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Create Your Own Interactive Sheet Music on the Web

Soundslice opens their user-friendly service to sheet music.

No, Twitter Didn't Change Its Refresh Feature — It's a Bug

Users are complaining the Twitter refresh isn't working as well as it used to, requiring users to refresh multiple times to see new tweets.

Scared New Mom Receives Touching Advice From Kids With Down Syndrome

These kids have a message for a scared mom-to-be: "Don't worry."

At Last! 'SimCity' Players Get Offline Mode

The offline, single-player mode of SimCity is finally here and now you can check out the details via a new video.

FX Releases Trailer for Upcoming 'Fargo' Series

The Coen Brother classic gets a small screen make over with Martin Freeman and Billy Bob Thornton.

How to make money from Spotify by streaming silence

Funk band Vulfpeck have worked out a way to make money from Spotify – release short clips of silence and ask fans to stream it repeatedly overnight. Could other bands take note?

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Top News
1
Meet The Wearable Gadget That Outsources Your Personal Trainer To India

Each coach has a background in personal fitness and has spent around two months studying a 118-page manual with chapters on nutrition and even cognitive behavioral therapy. From this April, they’ll start coaching around 1,000 people in India, all taking part in a beta phase for GOQii. The company plans to start selling its service in the United States at the end of this year, likely for more than what it charges in India, and by then have hundreds of coaches. Remote fitness coaching is nothing new. Sessions, which connects users with individual trainers, recently got bought  out by MyFitnessPal. Chicago-based RetroFit also pairs fitness and nutrition experts with customers, but it charges a minimum $250 per month. Gondal keeps costs low by capitalizing on the experience of local staff in “business process outsourcing,” hiring managers in India from IBM IBM and Wipro Wipro . “It’s the perfect combination of man and machine,” he says. One other intriguing part of GOQii is its philanthropic play.

2
Starting Today, Jealous Lovers Can Buy NSA-Like Monitoring Powers

Imagine this happy occasion. On his girlfriend’s birthday a man announces he has a special gift. She unwraps the box to find a sleek new Android phone. She throws her arms around him and lands a warm kiss for his kindness.

3
The TheTechNewsBlog Daily

The TheTechNewsBlog Daily, by TheTechNewsBlog: updated automatically with a curated selection of articles, blog posts, videos and photos.

4
Google sued for data-mining students' email

Any email service that features a search function scans the content of emails that are sent and received regardless of who it was sent by. Additionally the data mining and scanning functions are outlined in the commercial agreement documents that the educational institutions would of agreed to. By proxy when the student agreed to the schools services agreement for access to school computer networks they likely agreed to any agreements the school had made with the service providers. I think this lawsuit is ridiculous and to illustrate my point the students likely didn't agree to the network shaping techniques the schools ISP uses yet have probably used it to access all sorts of personal information, should they be allowed to sue them as well for violation of wire tap laws?

5
The Two Most 'Dreaded, Hated' Words At Steve Jobs' Apple

"In Steve's mind," she recalls, "people associated brands with television advertising and commercials and artificial things. The most important thing was people's relationship to the product. So any time we said 'brand' it was a dirty word."

6
What I learned from going blind in space

There's an astronaut saying: In space, “there is no problem so bad that you can’t make it worse.” So how do you deal with the complexity, the sheer pressure, of dealing with dangerous and scary situations? Retired colonel Chris Hadfield paints a vivid portrait of how to be prepared for the worst in space (and life) — and it starts with walking into a spider’s web. Watch for a special space-y performance.

7
A New App Turns Your Instagrams Into Nail Art

Angel Anderson, one of the app's creators, was inspired by her love of Instagram . While images on the social network have a certain level of impermanence — showing up on your feed only to be quickly replaced by others — NailSnaps lets those photos have a place in the real world for a little bit longer. Plus, Anderson was on the hunt for unique designs that wouldn't take a lot of time to create.

