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Seven-year-old gets 3D-printed Iron Man prosthetic from Robert Downey Jr.

Everyone knows that some superheroes are made, not born. You don't need to be from another planet or get bitten by anything radioactive to become one — you just need the right gear. In this video...

When peeing in public in this German city, beware walls that pee back

Special water-repellent paint give public urinators a rude shock.

How Valve's secret meeting got devs on board with Steam VR

Alex Schwartz expected robes. His development studio, Owlchemy Labs, received a cryptic email from Valve, one of the largest and most mysterious companie

This Mean Tweets Video Won't Make You Laugh Like The Others

Watching celebrities read mean tweets results in a few good laughs and millions of YouTube hits. Watching kids read them isn't so funny. Modeled after Jimmy Kimmel’s “Mean Tweets” series, a video from the Canadian Safe School Net...

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Top News
1
The Apple Watch Edition could see a mark-up of nearly 500 percent

However, there may actually be some reasons why that’s too low of an estimate, as the original report cites Forbes , when it states that Apple might be using a lower amount of gold in the Watch Edition, which would inevitably make the mark-up even higher as it would mean less money Apple is putting out in gold for the Edition. If that is the case, it would mean that Apple could be seeing a mark-up of 500 percent.

2
Download iOS 8.2 for iPhone, iPad or iPod touch

Apple has also published a new knowledge base document, which provides the security content of iOS 8.2. Apple has credited “TaiG Jailbreak Team” for discovering the security flaw in “MobileStorageMounter”. So it looks like Apple has made it even more difficult to jailbreak iOS 8.2. Check our post for more details about the security content of iOS 8.2.

3
Apple Watch Release Date, News, Price and Specs - CNET

Unlike the last time I saw Apple Watch, this time I could actually try its features myself. On my wrist, like before, the watch felt good: not too heavy, sleek, and a comfy band fit. You interact via tapping, swiping, and using the two side buttons: one's a sleek small button, the other's the Digital Crown, which is a button plus a scrolling wheel. Tapping activates the display, while swiping up brings Glances, which are like mini-apps showing everything from weather to stock info to where your Uber car is. Like Google's Android Wear cards, these can be tapped to launch the full app. Click on an Instagram photo, and you get a mini Instagram app. Double clicking the smaller second button brings up Apple Pay, which works like the version on the iPhone minus the TouchID sensor. Sometimes it was hard to figure out whether to click the crown or bottom button, or whether to swipe or tap. But the interface in the demo room generally ran smooth. One of the Apple Watch's "glances." James Martin/CNET Bringing up your "friend wheel" for communication is the most clever touch: if this watch can make instant chat easy, it'll leapfrog other smartwatches out there.

4
Swatch co-inventor says an "Ice Age" is coming towards the Swiss watch industry due to the Apple Watch

In an interview with Bloomberg , Mock said that any company that primarily sells watches between the 500-1000 francs (~$500-$1000) price range is in danger due to the Apple Watch. He also said that the watch industry in Switzerland is underestimating the threat from the Apple Watch, and that they do not see the “Ice Age coming toward us.”

5
Apple Watch Companion iPhone app walkthrough: Pairing with Apple Watch, Installing Apple Watch apps and more

According to the iOS 8.2 release notes, it also includes a new Activity app for viewing fitness data and achievements from Apple Watch, which is installed when the Apple Watch is paired with your iPhone.

6
Project Titan, SixtyEight & SG5: Inside Apple's top-secret electric car project

Although not much is revealed here because it's near impossible to prove the claims made and conclusions drawn it is interesting nevertheless. If it's all true I'd say Apple are kicking themselves right now and the person who put that note on the door is receiving a swift talking to. Also: don't assume because Ive is a fan of old Fiats that Apple car would look anything like them. I think what Ive is more interested in than the Fiats themselves are timeless designs. That's what they'd try to do with an Apple car is build a design that could be tweaked for decades to come without the need to start over. Designs that come to mind are Porsche 911 and Fiat 500 etc. I'd also add many more cars to that list too like the original (though now ruined) VW Golf design. And the Homer ;-)

7
Twitter Starts Breaking Meerkat Features By Limiting Social Graph Access

So what’s that mean? Until now, new Meerkat users could login to the service with their Twitter account, and bam — you’d automatically be following anyone on Meerkat who you already follow on Twitter, and they’d be following you back. It let Meerkat seem like a very, very natural extension of Twitter.

