federal investigation.

4
The Walking Dead: The Coolest Weapons - IGN

The Walking Dead returns to AMC this Sunday, February 8th, to finish out the back half of Season 5. And with Rick and the rest of the survivors reeling from their recent loss and back on the open road, they're going to need their trusty weapons more than ever!

5
Apple Abduction

He likely won’t be the last Apple executive poached by Tesla. The company has hired at least 150 former Apple employees, more than from any other company, even carmakers. The former Apple staffers work in many areas of the 6,000-employee automaker, including engineering and law. “From a design philosophy, [Apple] is relatively closely aligned,” says Musk, Tesla’s co-founder and chief executive officer. Apple declined to comment for this story.

6
A Wireless Sensor That Locks Your Mac When You Walk Away | WIRED

The new Sesame 2 key fob is a dead-simple security solution for your Mac that’s exactly the right kind of boring. It automatically locks your computer when you walk away from it. Also, not as boring, it allows for some customizable actions including two-factor authentication.

7
London's Newest Bike Lanes Could Be Underground In Abandoned Tube Tunnels

"We could repurpose the larger spaces at the platform level and actually put in a whole series of things down there, whether it be routes for pedestrians and cyclists, click-and-collect retail, or places for buskers. They would be like relief points from the rest of the city."

8
Privacy groups want investigation of big data acquisitions

The four privacy groups—the Center for Digital Democracy [CDD], U.S. PIRG, Consumer Watchdog, and Public Citizen—raised particular concerns about Oracle’s agreement, announced in December, to acquire data broker Datalogix. The transaction gave Oracle, in its words, access to the “the world’s most valuable data cloud” for digital marketing and for connecting consumers’ various identities across “all devices, screens and channels.”

9
Inside the pages of a 1981 Radio Shack catalog

Once upon a time, Radio Shack was saved from bankruptcy — in the 1960s. The British Tandy corporation, at that time a leather goods retailer, bought the company in a resulting merger called Tandy Radio Shack & Leather.

10
These startups and VCs just won the Crunchies

This evening VentureBeat and TechCrunch cohosted the Crunchies , an annual award show that ranks the biggest movers and shakers in the technology industry.

11
Katy Perry’s lawyers demand takedown of 3D printable Left Shark

While the nation identifies with the Super Bowl’s insta-star Left Shark, Katy Perry’s lawyers are apparently more the Right Shark type. They issued a cease and desist letter (see below) to on-demand 3D printing service Shapeways on Tuesday, demanding a 3D model depicting Left Shark be taken down.

12
Sheryl Sandberg's bold plan to get more women to code

There are currently Circles at over 330 college campuses, including Harvard, NYU, Stanford and the University of Tennessee. Sandberg and LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner plan on doing livestream sessions with students; Facebook and LinkedIn will develop programming and lend staffers' time to help identify women students to run Circles. The Anita Borg Institute, which puts on the annual Grace Hopper Celebration for Women in Computing, will offer educational materials and mentorship from its impressive rolodex, which includes Google X's Head of Display Vision Mary Lou Jepsen, famed computer scientist Maria Klawe and computing pioneer Frances E. Allen.

13
This 9-year-old makes $1 million a year on YouTube opening toys

This 9-year-old makes $1 million a year opening toys

14
An analysis of San Francisco's startups shows where the 'real' Silicon Valley is

There’s a new map of entrepreneurial hotspots in California, and it’s here to show you where the "real" Silicon Valley is. By coding startup characteristics and looking out companies' success six years down the line, researchers at MIT say that they were able to map out exactly which areas of California have the highest entrepreneurial quality, as well as identify which characteristics tend to typify companies that "make it big."

15
golang/go

Go is a systems programming language intended to be a general-purpose systems language, like C++. These are some notes on Go for experienced C++ programmers. This document discusses the differences between Go and C++, and says little to nothing about the similarities.

