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Apple's 'Liam' robot takes apart your iPhone for recycling

Ever wonder where your iPhone goes after it dies?

MIT researchers want to rid the world of traffic lights

MIT researchers have released a study looking at the roads of our future, which feature no traffic lights.

Twitter is 10 and it's still not a social network

This week, Twitter turns 10. Over the next five days we'll be exploring how far the microblogging service has come, the challenges it faces going forward a

Preoccupied selfie girl gets a face full of tuba

Bet she's wishing that guy played the flute.

Here's your first (unofficial) look at 'Pokemon' on smartphones

'Pokemon Go' blends creature battles with the real world.

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1
Forbes Welcome

2
Meet the women fighting on the front lines of an American war

In 2011, the US Armed Forces still had a ban on women in combat — but in that year, a Special Operations team of women was sent to Afghanistan to serve on the front lines, to build rapport with locals and try to help bring an end to the war. Reporter Gayle Tzemach Lemmon tells the story of this "band of sisters," an extraordinary group of women warriors who helped break a long-standing barrier to serve.

3
Apple's iPhone SE announcement: what to expect from today's event

One way or another, we're expecting to see a much more powerful 9.7-inch iPad than what Apple currently has on sale. It also means some interesting things for the Air line, should Apple really launch this one under the Pro name: it cements a clear division between Apple's high-end and low-end tablets, much like it's long had with laptops; that means we'll eventually start to see more differentiation between the two, with the Pro line receiving more powerful processors and features, while the Air line remains more affordable.

4 Recap: Apple introduces the iPhone SE at $399

Recap: Apple introduces the iPhone SE at $399 Tech giant also unveiled smaller model of the iPad Pro. Check out this story on USATODAY.com: http://usat.ly/1pERd8g

5 Old Kindles will be disconnected from the internet unless you update by Tuesday

That old Kindle sitting in your desk drawer is about to get locked out from the internet. Amazon is warning customers of older Kindle e-readers that they must update by Tuesday, March 22nd, or else they will no longer be able to access the Kindle Store or sync with the cloud. That means, most importantly, that you won't be able to download new books. The emergency update is for the original Kindle Paperwhite (2012) and every Kindle before it. If you do not update your Kindle before that date, Amazon says you'll receive this warning when you try to access internet services:

6 iPhone SE specs, price and release date: What you need to know ahead of Apple's 5pm iPhone launch today

The biggest development is the iPhone SE - an upgrade to Apple's last cheap phone, the iPhone 5c, which went on the market at £469 in 2013. Apple has realised the mistake it made three years ago when it mistook value for money with different design tastes, and created a garish, plastic iPhone. The iPhone SE and smaller iPad Pro both show that Apple is beginning to understand that it can create affordable products that are just as beautiful.

7
Xiaomi's Mi 5 is an alarmingly good $260 smartphone

Last, but certainly not least, on the Mi 5’s list of strengths is this phone’s battery life. The 3,000mAh battery inside is claimed by the company to have the highest density in any consumer device yet, and it’s married to new display backlight technology that makes the Mi 5’s screen as much as 17 percent more efficient than previous generations. Those attributes are helped by the Snapdragon 820’s efficiency — this new chip exhibits none of the overheating and power consumption flaws that plagued last year’s 810 — and Android Marshmallow’s Doze mode for powering down the phone’s radios when not in active use. The result is a phone that causes me no anxiety about being away from a charger. From the start of a busy day until late in the evening, I’m consuming roughly a third of the Mi 5’s battery, and it takes me as much as 22 hours to go through half of it. One day’s use is easy, and two days aren’t out of the question with some judicious power management. HTC’s One A9 and the OnePlus X are in the same size and weight class as the Mi 5, but both are comfortably surpassed by Xiaomi’s new flagship.

8
Legendary former Intel CEO Andy Grove is dead at 79

Andy Grove, who fled from Nazi and Soviet oppression to become one of the most powerful business leaders in the global tech industry as the chairman and CEO of Intel, died on Monday. He was 79. The cause of death was not reported, though Grove was a longtime sufferer of Parkinson's disease.