8
Next iPhone Might Understand Different Types Of Touch

The next iPhone is expected later this year, according to the Journal's sources. The addition of Force Touch would allow the new handset to recognize two different types of taps from your fingers -- which the Journal said could revolutionize the way apps work, giving the example of a piano app that distinguishes between light and heavy presses.

9
DathBanners: Jailbreak tweak brings life to Notification banners

As an example, if you receive a text message from the Messages app, the notification banner will be colored green. On the other hand, if the notification belongs to the Twitter app, the banner background will change to blue color. It’s a great way of bringing life to your notification banners and make it look more dynamic. For app icons that feature a combination of different colors, the end result won’t look so good.

10
Blackberry launches new secure tablet

"Working alongside IBM and Samsung, we have added the last link in the chain of the Federal Security Network. Subject to certification of the SecuTABLET, German government agencies will have a new way to access BlackBerry’s most secure and complete communications network in the world,” Quelle said.

11
For the first time, the world economy grows while carbon emissions don't

Last year, global carbon dioxide emissions reached 32.3 billion metric tons — an amount equal to 2013's levels. During the 40 years the IEA has been collecting data, there have only been three other periods of time when atmospheric CO2 levels did not rise: in the early 1980s, 1992, and 2009. However, these years were also associated with global economic instability, and in 2014, the global economy grew by three percent,  according to the IEA .

12
New Windows 10 preview leaks as Microsoft struggles to deliver official test version

A new version of the Windows 10 technical preview leaked onto the internet today, days after Microsoft detailed a delay in delivering a fresh update to its preview program. The new build, numbered 10036, has been made available unofficially on torrent file sharing sites, and includes a number of UI improvements and some feature changes. The Start Menu is now transparent, and Microsoft is testing a new UI for Wi-Fi connectivity, alongside some improvements to the new task view virtual desktop feature that allows Windows 10 users to drag and drop apps between desktops.

13
It turns out Apple invented USB-C

One fact that has been overlooked in all this by US based netizens, is that the EU has mandated common USB connectors for all phone handsets. Yes when you look at the global picture, it seems like the tail wagging the dog, and personally I find government interference in standards like this highly objectionable, but still governments are governments and cannot simply be ignored. Not if you want to sell goods in the region in question. This would have left Apple with an uncomfortable set of options. A) Abandon lightening and use an inferior micro USB solution on all iPhones (which would clearly be unacceptable to Apple). B) Create EU only versions of the iPhone, using an inferior USB port on just on the iPhone (still unacceptable and goes against Apple’s “one iPhone” ethos) C) Make the best of an inconvenient regulation and input into the standards process to ensure the connector is a worthy one for use in an iPhone. I suspect this development is a result of going for option C.

14
http://www.wired.com/2015/03/plan-build-skyscraper-doesnt-cast-shadow/?mbid=social_twitter

About 250 skyscrapers are slated to redraw London’s skyline in the near future—each with its own dark imprint on the streets below. So architects at the firm NBBJ in London decided to see if they could come up with an entirely shadowless building. They used computer modeling to design a pair of buildings, one of which works like a gigantic, curved mirror. The glass surface of the northernmost building reflects light down into the shadow cast by its southern partner. And the carefully defined curve of that glass allows the reflected light to follow the shadow throughout the day. Note that the reflected light is diffuse—not a focused death ray that could fry an egg or burn tourists . “The relationship between the sun and shadow is the relationship between the two buildings,” says Christian Coop, NBBJ’s design director.

15
Einstein's miracle year - Larry Lagerstrom

As the year 1905 began, Albert Einstein faced life as a “failed” academic. Yet within the next twelve months, he would publish four extraordinary papers, each on a different topic, that were destined to radically transform our understanding of the universe. Larry Lagerstrom details these four groundbreaking papers.

16
How to make hard choices

Here's a talk that could literally change your life. Which career should I pursue? Should I break up — or get married?! Where should I live? Big decisions like these can be agonizingly difficult. But that's because we think about them the wrong way, says philosopher Ruth Chang. She offers a powerful new framework for shaping who we truly are.

17
Most Innovative Companies 2015

For making the content it knows (with data!) we’ll all love.