16
LinkedIn Beats In Q4 With $643M In Revenue, EPS Of $0.61

LinkedIn today reported the results of its fourth financial quarter of 2014. The company handily beat Wall Street’s expectations with its revenue of $643, up 44% from the year-ago quarter, for non-GAAP earnings per share of $0.61. Wall Street expected earnings per share around $0.53 and revenue of just under $617 million.

17
White House chooses VMware’s Tony Scott to be next U.S. CIO

VMware’s Tony Scott has been chosen to become the next U.S. chief information officer, according to a White House announcement on Thursday. Scott will follow in the footsteps of previous U.S. CIOs Vivek Kundra and Steve VanRoekel and be tasked with spearheading the White House’s Smarter IT Delivery Agenda and looking over the nation’s federal IT budget. Scott is currently VMware’s CIO and was previously the CIO of Microsoft for a little over five years. The White House hasn’t had an official CIO since VanRoekel left the post to return to the US Agency for International Development where he advised the government on the Ebola outbreak.

18
Cynthia Breazeal: Social robotics pioneer. MIT lab leader. Proud mom.

Though she planned on becoming a doctor, her parents convinced her to pursue a degree in electrical and computer engineering at UC Santa Barbara. It so happened that around the time she attended, the school had started a robotics lab. Her fascination with Star Wars stayed with her through college, so she began taking more robotics classes. Then she read an article about planetary rovers and decided she might want to be an astronaut. So, Breazeal applied to graduate schools to get a doctorate in space robotics. She decided on MIT, where she would earn her ScD and MS degrees in electrical engineering and computer science. When she visited the lab for the first time, she was amazed.

19
Xiaomi's MIUI 6 OS Adds Style and Function To Android

I like how MIUI is different enough to feel novel, yet familiar enough for any smartphone user to dive into. As with earlier versions of the OS, you can tap and hold the menu hardware button on the home screen and shake the device to neatly arrange your icons. MIUI 6 also lets you move and delete multiple apps at once, which works very well and makes a stronger case for doing away with the app drawer.

20
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella makes a big impression in just a year

Satya Nadella’s  appointment as Microsoft CEO a year ago was surprising. A protracted search for Steve Ballmer’s successor had many expecting the nod to go to an outsider to steer Microsoft into the future, not the then-unknown 22-year Microsoft veteran. Microsoft even attempted to massage any concerns by strategically announcing Bill Gates was " substantially increasing " his time at the company. It’s still not clear whether Gates is really dedicating up to 30 percent of his time at Microsoft. Nevertheless, Nadella created a mission statement to drive Microsoft forward with a mobile and cloud focus, and so far he seems to be steering the software giant in the right direction.

21
Google is offering $6 in Play Store credit to all Chromecast owners

As part of their Valentine’s Day celebration, Google is giving out $6 in Google Play credit for free to all Chromecast owners. The credit can be used for anything in the Play Store including apps, games, movies, books, music and more. If you own a Chromecast, the instructions are simple: head to the Chromecast link below, ensure that you’re connected to the same network as your Chromecast, verify the correct device, and click  redeem . And that’s it!

22
New York City Subways Are Covered in Microscopic Pizza

“When you think about it, the subway is a giant laboratory where we all experience the world,” said Chris Mason, a genomics researcher from Weill Cornell Medical School in New York City. On a typical weekday, more than 5.5 million people pass through turnstiles and enter the underground behemoth that is the New York City subway system. Clinging to them are microscopic stowaways from the surface world. The genetic echoes they leave behind become a part of the subway ecosystem.

23
​The Worst Lies You've Been Told About the Singularity | Empeopled

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24
Up close with Canon's impressive new cameras

Canon announced a lot of new cameras today, but two in particular stand out — the 50-megapixel EOS 5DS is now the highest-resolution full-frame DSLR in the world, and the EOS M3 represents the camera giant’s most serious take yet on the mirrorless category. While the camera industry is going through a period of transition, Canon remains a dominant force; it sells more high-end cameras than anyone. I went along to the Tokyo launch event to see how its latest are shaping up.