8
5 Insane Ways Animals Changed the Course of Humanity

With two different kinds of lice re-enacting the Battle of Helm's Deep on our bodies, the irritation was enough that we evolved to shed most of our body hair in order to segregate the factions to opposing sides of the body. The head lice were free to rule from the neck up and can only survive on the human scalp. The pubic lice were king of the crotch, using the thicker hairs to hold on with their big claws. The armpits, the only other place where pronounced body hair exists, are presumably the Demilitarized Zone. And that's how humans came to look the way they do today: thanks to hordes of tiny crotch-biting insects.

9
Why We Hate Google Glass — And All New Tech | TechCrunch

I have a theory. When it comes to new technology, there are early adopters who start using it and everyone else sees the very worst in the technology: These people ultimately belittle, dismiss and make fun of those who use it. But in spite of this initial negative reaction, the technology eventually finds its way into the mainstream, and the early fears and misinformation fade away.

10
'Project Morpheus' is Sony's virtual reality headset for the PlayStation 4

The rumors are true: Sony's working on virtual reality. The hardware is called "Project Morpheus" and it's headed to the PlayStation 4. The headset is two pieces: a closed display and what looks like a PlayStation Move sensor built in. SCE Worldwide Studios head Shuhei Yoshida unveiled it on-stage tonight at GDC 2014; he said the "prototype" is "by no means final." It's the culmination of over three years of work, Yoshida said, and the prototype unveiled tonight will also double as a dev kit.

11
The Netherlands paves the way for carrier-free SIM cards

If you live in the Netherlands, you'll no longer have to be tied to a specific carrier, as it becomes the first country to legalize carrier-free SIM cards.

12
How This Woman Is Changing The Future Of Porn

I would say to my 25-year-old self, and what I say to every 25-year-old woman, is have confidence in yourself. The trouble is that from the moment we’re born as women, the world conspires to make us feel insecure about absolutely everything in a way that doesn’t happen for men. We are made to feel insecure about the way we look, the way we dress, the way we talk. Nice girls do this, nice girls don’t do that. I’ve realized from the great height of age 54, that the single worst dynamic in life and in business is the fear of what other people think. The best moment in my life -- it wasn’t a moment, more of a gradual realization -- was the day I realized I didn’t give a damn what anybody thought about me. Have the confidence to believe in your own opinions and your own thoughts. Be yourself, and coming out of that, have the confidence to decide what you would like to do in business. And if it doesn’t exist, start it.

13
You Can Take Selfies of Your Aorta With This Mini Camera | Wired Design | Wired.com

Though it’s roughly the size of a grain of uncooked quinoa, the images it produces are able to replace two people in the surgical theater. Prior to the invention of this speck-sized sensor, technicians would pore over lower-fidelity cross-sectional images and guide the surgeon verbally while she held the patient’s life in her hands. Degertekin likens his little invention to a flashlight that illuminates the obstructions in a blood vessel, giving doctors a direct look at what they’re up against.

14
Chromecast Launched in Canada, the UK and 9 other European Countries

Google has finally launched its Chromecast streaming dongle — which allows for ’casting’ of content from a smartphone, tablet or laptop to any HDMI-equipped TV — outside the US for the first time since it launched in July last year .

15
Facebook Creates Software That Matches Faces Almost as Well as You Do | MIT Technology Review

Facebook’s new software, known as DeepFace, performs what researchers call facial verification (it recognizes that two images show the same face), not facial recognition (putting a name to a face). But some of the underlying techniques could be applied to that problem, says Taigman, and might therefore improve Facebook’s accuracy at suggesting whom users should tag in a newly uploaded photo.

16
Einstein's Gravitational Waves Discovered

Cosmic inflation, meanwhile, was proposed by MIT’s Alan Guth (who attended the CfA press conference) in 1979 and explains why the universe appears to be bigger than its age suggests. Guth theorised that when the universe went through a phase change – akin to the change when a liquid becomes a solid – it released huge amounts of energy, enough to cause it to swell faster than the speed of light for a violent instant, at a time when the entire universe was lest than the size of a single proton.