9 What to Expect From Apple's iPhone SE and iPad Pro Event

The new iPhone, which will probably be called “SE” for reasons still unknown , will reportedly be a throwback to the 5s with its manageable, 4-inch screen. But also expect some lighter specs. Unlike the iPhone 6s, we don’t think it will have a camera that supports 4K , and doubt it will have 3D Touch .

10
How the Feds Could Get Into iPhones Without Apple’s Help

The government is so intent on forcing Apple’s hand that in each case the Justice Department has invoked the 200-year-old law All Writs Act to do it. But application of the Act requires the government to show that it has no other method of extracting data from the phones. And according to experts who spoke with WIRED, that’s not necessarily the case. They say there are ways the government can extract data on phones without Apple’s help, from using outside contractors to asking its friends at the NSA—ways that it has, in fact, already used in the past. The solutions won’t work for every iPhone the government has collected, and the solution offered for extracting data from the phone in San Bernardino involves some speculation about the NSA’s capabilities. But they do raise questions about whether the government has done everything it can do to collect the data it says it needs.

11
Tesla details the process for reserving a Model 3

If you want to put your name down for the car, you'll need to either visit a Tesla store on March 31st, which is the date of the unveil, or wait until reservations go live on Tesla's site around the time of the announcement, 8:30PM PT. You'll need to put down $1,000 upfront to get your name on the list. That sounds like a big chunk of change — and it is — but the waiting list is likely to fill up quickly: Tesla is still working through reservations of Model X, which first went into production late last year. Existing Tesla customers will get priority, and Tesla says that the best way to get an early reservation slot will be to go into a store when it opens on the 31st — if you wait until reservations go live on the website that evening, you'll be pretty far behind the curve.

12
Spotify hits 30 million subscribers

In order to provide our users with a better overall experience, we ask for more information from Facebook when using it to login so that we can learn more about our audience and provide you with the best possible experience. We do not store specific user data and the sharing of it is not required to login with Facebook.

13
Apple introduces the iPhone SE

If you’ve been hankering for a new iPhone that has all the power of the latest generations but fits in your hand like the old models, today is a good day for you.

14
Twitter at 10: a people’s history

More than any other tech company, Twitter was invented by its users. That’s no slight against the engineers and designers who actually built the thing. It’s just to say that what we think of as Twitter — that 24/7 torrent of news and entertainment, millions of people taking measure of the global heartbeat daily — came from us. And on the service’s 10th birthday, it feels like something very much worth celebrating.

15
Andrew S. Grove 1936 – 2016 | Intel Newsroom

Present at Intel’s 1968 founding with Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore, Andy Grove became Intel’s President in 1979 and CEO in 1987. He served as Chairman of the Board from 1997 to 2005. Both during his time at Intel and in retirement, Grove was one of the most influential figures in technology and business, writing best-selling books and widely cited articles, and speaking out on an array of prominent public issues.

16
The Harvard Library That Protects The World's Rarest Colors

A lot has changed in the art world since painters worked with "colormen"—as tradesmen in dyes and pigments were known—to obtain their medium. The commercialization of paints has transformed that process. "Artists today will use anything to get the idea that's in their head into a physical form," Khandekar says. "It could be pieces of plastic. It could be cans of food. It could be anything. We need to be able to identify lots of different materials that are industrially produced as well as things that are produced specifically for artists' use."

17
MIT Tech Review on Twitter

Sign up to get important tech news delivered straight to your inbox for free! - http://ow.ly/ZMhjM  #technews pic.twitter.com/qJ4hHoUBFn

18
A complicated hero in the war on dictatorship

Would you negotiate with someone you knew to be evil, to save lives? Samantha Power tells a story of a complicated hero, Sergio Vieira de Mello. This UN diplomat walked a thin moral line, negotiating with the world's worst dictators to help their people survive crisis. It's a compelling story told with a fiery passion.