18
Why Children Need Chores

I don't yet have kids of my own, but if I do, I will certainly give them a list of chores to do. This article isn't saying that giving kids chores is better than resume building for college admissions or internships. As the middle child, my other two siblings focused exclusively on academics as our parents had wanted us to. I valued academics, but found the responsibility of chores and physical labor a personal sense of satisfaction. There's a great quote from Bruce Almighty I love. Morgan Freeman says to Jim Carrey's character, "People underestimate the value of manual labor. There's freedom in it." Not one to grasp at strings, but my siblings are both liberals, are less content than me, and don't do the simple things like return shopping carts or plan out their day well. My point is, chores build character and add meaning to the idea that life is about work and balance. Its not just about doing what's best for you like getting into college, but being the best YOU for everyone. :)

19 MIT Technology Review

Keep me logged in

20
Apple CEO Tim Cook Tried To Give Steve Jobs His Liver—But Jobs Refused

"Somebody that’s selfish," Cook continues, "doesn’t reply like that. I mean, here’s a guy, he’s dying, he’s very close to death because of his liver issue, and here’s someone healthy offering a way out. I said, ‘Steve, I’m perfectly healthy, I’ve been checked out. Here’s the medical report. I can do this and I’m not putting myself at risk, I’ll be fine.’ And he doesn’t think about it. It was not, ‘Are you sure you want to do this?’ It was not, ‘I’ll think about it.’ It was not, ‘Oh, the condition I’m in . . .’ It was, ‘No, I’m not doing that!’ He kind of popped up in bed and said that. And this was during a time when things were just terrible. Steve only yelled at me four or five times during the 13 years I knew him, and this was one of them."

21
Einstein's brilliant mistake: Entangled states - Chad Orzel

When you think about Einstein and physics, E=mc^2 is probably the first thing that comes to mind. But one of his greatest contributions to the field actually came in the form of an odd philosophical footnote in a 1935 paper he co-wrote -- which ended up being wrong. Chad Orzel details Einstein's "EPR" paper and its insights on the strange phenomena of entangled states.

22 http://www.wired.com/2015/03/disney-magicband/

Staggs couches Disney’s goals for the MagicBand system in an old saw from Arthur C. Clarke. “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic,” he says. “That’s how we think of it. If we can get out of the way, our guests can create more memories.” He offers a story about how a program called Fast Passes once guaranteed a ride time at premier attractions like Space Mountain. It used to be that those passes were issued at the rides themselves, and stamped with a designated return time. You had to be there when it opened, because passes went quickly and unless you were a scheduling savant, it was hard to hold passes for more than one ride at a time. You’d see families waiting outside for the park to open, then fathers sprinting for a kiosk to get enough passes for everyone in the family. “I used to be that sprinter,” Staggs says.

23
A fully transparent solar cell that could make every window and screen a power source - ExtremeTech

24
The 20 most popular TED Talks of all time

Are schools killing creativity? What makes a great leader? How can I find happiness? These 20 talks are the ones that you and your fellow TED fans just can't stop sharing.

25
24 Clever Ideas Inside Virgin's New Hotel

It’s the little things, and anyone who’s flown Virgin America knows it: the calming purple mood lighting, the food and drink orders you can place electronically from your seats, the entertaining safety video, the ticket stubs that are 50% smaller than the obnoxious industry norm. All of these details assemble to make Virgin America one of the best flying experiences in the U.S.

26
http://www.wired.com/2015/03/disney-magicband/?mbid=social_twitter

Staggs couches Disney’s goals for the MagicBand system in an old saw from Arthur C. Clarke. “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic,” he says. “That’s how we think of it. If we can get out of the way, our guests can create more memories.” He offers a story about how a program called Fast Passes once guaranteed a ride time at premier attractions like Space Mountain. It used to be that those passes were issued at the rides themselves, and stamped with a designated return time. You had to be there when it opened, because passes went quickly and unless you were a scheduling savant, it was hard to hold passes for more than one ride at a time. You’d see families waiting outside for the park to open, then fathers sprinting for a kiosk to get enough passes for everyone in the family. “I used to be that sprinter,” Staggs says.

27
What makes us feel good about our work?

What motivates us to work? Contrary to conventional wisdom, it isn't just money. But it's not exactly joy either. It seems that most of us thrive by making constant progress and feeling a sense of purpose. Behavioral economist Dan Ariely presents two eye-opening experiments that reveal our unexpected and nuanced attitudes toward meaning in our work. (Filmed at TEDxRiodelaPlata.)

28
Mysterious spy cameras collecting data at post offices

DENVER — Within an hour of FOX31 Denver discovering a hidden camera, which was positioned to capture and record the license plates and facial features of customers leaving a Golden Post Office, the device was ripped from the ground and disappeared.