17
Quantum Supergravity Could Explain Weirdness of Black Holes - Wired Science

Physicists have searched for a theory of quantum gravity for 80 years. Though gravitons are individually too weak to detect, most physicists believe the particles roam the quantum realm in droves, and that their behavior somehow collectively gives rise to the macroscopic force of gravity, just as light is a macroscopic effect of particles called photons. But every proposed theory of how gravity particles might behave faces the same problem: upon close inspection, it doesn’t make mathematical sense. Calculations of graviton interactions might seem to work at first, but when physicists attempt to make them more exact, they yield gibberish — an answer of “infinity.” “This is the disease of quantized gravity,” Stelle said.

18
Samsung Debuts the Ultimate Selfie Camera, the NX Mini

The NX Mini has great specs for its size: The 1-inch sensor captures pics up to 20.5 megapixels, and it can shoot video in 1080p format at 30 frames per second (H.264). Because of its small size, the controls are closer to a point-and-shoot than a prosumer camera, with zero dials manual controls accessible via the touch LCD. Like Samsung's recent NX cameras and Gear watches , the NX Mini runs the Tizen OS.

19
GitHub For Beginners: Don't Get Scared, Get Started

That’s all you need to do to get started using Git on your computer. However, since you did set up a GitHub.com account, it’s likely you don’t just want to manage your project locally, but also online. If you want you can also set up Git so it doesn’t ask you to log in to your GitHub.com account every time you want to talk to it. For the purposes of this tutorial, it isn’t a big deal since we’ll only be talking to it once. The full tutorial to do this, however, is located on GitHub .

20
The Tiny Satellites That Could Have Found the Missing Plane Within Hours

A company called Planet Labs is in the process of activating a squadron of tiny satellites that they released from the International Space Station last month. These compact satellites will orbit Earth, snapping images of nearly every inch of our planet. As Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield pointed out, they may have filled the blind spots of the satellites that failed to keep up with the plane after it lost contact.

21
Auto dealers fire back at Tesla CEO: 'This Musk guy, he wants all the profits for himself'

In his response to the New Jersey ban, Musk recommended customers head across the Hudson River to visit the Tesla showroom in lower Manhattan. But unless Tesla can find a way to match the influence auto dealers currently have with state legislators, the situation in New Jersey could be a harbinger for the company’s business prospects in many other parts of the country. "Mr. Musk is a brilliant man, and Tesla is an innovative company. We can all respect that," says NJ CAR’s Appleton. "But he doesn’t get what it takes to do business in New Jersey. With all due respect, his legal opinions are about as sound as my programming abilities."

22
The Next Big Thing You Missed: 3-D Printing Promises Better Bionic Limbs for the War-Wounded | Wired Business | Wired.com

But the Sengeh’s project doesn’t just improve the comfort of artificial limbs. It also lets non-experts manufacturer them. As 3-D printing becomes an increasingly commoditized technology, fashioning these sophisticated devices could be as easy as feeding a limb scan into a piece of software, which could potentially happen anywhere. Sengeh says experts in prosthesis-making are scarce, and not just in Sierra Leone. By developing a software-based approach to better limb-making, he hopes that he has found a way to package this expertise and distribute it worldwide.

23
A Glimpse at Wes Anderson's Centered State of Mind [VIDEO]

"For as long as a single man is forced to cower under the iron fist of oppression, as long as a child cries out in the night, or an actor can be elected president, we must continue the struggle." - Hillary Flammond (Lucy Gutteridge)

24
Facebook's DeepFace Software Can Match Faces With 97.25% Accuracy

Have you noticed that Facebook is getting better at making suggestions for people to tag in the photos that you have uploaded? Facebook will only get better at identifying faces thanks to advances in artificial intelligence and “deep learning.” Facebook researchers are currently developing algorithms called “DeepFace” to detect whether two faces in unfamiliar photos are of the same person with 97.25% accuracy, regardless of lighting conditions or angles. As a comparison, humans generally have an average of 97.53% accuracy. This means that Facebook’s facial-processing software has nearly the same accuracy as humans.