19
Note-Taking Showdown: Evernote vs. OneNote (2016 Edition)

As similar in purpose as these two apps are, they’re distinct enough that you can use both in tandem, or one will speak more to you. Evernote is better for collecting and organizing information and mobile note-taking (though you’ll need to pay to access your notes offline). OneNote is better for creative note-taking and includes many of the features of Evernote Premium for free, such as offline access to notes on mobile, searching within attachments, and annotating PDFs. You also get more storage space (15GB free storage, shared with other Office apps) compared to Evernote’s free 60MB a month.

20 How does the SE stack up to the rest of the iPhone line?

The iPhone SE is the newest member of Apple's smartphone line, with a smaller size that makes it more pocket-friendly than either the 6s or 6s Plus . But, while the SE boasts a diminutive frame and familiar design, is that enough to make you choose it over its bigger siblings? Though you'll have to wait for our review for the ultimate verdict, we can at least compare the specs side by side to see how the SE stacks up on paper.

21
FBI says it might be able to unlock terrorist's iPhone without Apple's help

A Justice Department spokeswoman said in a statement that federal authorities had continued to seek an alternative way to access the phone's contents even during the heated litigation and public back-and-forth with Apple. If the new method works, it would help investigators to continue looking into the Dec. 2 terrorist attack that killed 14 people and wounded 22, said Melanie R. Newman, director of the Justice Department's office of public affairs.

22
Feds move to postpone iPhone hearing

Citing new leads about how to access an Apple iPhone used by one of the perpetrators of the San Bernardino terrorist attack, the Justice Department asked Monday to postpone a court hearing set for Tuesday on whether Apple should be forced to help the FBI break into that phone.

23
FBI backs off Apple, finds another way into iPhone 5c

On Sunday, March 20, 2016, an outside party demonstrated to the FBI a possiblemethod for unlocking Farook's iPhone. Testing is required to determine whether it is available method that will not compromise data on Farook's iPhone. If the method is viable, it should eliminate the need for the assistance from Apple Inc. ("Apple") set forthin the All Writs Act Order in this case.

24
The powerful woman behind a news site about refugees

The Bloomberg partnership changed the game for Setrakian. Her front-row seat for the Arab Spring also put her smack in the middle of the biggest changes to the news business in centuries: the rise of smartphones and Twitter. Combined with the object lesson of the Bloomberg Terminal, a split-second font of news that ran at rat-a-tat pace, Setrakian saw the flow of news changing, embracing video and tweets and text while building communities around discussion.

25
Carbon Emissions Haven't Been This High Since Dinosaurs Went Extinct

Carbon hasn’t entered our atmosphere this quickly in at least 66 million years—since an asteroid slammed into our planet and wiped out the dinosaurs, or perhaps even earlier. Our addiction to fossil fuels has pushed the planet into a “no-analog” state that’s “likely to result in widespread future extinctions,” an exceedingly humorless study published today in Nature Geoscience concludes.

26
Apple unveils a smaller iPad Pro, Apple’s vision of the future of computers

The new iPad is also a bit more expensive. Starting at $599, it’s $100 more than the entry-level iPad Air 2. But it also comes with 32GB instead of 16GB. For $749, you get 128GB of storage, and for $899 you get 256GB for the first time on an iOS device. It’s unclear how much the LTE options are going to cost. The iPad Air 2 is now $399, and the 12.9-inch iPad Pro now has a 256GB configuration. The 9.7-inch iPad Pro will be available in early April.

27
Boeing’s Monstrous Underwater Robot Can Wander the Ocean for 6 Months

Like Boeing’s other UUVs, the 50-ton Voyager runs on lithium-ion or silver zinc batteries that power it for a few days at a time. But instead of scooting over to a ship any time it’s running low on power, the Voyager just fires up a diesel generator that recharges the batteries. (It only turns on the generator at the surface, so the exhaust can be piped into the air). The Voyager works like a Chevy Volt, if the Volt carried a thousand gallons of fuel and could drive from San Francisco to Hong Kong without hitting a gas station. (The Volt is more fuel efficient, though—battling water resistance, the Voyager goes just 7.5 miles per gallon.)