29 No, really, pi is wrong: The Tau Manifesto

Congratulations to pi (half tau) on its big day! Tau will have its revenge on June 28, 2031.

30
Why a Just-Smart-Enough Watch Is Better Than an Apple Watch

I picked up one of these bands a few weeks ago. The band is half organizer and half fitness band. It allows you to preview texts, emails and phone calls, and it has the best sensor package of any fitness product, including GPS, Accelerometer/Gyrometer, Optical heart rate monitor, Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) sensors, Ambient Light Sensor, and even a UV sensor.  With all of these sensors, the band doesn't just track steps - it tracks workouts, and can even offer suggested workout routines. I am looking forward to trying out the new bike tracker when the weather breaks.

31
How To Make $225 An Hour Writing Poetry

The idea for a poetry-writing business came about entirely by accident. In June 2013, college buddies Szentmiklosy and Zaltsman were playing with the idea of doing an interview series about entrepreneurship. They set up a little booth on a street corner in Williamsburg—which has the highest density of entrepreneurs per capita anywhere in the world—hoping to have focus-group-like conversations with anyone passing by. Since the two guys had a bit of a poetic streak, they thought they could write people haiku as a gimmick to draw them in. Little did they know that they had, in fact, landed on their own business idea. Within a week, they were asked to write haiku at a yoga festival. They agreed, and when they attended the event, they met Markuson, a performance artist who used typewriters and poetry in all her pieces. "It was amazing, like a unicorn bumping into another unicorn," Markuson recalls.

32
You've All Been Had, Keurig Coffee Is The Devil

WHO LOVES THAT KEURIG COFFEE? I don't get it. All that babble about "the experience," meaning the pain in the ass, of spooning out the coffee grounds, dealing with spilled coffee grounds all over the place, and filling up the pot... Really! I once heard about a guy who would only press his shirts by hand and only using starch he had mixed himself! The term OCD comes to mind. Why not "share the experience" of heating our homes and offices with firewood we "share the experience" of cutting and splitting by hand? But here's the baffling part: My wife and I have had coffee from various generations of automatic drip coffee maker going back years and years. Only when our coffee maker conked out did we knuckle under and buy a Keurig. I can't taste the difference but she says the coffee is better than any we've ever brewed. Dramatically better, she says. She's the connoisseur. Gotta defer. It also keeps our kitchen MUCH neater. Keurig it is.

33
'Firefly' stars reunite for crowdfunded Web series - CNET

"Con Man" is about the adventures of Wray Nerely (Tudyk), an actor who played a spaceship pilot in a cancelled series called "Spectrum," which became a beloved cult classic. Nerely makes his way through a mostly obscure life as a guest at fan conventions while his friend and co-star Jack Moore, played by Nathan Fillion of "Firefly" and "Castle," has gone on to A-list Hollywood fame.

34
NASA confirms there's an ocean on Jupiter's moon Ganymede

With Hubble, the scientists were able to collect over seven hours of data; most of that time was spent studying the aurorae seen in the moon's thin atmosphere. An aurora is the colorful result of charged particles interacting with an atmosphere — so just the existence of one doesn't mean there's an ocean. But oceans do change the behavior of aurorae. If there was no ocean on Ganymede, the aurorae would rock back and forth across about six degrees of the moon's circumference as it orbited Jupiter. The presence of a salty, electrically conductive ocean locks the aurorae in a much more stable position: According to the observations, they only move about two degrees. While the Hubble telescope made its observations in the UV spectrum, casting the aurorae in blue, they would actually appear red if you were to stand on the surface of Ganymede.

35
Sex needs a new metaphor. Here's one ...

For some reason, says educator Al Vernacchio, the metaphors for talking about sex in the US all come from baseball — scoring, getting to first base, etc. The problem is, this frames sex as a competition, with a winner and a loser. Instead, he suggests a new metaphor, one that's more about shared pleasure, discussion and agreement, fulfillment and enjoyment. Let's talk about … pizza.

36
Pi Day 2015: meet the man who invented π

William Jones married twice. One of the children of his second marriage was born barely three years before William died aged 74. Also named William Jones – a source of much subsequent confusion – the son became Sir William Jones (1746–1794). He was appointed as a Supreme Court judge in India and was an expert in the languages of the subcontinent. Sir William established links between Latin, Greek and Sanskrit, leading to the concept of ‘Indo-European languages’ that remains a cornerstone of modern linguistic theory. He was once introduced to the king of France as one who knew every language apart from his own – Welsh! It is highly likely, given his place of birth, that William Jones, the father, would have been fluent in both Welsh and English but, having lost his father when he was three, Sir William would not have had the opportunity to learn his father’s first language.