25
Dropbox Will Soon Let You Link Business and Personal Accounts

Dropbox plans to give users the ability to switch between business and personal files without having to constantly sign in and out.

26
With Help From MIT Engineer, Marathon Bombing Survivor To Dance Again

I’m thrilled to have danced again. It was invigorating to dance publicly with my new leg, but also to realize that my return to dance may have the power to inspire other people to reach for their goals and be proactive in their lives. I was always determined to dance again, and I knew that I had to, that I would, and here I am. My first dance happening to be so near the anniversary of the marathon bombing stands as a reminder that I’m a survivor, not a victim.

27
How To Extract Sheet Music From YouTube Videos

Stepping back and looking at the digital music space, it seems there’s something brewing around the further dissection of music, whether it be by picking out the lyrics like Rap Genius is or providing tools to learn how to play the songs. A lot of companies are slowly moving in these directions in music to further target the more enthusiastic fans, if not make music creation more accessible to the masses.

28
Apple Gives A Surprising Push To Windows 8 On New Mac Pro | Cult of Mac

Windows 8 has been a gigantic flop for Microsoft, but Apple, at least, is giving the new operating system a surprising push. The Mac maker has dropped support for Windows 7 running under Boot Camp on the new Mac Pro, making the installation of Windows 8 the only option for those who want to dual boot Windows on the most powerful Mac yet.

29
This Is What Finding Love Online Looks Like

It wasn’t long ago that online dating—and admitting you were dating someone you met online—was a taboo subject. Couples who met online would defer questions about how they met or even make up a story far less scandalous than meeting “anonymously” over the Internet. Clearly that isn’t the case anymore.

30
Please Let This Be Peak Selfie | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

Yes, people do take pictures of themselves quite a lot now–probably because they always have cameras. But the reality is that people have always been captivated by their own images, long before we had a clever new term for self-portraiture. Because that’s ultimately all a selfie is: a dumb word for a common practice that’s as old as photography itself(ie). In fact, it even predates photography. You know who was really good at selfies? Van Gogh. I mean, at least he had the decency to cut his ear off to make his selfie more interesting–that beats the hell out of making a duck face, every time. You might be interested to hear that there was once this dude named Narcissus who … ugh. Forget it.

31
Mercury Is Wrinkling Like A Raisin

Mercury, the Sun’s smallest and closest planet, has shrivelled in diameter by 14km, up to nine times more than previously estimated, since its crust first hardened more than four billion years ago.

32
A Guide to Boston's Startup Scene

Boston is brimming with entrepreneurial success, as many startup founders have strategically chosen this urban hub for their small business' home. Mayor Marty Walsh recently declared his utmost confidence that Boston will become the "tech capital of the world," and judging from the city's current startup surge, Walsh's prediction may come to fruition.

33
Science or Art? Beautiful Illustrations of Animals From 170 Years Ago - Wired Science

Published in 1844, the Atlas de Zoologie: ou collection de 100 planches contains illustrations of a number of creatures, some of which no longer walk this planet. Among those are thylacines — striped, carnivorous marsupials that went extinct when the last known specimen died in a Tasmanian zoo in 1936.

34
People Who Use E-Readers Dive Far Deeper Into Books | Underwire | Wired.com

Digital publishing is rapidly becoming a haven for struggling writers—but it turns out the format might hold similar potential for struggling readers too.

35
The Tiny Satellites That Could Have Found the Missing Plane Within Hours

A company called Planet Labs is in the process of activating a squadron of tiny satellites that they released from the International Space Station last month. These compact satellites will orbit Earth, snapping images of nearly every inch of our planet. As Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield pointed out, they may have filled the blind spots of the satellites that failed to keep up with the plane after it lost contact.

36
Pandora Raises Price of Ad-Free Streaming for Some Listeners

Listeners who now pay $36 a year for the service will be asked to pay $3.99 a month, Pandora said today on its blog. For new subscribers, the price will be $4.99 a month, starting in May. Existing users of a $3.99-a-month plan will see no change.