28
Burner phones, not encryption, kept Paris terrorists off the authorities’ radar

As The New York Times says, one of the most striking aspects of the phones is that not a single e-mail or online chat message from the attackers was found on them. That seems to be further evidence that they knew such communications were routinely monitored by intelligence agencies. But rather than trying to avoid discovery by using encryption—which would in itself have drawn attention to their accounts—they seem to have stopped using the Internet as a communication channel altogether, and turned to standard cellular network calls on burner phones.

29
The DJI Phantom 4 Is the Best Drone I’ve Ever Crashed

The DJI Phantom 4 is a slick, feature-packed drone. People say it’s the drone that anybody can fly, the quadcopter that you just can’t crash. Let me be painfully clear about two things: 1) Not everyone can fly the Phantom 4, and 2) It’s pretty damn easy to crash.

30
Here’s What Space Actually Looks Like to the Human Eye

Cameras aboard spacecraft like New Horizons and Cassini take images using filters that isolate different wavelengths on the electromagnetic spectrum. Some, like red and blue, capture light the human eye can see. Others, like ultraviolet and infrared, capture light it can’t. All the images arrive to Earth as black-and-white frames, and then are assigned colors digitally and compiled into a composite. The trouble is, it’s not always clear whether an image you see floating around online is true color (showing visible light) or false color (showing invisible light). They can even be a mixture between the two. “When NASA releases images that are ‘false color’ because it shows something interesting about the atmosphere, I end up wincing a little,” Benson says, “because people who see those might think that’s what it really looks like.”

31
Facebook wants to be everywhere, except BlackBerry

BlackBerry's purple patch is well and truly over after Facebook pulled support for its social media app from the struggling mobile platform, with WhatsApp set to follow suit by years' end.

32
A Masterful Paint Job Makes This Millennium Falcon Toy Look Like a Star Wars Movie Prop

It’s no secret that professional model makers often use the same plastic model kits you can buy at a hobby shop, they’re just highly skilled at painting them to look incredibly realistic. Tristan Elliott instead started with Hasbro’s Battle Action Millennium Falcon toy , and with a little extra paint, turned it into a near-flawless film prop.

33 On Its 10th Birthday, a Short History of Twitter in Tweets

But for all its problems, Twitter is everywhere. It’s the place where the world talks to itself, often sharing and even making news in the process. Twitter has become a powerful force, but it wasn’t always that way.

34
The future of the bank branch is in trouble — here's why

pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you'll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. >>

35
iOS 9.3 is available now with new Night Shift feature

Apple's iOS 9.3 is now available to download. While it's only a minor release, it does have a surprising amount of features for iPads and iPhones. The biggest addition is a new Night Shift mode that shifts the color temperature of the display based on the time and location of your device. It's very similar to the popular F.lux tool, and it works by reducing the amount of blue light emitting from the screen. It's believed that exposure to bright blue light in the evening can make it harder to sleep, so you can automatically schedule Night Shift to turn on in the evenings.

36
First look: New nylon and milanese bands bring color, style to Apple Watch

Apple added a few fresh accessories to the Apple Watch lineup at Monday's special event, including a comfortable woven nylon strap design, new leather and Sport Band colors and the previously rumored Space Black Milanese loop. Available in seven color combinations , Apple's new nylon bands sport a unique four-layer construction that appears aesthetically similar to the sturdy NATO-style straps popularized by modern diving watches. The two-tone woven patterns add depth to the thick material, while a classic clasp makes for easy wearing and adjustment. According to CEO Tim Cook, about one third of all Apple Watch owners regularly swap out bands. To address this demographic, Apple introduced another set of seasonal colors for its fluoroelastomer Sport Band line — apricot, royal blue and yellow — alongside red and marine blue leather straps fitted with classic buckle hardware. The magnetic modern buckle style gets blue jay and marigold color options, while the popular leather loop is now available in storm gray and white. Finally, a Space Black Milanese loop, initially leaked in January , is up for sale.