25
GoPro's Q4 earnings go big thanks to Hero 4 sales

GoPro just posted the results of its holiday quarter, which included a full three months of sales of its latest camera lineup. The company reported earnings of 99 cents a share on revenue of $633.9 million, far above both what it forecast in October and what investors were expecting, thanks to strong sales of its latest cameras.

26
TurboTax Temporarily Halts E-Filing In All States Amid Fraud Concerns

Very interesting, I received a notice from the IRS just the other day, saying they were reviewing my 2014 tax return, but if I did not file a return, then I was likely a victim of a fraudulent tax return being filed using my social security number. I called the IRS phone number provided, and sure enough, a tax form had already been filed for 2014 using my SSN. I did not file this return. I filled out the required form 14093 reporting this to the IRS, plus they put a stop on any refunds requested by the fraudulent tax form. I also had to file a report with the Federal Trade Commission, and sign up for identity theft protection, and alert my banks requesting they do not approve any request for loans. I have used E-file with Turbotax for the past 5 or more years, so it might be wrapped up in this issue posted by Intuit. I have a call in to them right now, on hold waiting.

27
Cablevision's WiFi-only unlimited mobile phone service is live

The all-WiFi phone service Cablevision announced in January is now available. Unlike the usual mobile carrier, the Freewheel phone (currently a $100 second generation Moto G ) only operates on WiFi -- to keep costs down it doesn't look for 3G, LTE or any other kind of signal. Of course, if you're consistently in the range of wireless hotspots then that's not a problem, and it's pre-programmed to log in to any of 1.1 million Optimum hotspots in the New York area or "Cable WiFi" hotspots elsewhere. As promised, it's $10 per month for customers with Cablevision's internet service or $30 without, all to get unlimited calling, data and text messaging with no annual contract.

28 U.S. court orders Symantec to pay $17 million for patent infringement

The verdict is a blow to Mountain View, Calif.-based Symantec. It also confirmed the validity of the patents and strengthens Intellectual Ventures' track record in court. The multibillion-dollar company has become one of the biggest patent owners in the world and only recently began suing companies in addition to its longtime strategy of licensing its wide array of patents.

29
The World’s Email Encryption Software Relies on One Guy, Who is Going Broke

The campaign gave Koch, who has an 8-year-old daughter and a wife who isn't working, some breathing room. But when I asked him what he will do when the current batch of money runs out, he shrugged and said he prefers not to think about it. "I'm very glad that there is money for the next three months," Koch said. "Really I am better at programming than this business stuff."

30
How Micro-Learning Made its Way on The Education Market

Just a few years after massive Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) disrupted the field of education by offering university-level education programs to everyone for free, they’re already in need of re-disruption. One of the ways to do so is to make courses shorter and easier to digest. That’s where quite a few startups have found their niches and even started making money, solving the monetization problem some MOOCs appear to have.

31
Productivity Advice I Learned From People Smarter Than Me

Like all people, I’d like to think I am a productive person. If I am, however, it’s because I’ve been ruthlessly efficient at one thing: stealing secrets and methods from people a lot smarter than me.

32
Ubuntu phone has alternative to apps

"The Ubuntu fan base will clamour to buy the phone just because they will be curious to see what it is, how it works and how they can develop for it - they'll want to be one of the few that have it," said Chris Green, from Davies Murphy Group Europe.

33
Drone Maker DJI Asks Users to Roll Back Safety Update

DJI Phantom 2, Phantom 2 Vision and Phantom 2 Vision + owners are being urged to roll back their drone firmware from version 3.10 to version 3.08 to avoid issues while operating their drones.

34
LinkedIn Connects UK Professionals With UK Charities

LinkedIn’s usually about finding your next paid gig but it’s just unveiled a new set of features to connect professionals who want to volunteer with UK charities that need their help.

35
Samsung aims for variety with Galaxy S6, leaked photo suggests - CNET

Images leaked to CNET Korea allegedly show off the highly anticipated Samsung Galaxy S6, including an Edge-style screen variant of the smartphone.