37
The Narwhal's Tusk Is Filled With Nerves. But Why? - Wired Science

He found that narwhal heart rates rose in response to high salt concentrations, presumably because these concentrations normally suggest that the sea is freezing and entrapment is possible. The animals’ heart rates dropped when the tusks were washed with fresh water, suggesting they could detect this change. But, Nweeia says, salt is just one of many environmental stimuli the tusks could be sensing. “Our premise was just to open the pathway for people understand that this is a sensory organ,” he says. “Now the pathway is open for people, including ourselves, to look at other variables it might also detect.”

38
Catching a Cheater Online

As J.C. and Christina exchanged emails in preparation for the test (or at least the false assumption that J.C. would be taking the test), J.C. posted updates in the Facebook group. The sting operation became a central preoccupation of these teachers’ lives. Many of the teachers saw this exchange as an opportunity to get inside the mind of a cheater and understand the mindset of all the other students who cheat in their classes. Others yearned for the opportunity to catch even one student in the act. Many followed the saga for the vicarious thrill of the chase. One professor commented, “I don’t know what this says about me, but this is the most exciting thing I’ve seen since my first child was born eight years ago.”

39
Twitter gives up on encrypting direct messages, at least for now

Other Silicon Valley giants are upping their encryption game, however, and startups like Wickr are raising the bar for secure messaging. Privacy advocates believe direct message encryption is important if Twitter is to maintain its sterling reputation. "Encryption of communications is vital," Kurt Opsahl, senior staff attorney at the EFF, says of Twitter’s decision to stop encrypting DMs. "We know... that there is an active attempt to get unencrypted communications through internet companies’ internal traffic." Chris Soghoian, a senior policy analyst for the American Civil Liberties Union, says Twitter should go a step further and prevent direct messages from being readable even with a court order. "Direct messages are probably the most private category of user information held by Twitter, and the company should be encrypting DMs end-to-end," he says.

40
Solar-Powered Toilet Turns Poop Into Charcoal-Like Pellets

Led by Karl Linden, an environmental engineering professor at the University of Colorado, a team of engineers built the Sol-Char, a toilet that scorches waste via fiber-optic cables, heated by solar concentrators on the roof. The system produces a useful byproduct called biochar, a sanitary charcoal briquette-like material that can be used for agricultural fertilizer and soil amendment.

41
13 Famous Quotes Modernized for the Internet

These beloved quotes from historic thinkers and famous celebrities were overdue for an upgrade, so we translated them for the modern age.

42
Brilliant Bike Glows Like the Sun When Headlights Hit It | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

During the day, the Lumen looks like a city bike with a snappy, slightly sparkling gray paint job. But at night, it comes alive. The reflective action relies on the “cat’s eye” effect. When illuminated by a car’s headlights (or any light source), each microscopic sphere reflects light back at the source. The closer the car gets, the greater the intensity of the reflection. It’s a trick that’ll surely get you noticed–as long as the driver’s view isn’t completely obscured by the screen of his Galaxy Note.

43 Why Cloud Browsers Are The Wave Of The Future

A tiring bit of Internet security advice one often hears suggests using a separate and dedicated browser for sensitive transactions such as online banking or checking your medical data. In the past this meant sorting out which was the secure browser and then avoiding it for other purposes or even using a different computer altogether.

44
Twitter Still Has An Identity Problem Eight Years Later

On Facebook, which is still the world’s most popular social network, you’re encouraged to add friends that you know personally, and grow your community privately by sharing personal information to a relatively small network of people you already know. You can tailor your privacy settings to only allow friends and family to see your posts and comments, or you can have a public page from which publications can embed status updates. 

45
Why We're Hardwired to Binge on Netflix

Never before have we been such compulsive multi-taskers, blogging and tweeting using multiple devices and smartphones anywhere and everywhere, from trains to cafes. It seems a little backwards, then, that one of the top post-workday hobbies for many is enjoying the complex storylines of TV series such as Game of Thrones , Breaking Bad , and House of Cards , which engross us for hours on end.