37
This Is Why You Don't Ask The Internet To Name Things

Great Britain’s Natural Environment Research Council has a £200 million polar research vessel set for construction, and for some reason, they decided it was a good idea to ask the internet to come up with a name for it.

38
WSJD on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

39 Netflix raises the standard for its latest 'Recommended' TVs

Last year, Netflix launched its " Recommended TV " label to coax manufacturers to improve speeds on Smart TVs and, of course, push its service. This year, it's asking for more by making them meet five out of seven criteria, including instant on, TV resume, an up-to-date Netflix version, fast app launch, fast app resume and a Netflix button and icon. Only two manufacturers have earned the logo so far: Sony models like the SD85 and XD85 from the Android 4K series, and LG TVs with webOS 3.0, including the UH8500 and UH9500 . Other manufacturers, most notably Samsung, have yet to make the cut.

40
The FBI may be backing out of its case against Apple

It's unclear who provided the FBI with a method to potentially unlock the iPhone, but the filing does mention it came from someone outside the US government. It's also unclear whether or not Tuesday's hearing will still go through. However, it sounds like the FBI wants to give this a method a shot before going through a long legal battle with Apple.

41
Supreme Court to Hear Samsung Appeal in Apple Patent Case

WASHINGTON—The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday gave a boost to Samsung Electronics Co. in the smartphone patent wars, agreeing to consider the South Korean company’s appeal in a heated and long-running legal battle with rival Apple Inc.

42
Jumio to sell assets to backer and Facebook cofounder Eduardo Saverin as part of bankruptcy procedure

“Jumio created the online ID verification industry, and we are thriving from an operational standpoint as we continue to see robust bookings and build strong relationships with some of the most recognizable brands and companies in the world,” said Jumio CEO Stuut in the press release. “After thoroughly evaluating all available options, we determined that an asset sale is in the best interests of Jumio and our stakeholders. We expect this process to be seamless for our customers with no disruption to our operations. Despite some of the challenges Jumio’s leadership team inherited, our underlying business remains exceptionally strong. The court-supervised sale and restructuring process will allow us to strengthen the Company’s financial structure and extend our leadership position in ID verification.”

43
DOJ To Court: Hey, Can We Postpone Tomorrow's Hearing? We Want To See If We Can Use This New Hole To Hack In | Techdirt

Our top priority has always been gaining access into the phone used by the terrorist in San Bernardino. With this goal in mind, the FBI has continued in its efforts to gain access to the phone without Apple's assistance, even during a month-long period of litigation with the company. As a result of these efforts, an outside party demonstrated to the FBI this past weekend a possible method for unlocking the phone. We must first test this method to ensure that it doesn't destroy the data on the phone, but we remain cautiously optimistic. That is why we asked the court to give us some time to explore this option. If this solution works, it will allow us to search the phone and continue our investigation into the terrorist attack that killed 14 people and wounded 22 people.

44
Twitter at 10: a people’s history

More than any other tech company, Twitter was invented by its users. That’s no slight against the engineers and designers who actually built the thing. It’s just to say that what we think of as Twitter — that 24/7 torrent of news and entertainment, millions of people taking measure of the global heartbeat daily — came from us. And on the service’s 10th birthday, it feels like something very much worth celebrating.

45
Safari can open Twitter links again after latest OS X update

The Notes app is now able to be protected with specific passwords for individual entries to stop anyone reading your hastily scribbled thoughts. Notes will also let you migrate data from other services like Evernote with a new "Import Notes" option. OS X 10.11.4 has been in beta for a few months, but will be made available to everyone with a Mac running El Capitan today.

46
Senate proposal on encryption gives judges authority over Apple

(Reuters) – A bipartisan group of U.S. senators has begun circulating long-awaited draft legislation that would give federal judges clear authority to order technology companies like Apple to help law enforcement officials access encrypted data, according to sources familiar with the discussions.