37
5 Big Ways Education Will Change By 2020

To May, that means paying attention to our condensing, shifting world. By 2100, more than half the world’s population will live in India, China, or Africa. "Global policy leadership and sales of education goods and services will be shaped less by issues and needs in the U.S., and more by the issues and needs of Africa, South Asia, and China," May says. "Market demand, and pressing policy issues related to urbanization and population growth, will shift the center of gravity of education provision."

38
Scientists reveal the hidden structure and size of our galaxy

∘<l<229∘, there is an oscillating asymmetry in the main sequence star counts on either side of the Galactic plane using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This asymmetry oscillates from more stars in the north at distances of about 2 kpc from the Sun to more stars in the south at 4-6 kpc from the Sun to more stars in the north at distances of 8-10 kpc from the Sun. We also see evidence that there are more stars in the south at distances of 12-16 kpc from the Sun. The three more distant asymmetries form roughly concentric rings around the Galactic center, opening in the direction of the Milky Way's spiral arms. The northern ring, 9 kpc from the Sun, is easily identified with the previously discovered Monoceros Ring. Parts of the southern ring at 14 kpc from the Sun (which we call the TriAnd Ring) have previously been identified as related to the Monoceros Ring and others have been called the Triangulum Andromeda Overdensity. The two nearer oscillations are approximated by a toy model in which the disk plane is offset by of the order 100 pc up and then down at different radii.

39
7 TED Talks that just might save your relationship

Have you ever felt like you're talking, but nobody is listening? Here's Julian Treasure to help. In this useful talk, the sound expert demonstrates the how-to's of powerful speaking — from some handy vocal exercises to tips on how to speak with empathy. A talk that might help the world sound more beautiful.

40
The infinite life of pi - Reynaldo Lopes

The ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter is always the same: 3.14159... and on and on (literally!) forever. This irrational number, pi, has an infinite number of digits, so we'll never figure out its exact value no matter how close we seem to get. Reynaldo Lopes explains pi's vast applications to the study of music, financial models, and even the density of the universe.

41
Tim Cook offered ailing Steve Jobs part of his liver, new bio says - CNET

In 2009, Jobs was visibly ill and suffering from a side effect of cancer called ascites, and he was in need of a liver transplant. Cook, quoted in a new Jobs biography, called "Becoming Steve Jobs," says that he did some research and had his blood tested to see if it would match Jobs'. After discovering that it would, he offered to donate a portion of his liver to his boss.

42
The Shocking Finding From the DOJ's Ferguson Report That Nobody Has Noticed

And this is precisely what occurs in Ferguson. As others have noted , the Ferguson courts appear to work as an orchestrated racket to extract money from the poor. The thousands upon thousands of warrants that are issued, according to the DOJ, are "not to protect public safety but rather to facilitate fine collection." Residents are routinely charged with minor administrative infractions. Most of the arrest warrants stem from traffic violations, but nearly every conceivable human behavior is criminalized. An offense can be found anywhere, including citations for "Manner of Walking in Roadway," "High Grass and Weeds," and 14 kinds of parking violation. The dystopian absurdity reaches its apotheosis in the deliciously Orwellian transgression "failure to obey." (Obey what? Simply to obey.) In fact, even if one does obey to the letter, solutions can be found. After Henry Davis was brutally beaten by four Ferguson officers , he found himself charged with "destruction of official property" for bleeding on their uniforms.

43
Newfound fossils from 480 million years ago unravel early arthropod evolution

Arthropods first appear in the fossil record some 530 million years ago. These joint-legged animals are the most species-rich and diverse animal group on Earth. The familiar creatures are virtually ubiquitous: horseshoe crabs, scorpions, spiders, ticks, millipedes and centipedes, crabs, lobsters, pill bugs, butterflies, ants, mosquitos, beetles, and the list goes on.

44
It Took the Telephone 75 Years to Do What Angry Birds Did in 35 Days. But What Does That Mean?

The idea that new technology is spreading faster than ever before has become conventional wisdom. The report notes it took 75 years for telephones to achieve 50 million users, while Angry Birds reached that goal in a mere 35 days. One of the more colorful comparisons, they note, appeared in Forbes—which recently pointed out that WhatsApp gained more followers in its first six years than Christianity did in its first 19 centuries.