46
Cartographers Debate How to Map Crimea

Much of the world is watching how the high-stakes tug-of-war over Crimea will play out, but few groups of professionals are more invested than cartographers.

47
Live from PlayStation's 'Driving the Future of Innovation' panel (the VR one)

Live from PlayStation's 'Driving the Future of Innovation' panel (the VR one)

48
Opposition Newspaper Editor Accuses Venezuelan Official of Censorship

The editor of a Venezuelan newspaper accused the number two official in President Nicolas Maduro's government of trying to censor his publication with an illegal defamation suit.

49
Konami Code Unlocks 'Cheat Mode' in Google Voice Search

The infamous Konami Code , a sequence of button inputs that unlocks secrets and cheat modes in classic games such as Gradius, Contra and Castlevania, has achieved folklore status on the Web.

50
End Anonymous Companies

Forgot your password?

51 Oppo Find 7 is the world's first phone that can take 50MP photos (video)
52 Airbnb Talks Branching Out Into Other Services
53 For Watch Nerds, the Moto360 Is a Sure Bet
54 Berlin gets its own internet domain
55 The First Org Chart Ever Made Is a Masterpiece of Data Design | Wired Design | Wired.com
56 A 10-Point Plan to Keep the NSA Out of Our Data | Threat Level | Wired.com
57 Oculus Rift to Deliver Second-Gen Virtual Reality Headset for Developers
58 Comcast's Uber-Inspired App May Ease Your Hatred of Cable Companies
59 The hunter becomes the hunted: insect evolves to eat poisonous corn
60 Dark Arts
61 Data Missing From Malaysia Airlines Pilot and Other News You Need to Know
62 You Decide the Menu at the Next Hottest Restaurant
63 Back to Reality for the College Kid Behind 'Sochi Problems'
64 A Comprehensive Guide to Testing Web Apps
65 TED Live
66 Disrupting Breakfast: Taco Bell's Waffle Taco Taste Test
67 Friendster Founder's Social News Service Opens to Public
68 How Google Does Fundamental Research Without a Separate Research Lab | MIT Technology Review
69 Soundwave Comes to the Desktop with a Chrome Extension
70 Sony Playstation 2014 GDC Session
71 The History of Flat Design: Efficiency, Minimalism, Trendiness
72 How Quickly Did Your Country Adopt the Internet? [MAP]
73 Is ITT Tech screwing over students?
74 Sony set to reveal PS4 virtual reality headset at GDC 2014
75 Motorola’s Moto 360 Android Wear Smartwatch: The Details You Want - Personal Tech News - WSJ
76 Scientist: Iceland's Hekla Volcano Close to Erupting
77 Bugs Have Already Evolved Immunity to GMO Corn
78 How to Watch the Moto 360 Smartwatch Event
79 Firefox 28 Arrives with VP9 Video Decoding, HTML5 Volume Controls
80 The Google Drive Price Cut Changes The Game For Personal Cloud Storage
81 Dupe Your Boss With Bud Light's Digital March Madness Toolkit
82 US tech giants knew of NSA data collection, agency's top lawyer insists
83 Luxury Electric Car for Kids Comes With 4-Wheel Drive, Sound System | Gadget Lab | Wired.com
84 Kill the DRM in Your Old iTunes Music Purchases | Gadget Lab | Wired.com
85 Body Dryer is like a Dyson Airblade for your whole body
86 Unusually Intense El Nino May Lie Ahead, Scientists Say
87 From What Perspective Do Mashable Readers See the World?
88 Netflix Nabs Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin for Original Series 'Grace and Frankie'
89 Man, mad at Internet seller, texts him Shakespeare (all of it)
90 The Google Drive Price Cut Changes The Game For Personal Cloud Storage
91 Sony Playstation 2014 GDC Session
92 Look, Smartphone: No Hands! | MIT Technology Review
93 Turntable.fm shuts down for good as founder launches new social app
94 Why People Unsubscribe From Mailing Lists (And How to Win Them Back)