36
Facebook can now stalk you even when you're not on Facebook

The new policy says Facebook can track everything you do online - even on apps and websites that have nothing to do with Facebook - using tools that other sites can choose to implement.

37
How to escape education's death valley

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish — and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

38
Cheap Smartphone Dongle Diagnoses HIV And Syphilis In 15 Minutes | IFLScience

Developed by researchers at Columbia Engineering , the low-cost dongle can simultaneously detect two markers from syphilis, and one from HIV, in just 15 minutes. What’s more, it only requires a finger prick of blood, and runs on power drawn from the smartphone, eliminating the need for extra batteries.

39
How to trust intelligently

We trust doctors who take the trouble to ask and answer questions with care, and show that they understand what the problem is and that they can explain the limits of available treatments. We trust journalists who take trouble to provide evidence and sources for their claims, and who publish prompt corrections if they get things wrong. We trust businesses that make accurate claims about their products, and offer usable complaints procedures when something goes wrong. We trust retailers that take unwanted purchases back, no questions asked. We trust teachers who explain what they are doing, listen to comments from parents and pupils, and provide intelligible feedback to them. We trust politicians who speak straightforwardly, don’t promise what they can’t deliver, explain their policies and their difficulties with reasonable caution, and visibly try to deliver what they promise. We trust retail banks that reliably look after our savings, and don’t short-change customers by rewarding loyalty with unattractive interest rates.

40
When people of Muslim heritage challenge fundamentalism

Karima Bennoune shares four powerful stories of real people fighting against fundamentalism in their own communities — refusing to allow the faith they love to become a tool for crime, attacks and murder. These personal stories humanize one of the most overlooked human-rights struggles in the world.

41
TED Talks to get you through your quarter-life crisis

Yes, you're an adult now. But there's no need to panic! Take a deep breath and survive twenty-something burnout with the help of these talks.

42
Our buggy moral code

Behavioral economist Dan Ariely studies the bugs in our moral code: the hidden reasons we think it's OK to cheat or steal (sometimes). Clever studies help make his point that we're predictably irrational — and can be influenced in ways we can't grasp.

43
I'm an Anti-Braker

Guys, I wanted to let you know about a personal decision I recently made. I don’t really feel like discussing it, but I want to put my position out there. Please be respectful. This is a really long post, but please read the whole thing.

44
Let's raise kids to be entrepreneurs

Bored in school, failing classes, at odds with peers: This child might be an entrepreneur, says Cameron Herold. In his talk, he makes the case for parenting and education that helps would-be entrepreneurs flourish — as kids and as adults.

45
BMW i8: Reviewing The Car Of Tomorrow

The i8 is BMW’s latest supercar, able to go 0 to 60 in about 4.4 seconds with its hybrid electric/gas powertrain. The i8 looks like a Hot Wheels car, handles like a supercar and is as expensive as a high-end Porsche. With a starting price of $135,000, this isn’t the car for everyone. It’s actually a gateway into BMW’s other hybrid, the cute and cheap BMW i3, a shorter, sporty runaround that BMW is touting as their answer to crunchy hybrids from Honda, Nissan, and Chevy.

46
How Star Trek will finally come true

Most of us long to make a dent in the universe, to leave a world that’s different and better from the one we were born into. Now, increasingly, we can. And this shows us something that will blow our mind in 30 years: There is a new way for you, for many of us, to make a real dent, to bring the unique thing only we have to offer to bear on a situation to improve it. We all have something to offer — and as the next decades go by, we’ll all figure out how to apply it in a meaningful way.

47
What humans can learn from semi-intelligent slime

Inspired by biological design and self-organizing systems, artist Heather Barnett co-creates with physarum polycephalum, a eukaryotic microorganism that lives in cool, moist areas. What can people learn from the semi-intelligent slime mold? Watch this talk to find out.