47
The FBI Says It Might Not Need Apple to Unlock Terrorist's Phone Anymore

Apparently it was a busy weekend for the FBI. The agency was all set to face off with Apple on Tuesday over the unlocking of terrorist Syed Farook’s phone. But it now says that an “outside party” approached them on Sunday with a way to possibly unlock the phone.

48
FBI might have a way to unlock San Bernardino iPhone without Apple

As a refresher, last month the FBI filed a court order to force Apple to build a special software to unlock Farook's iPhone. Apple refused, saying the software would be a backdoor into the iPhone that would compromise the safety of hundreds of millions of users.

49
Microsoft Says Hiring Go-go Dancers At Xbox Party Was Wrong

San Francisco (AP) -- Microsoft says it was "unequivocally wrong" for hosting a party with scantily dressed female dancers during a video game developers' conference.

50
iMessage encryption isn’t perfect as researchers find a security hole

Files have been using a weak encryption method with a 64-bit encryption key. Researchers developed a server that mimics Apple’s own servers to intercept the encrypted files. They then attempted thousands of keys as Apple doesn’t throttle failed attempts. With this brute force method, researchers could decrypt files from Apple’s servers without anyone noticing.

51 GoDaddy launches AWS-style servers and apps to build, test and scale cloud services
52 Apple shows off new Apple Watch accessories, including a new Woven Nylon band
53 'Drunk' Policeman Who Went Viral Was Actually Having a Stroke
54 Refusing silence: Black poets protest and mourn in verse
55 Recap: Apple introduces the iPhone SE at $399
56 Microsoft Apologizes After Xbox Party Includes Scantily Clad Women
57 Tim Cook: Apple 'will not shrink' from responsibility to protect customer privacy
58 A Standing Desk Makes Me More Productive, Even If It’s Not “Healthier”
59 The iPhone SE is a powerful little blast from the past
60 Everything Apple Announced at its March 2016 Event
61 Log In - The New York Times
62 Google Now lets you block content from publishers you don’t like
63 10 things to know about Twitter on its 10th anniversary
64 iOS 9.3: Here are the best features you can get right now
65 Former Intel CEO Andy Grove Dies at 79
66 iPhone - Compare Models
67 Intel on Twitter
68 A 10th grader drew this amazing Google Doodle celebrating black culture
69 Andy Grove, Taught Silicon Valley How to Do Business, Dies at 79
70 U.S. asks to cancel Apple encryption hearing, may be able to access device
71 Tim Cook has turned Apple into a political juggernaut
72 New prosthetics helps dog stand tall
73 Things got very naughty when Madonna brought Brienne of Tarth on stage
74 PCMag on Twitter
75 The Best CRM Software of 2016
76 Britney Spears is in hot water over a potentially Photoshopped bikini pic
77 The future of flying robots
78 How Twitter Has Changed: A Retrospective With Early Adopters
79 Now Anyone Can Book An Airbnb In Cuba
80 E! has a live daily newscast on Facebook
81 GreatHorn raises $2.25 million for its young cloud security platform
82 9.7-inch iPro Pro Release Date and Availability
83 Obama says Google has a deal in place to bring Wi-Fi and broadband internet access to Cuba
84 Number of U.S. government 'cyber incidents' jumps in 2015
85 Drake and Rihanna team up for a fan's Make-A-Wish request
86 U.S. Says ‘Outside Party’ Could Unlock Terrorist’s iPhone
87 Apple's Lightning to USB-C cable lets users plug iPhone, iPad into 12-inch MacBook
88 Machines That Will Think and Feel
89 The FBI may be backing out of its case against Apple
90 Boaty McBoatface Could Become Name Of Really Important Research Ship
91 Make people jealous of your lock screen with Windows Spotlight
92 Wall Street is skeptical about Apple's move to ditch Amazon for Google
93 Apple's Classroom app for iPad lands on App Store | Cult of Mac
94 Apple iPad Pro 9.7 specs vs. the original iPad Pro and iPad Air 2 specs
95 Gawker got dealt another huge blow on Monday