45
This finger-mounted camera helps the blind to read - CNET

The team also tested two methods of guiding the user's finger: haptic motors on the top and bottom of the finger that vibrated when the user's finger started to move away from the line, alerting them to move their finger back up or down the page; and a musical tone that sounds when the finger strays. Users testing the system evinced no preference for one or the other, so the team elected to go with the audio sensor, since the haptic motors add weight and bulk to the device.

46
The TheTechNewsBlog Daily

The TheTechNewsBlog Daily, by TheTechNewsBlog: updated automatically with a curated selection of articles, blog posts, videos and photos.

47
App Could Help Officials Prosecute Rapists In Developing World

Picture taken on October 2, 2010 shows women of the village of Kampala attending a meeting with Margot Wallström , the Special Representative of the Secretary General for Sexual Violence and Leïla Zerougui (both unseen), the Special Representative of the Secretary General in DRC in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. The village of Kampala is situated in the area of Walikala, where more than 300 women were raped in August by FDLR forces and Maï Maï militians. The Democratic Repu | AFP via Getty Images

48
Apartment complex with “no bad reviews” rule gets pummeled on review sites

Other reviews include obviously false statements, like the user on ApartmentRatings.com who wrote: "Help. I've been trapped in the dungeon here for 10 years because I wrote a bad review. It's not so bad though. They feed me and sometimes I can see light through the cracks in the wall."

49
Algorithmia Launches With More Than 800 Algorithms On Its Marketplace

Algorithmia gives developers the ability to turn algorithms into scalable web services with a single click. Application developers can then integrate the algorithm into their own applications with under 10 lines of code. Algorithmia hosts the web services , makes them discoverable and enables algorithm developers to get paid for usage.

50
Turning dunes into architecture

Architecture student Magnus Larsson details his bold plan to transform the harsh Sahara desert using bacteria and a surprising construction material: the sand itself.

51 These 3 Beautiful Notebooks Will Make You Want To Toss Your Moleskine
52 At SXSW, St. Bernard Dogs Will Rescue Those Needing A Phone Charge
53 Get Set For A Very Special Pi Day
54 Why an iPhone will never replace my DSLR
55 How The Apple Watch Will Change Office Life
56 One of Saturn's moons might have warm enough water for life, research shows - CNET
57 Hireside chat: How to spot a 'paycheck employee'
58 The most powerful people under 30
59 National Geographic on Twitter
60 Religion, evolution, and the ecstasy of self-transcendence
61 7 TED Talks on the complexity of memory
62 12 Buildings To See In New York Before You Die
63 What I’ve Learned About Deal Sourcing
64 Rogue One Will Be First Star Wars Stand-Alone Film - IGN
65 Apple's MacBook Air: Once a darling, now a budget laptop - CNET
66 Google Chromebook Pixel Preview - CNET
67 Microsoft is celebrating Pi Day with an Xbox Music Pass deal
68 Designing books is no laughing matter. OK, it is.
69 Watch Four Years of Oil Drilling Collapse in Seconds
70 Google’s hilarious autocomplete suggestions have been turned into a game
71 New solar installs beat wind and coal two years in a row
72 Microsoft not investing in Android modder Cyanogen, says Bloomberg
73 Find the Right Expert for Any Problem
74 What separates us from chimpanzees?
75 This is your brain on math, explained in pie charts
76 Move Over, Email—the Business Phone Call Is Back
77 Dark side of Japan revealed in film about Internet cafe living
78 Schematics - The Bob Moog Foundation
79 CSS SANS
80 Apple MacBook (2015) Preview - CNET
81 Egypt unveils plans for new capital
82 http://venturebeat.com/2015/03/12/whatsapp-becomes-the-second-non-google-app-to-hit-1-billion-installs-on-android/
83 Technology and Electronics Reviews - USATODAY.com
84 10 things to consider before buying an LED bulb - CNET
85 Jeb Bush believes net neutrality rules are the 'craziest ideas'
86 Dove Demonstrates How Harsh Your Inner Critic Really Sounds
87 The new MacBook is impressive, but not for everyone (hands-on)
88 When it comes to tech, first doesn't matter
89 Einstein's most famous equation
90 1953: Are these the first miniskirts and hot pants?
91 This iPhone cover is the secret to Kim Kardashian's great selfies
92 Apple Gets Sweet Deals From Mall Operators
93 How to manage for collective creativity
94 Mother of slain Wisconsin teen: 'My son was never a violent man'
95 Apple's new super-thin MacBook may be a bad deal now, but just wait