48
Can worker cooperatives alleviate income inequality? | Al Jazeera America

One year into their company’s existence, Roca Mia’s workers aren’t getting rich, but worker-owner Manuel Escobar says he’s seen an improvement over what he was making as an employee, and the business is covering its costs. Because the Rockaway co-ops were seeded with $100,000 that had been donated to Occupy Sandy, the workers didn’t have to put up their own money to get started, but because it is their business, they feel deeply invested in its success. Because existing cooperatives range in industry from child care to computer programming, massage therapy to translation, and in size from the two employees at La Mies to more than 2,000 at Cooperative Home Care Associates, a collectively run home-health-care provider, it’s hard to estimate what the potential for Roca Mia and La Mies might be, but to Henry Lezama, the goal is to keep growing, to bring more people into the cooperative.

49 10 myths about psychology: Debunked

How much of what you think about your brain is actually wrong? In this whistlestop tour of dis-proved science, Ben Ambridge walks through 10 popular ideas about psychology that have been proven wrong — and uncovers a few surprising truths about how our brains really work.

50
The 100 Best iPhone Apps of 2015

If you have an iPhone 6 Plus or iPhone 6 , you get to experience a few perks that people with older iPhone models don't have. One is a bigger screen and many apps that take advantage of it. Another is the Touch ID fingerprint scanner (iPhone 5S owners get this benefit, too), which can add a layer of protection to apps that contain sensitive data, like the personal finance app Mint. You can also use Touch ID with one of our favorite password managers, LastPass, to log you into all your other accounts without having to type passwords.

51 What's wrong with what we eat
52 The Billionaires at Burning Man
53 The TheTechNewsBlog Daily
54 Who Was Gen. Tso, and Why Does He Have His Own Chicken? A Great New Doc Explains.
55 The Best Free Stock Image Resources on the Web
56 What the gay rights movement learned from the civil rights movement
57 Home | Newsletters | MIT Technology Review
58 Insights on HIV, in stunning data visuals
59 Counterintuitive career advice
60 Oreo's next hot flavor is s'mores
61 Giving Tea The Blue Bottle Treatment
62 Raspberry Pi 2 is 6 times faster than Pi 1, supports Windows 10
63 10 ways the world could end
64 The One Word That's Undermining Everything Else You Say
65 6 TED Talks on how language changes over time
66 Q&A With the World’s “Coolest” Wildlife Photographer
67 At 92, the man who brought you the lithium-ion battery is still having creative breakthroughs
68 How I Felt After 70 Days of Lying in Bed for Science | VICE | United States
69 Marc Benioff Wins The 2014 Crunchie For CEO Of The Year
70 Chris Pratt makes good on bet to visit kids with cancer as Star-Lord
71 Why are we so obsessed with talking animals? – Stassa Edwards – Aeon
72 Drone Maker DJI Rolls Back Buggy Update That Restricted D.C. Flights Following White House Crash
73 Palantir Buys Fancy That To Add Retail, Shopping Data To Its Analytics Platform
74 Surprise! People don't like Keurig's DRM-protected coffeemakers
75 Investigative Journalists and Digital Security
76 4 Things You Probably Know About Poverty That Bill and Melinda Gates Don’t
77 Time out: Baseball team will wear 'Saved by the Bell' jerseys
78 This journalist used ALL CAPS for an entire week.
79 Barber will give your misbehaving kids an old-man haircut free of charge
80 Robot Writing Moves from Journalism to Wall Street | MIT Technology Review
81 Bye Bye, iPhoto: Apple Reboots With Photos for Mac
82 7 Key Habits For Building Better Relationships
83 U.K. Court Says NSA-GCHQ Data-Sharing Was Illegal
84 HelloFresh Raises $126 Million In Series E From Rocket Internet
85 Google Faces Fight In Europe On Search Delisting
86 We Tracked Down the Guy with the Super Bowl Shark Tattoo
87 UK government asks: How's our hacking?
88 This is Your Brain on Twitter
89 Couchsurfing.com is under fire after an Italian cop allegedly used the site to rape tourists