Top News
1
Microsoft defends its right to read your email

According to an FBI complaint , Microsoft in 2012 discovered that an ex-employee had leaked proprietary software to an anonymous blogger. Fearing that could empower hackers, Microsoft's lawyers approved emergency "content pulls" of the blogger's accounts to track it down. Company investigators entered the blogger's Hotmail account, then pored over emails and instant messages on Windows Live. The internal investigation led to the arrest on Wednesday of Alex Kibkalo, a former Microsoft employee based in Lebanon.

2
Moto 360 designer: 'we wanted to hit that Whoa! mark'

In a live broadcast, designer Jim Wicks showed off a working version of the Moto 360 smartwatch and offered up a few pieces of information about his prized product and the philosophy behind its design. When asked about the inspiration for the 360's circular design, Wicks mentioned that the shape is an iconic one that people naturally associate with time, as evidenced by the fact that nearly 80 percent of all watches sold globally are circular. "We don't want to make consumers change for this tech," Wicks said. "We want to make this tech map to them. With a square concept you might say 'that's interesting,' but you don't hit that 'Whoa!' mark. We wanted to hit that Whoa! mark." Wicks understands that when it comes to smartwatches, fashion triumphs over functionality -- and with the Moto 360, he believes that it passes the crucial test of being fashionable enough that consumers will want to buy it.

3
Career Rocket Fuel: Whether You're A Millennial Or Eyeing Retirement, Here's What You Really Need To Get Right About Work

If you are like most people, you spend a lot of time stressing about work. Why not re-invest some of this time and effort into periodically thinking about your career strategy and pathway. Do your basic career math. Take inventory of the transportable skills that you have already acquired, and the ones you will need to propel yourself forward. Talk to your bosses, and at least one trusted advisor. Begin to define your sweet spot, and how to evoke your passions. Work out your time portfolio and think about how you are investing your precious time. Is it changing over time? Is it building new skills and relationships? Is it leading you somewhere better in your career?

4
Job Openings in Tech at Priceline, Defy Media and More

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 34 million unique visitors worldwide and 15 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

5
Google Wants Everyone To Stop Hating On Glass | TechCrunch

All social issues aside, Google Glass is an impressive kit of technology. However, that might not be enough to secure its future. The novel PR campaign that is the Google Glass Explorer program seems to be failing. So much so that Google has started firing back at Google Glass haters with a series of pro-Glass factoids.

6
This Twitch Plays Pokemon-themed Flappy Bird clone might make the Internet implode

So if anything you just read hasn't made you question how deep down the rabbit hole we are here, then you're probably safe from the uncontrollable pull of Flappy Bird clones and Twitch Plays Pokemon spinoffs. For the rest of us, Bird Jesus just might be the one clone to draw us back into the mindless lull of bird flying, score earning, and screen tapping that seemingly has no end in sight, neither in-game nor in the collective Web conscious.

7
The NSA has reportedly been spying on Huawei's servers for years

"Many of our targets communicate over Huawei-produced products," the leaked NSA document reportedly says. "We want to make sure that we know how to exploit these products to gain access to networks of interest" — including networks of countries around the world. "The irony is that exactly what they are doing to us is what they have always charged that the Chinese are doing through us," a Huawei US senior executive told the Times . It's just the latest in an ongoing cybersecurity battle between the US and China at large — the  Pentagon said last year that a large number of cyberattacks against US targets appeared to be originating from the Chinese government.

8
Google's lightweight image format makes YouTube pages load 10 percent faster

We all want the internet to be faster, right? Well, Google is hoping to make that happen one YouTube thumbnail at a time. Its leaner WebP image format has been used on the Play store for some time now , and Mountain View's latest venue for the faster-loading files its video service. The outfit says that the switch has resulted in up to 10 percent speedier page-loads, and overall it's shaved tens of terabytes off its internal data transfer rates every day. The Chromium Blog says that this should help lower bandwidth usage for users as it rolls out, and, what's more, that there's a test-version of WebP running in Chrome's beta channel that's faster yet. How much so? It drops image decode speeds by 25 percent. If that means faster access to super hero videos and pictures of lazy dogs , sign us up.

9
The First National Bank of GameStop

Now whenever I get paid I go preorder a whole shitload of games. Whenever I need money, I go to the nearest gamestop and ask for my money back on a game I don't want and make a withdrawal. The lines are shorter at gamestop than at the bank and I can trade in old games and have money go straight to my savings account. Gamestops are just as prevalent as banks in my town and I work at a mall so it's even more convenient than running an errand to the bank or using an ATM and getting charged.

10
Astronaut Gives Amazing Speech On How To Conquer Your Biggest Fears

When you do that, "you have taken the dreams of that 9-year-old boy, which were impossible and dauntingly terrifying, and turned them into practice. And that allows you to come back with an amazing set of experiences and a level of inspiration for other people," he said. TED Here's the whole talk:

11
torvalds/linux

Turn it into (for example): [ 0.073380] x86: Booting SMP configuration: [ 0.074005] .... node #0, CPUs: #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 [ 0.603005] .... node #1, CPUs: #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 [ 1.200005] .... node #2, CPUs: #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 [ 1.796005] .... node #3, CPUs: #24 #25 #26 #27 #28 #29 #30 #31 [ 2.393005] .... node #4, CPUs: #32 #33 #34 #35 #36 #37 #38 #39 [ 2.996005] .... node #5, CPUs: #40 #41 #42 #43 #44 #45 #46 #47 [ 3.600005] .... node #6 , CPUs: #48 #49 #50 #51 #52 #53 #54 #55 [ 4.202005] .... node #7 , CPUs: #56 #57 #58 #59 #60 #61 #62 #63 [ 4.811005] .... node #8 , CPUs: #64 #65 #66 #67 #68 #69 #70 #71 [ 5.421006] .... node #9 , CPUs: #72 #73 #74 #75 #76 #77 #78 #79 [ 6.032005] .... node #10 , CPUs: #80 #81 #82 #83 #84 #85 #86 #87 [ 6.

12
Simple Everyday Tricks that Make You Look Smart

Have you ever used a simple trick to do something clever? You may not always have the required tools or supplies needed to complete a task, but that shouldn’t stop you from doing it. Sometimes, you can use simple everyday tricks like the ones illustrated below to get things done efficiently. Not only will these tricks help you to be more productive, but they’ll make you look smart too.

13
Project Morpheus vs. Oculus Rift: The Coming VR War Will Be Great For The Industry

The Rift and the Morpheus are the two major players of VR, but they’re obviously not going to be the only ones. Lots of third parties will likely try their own hand at making such a device, and other giants like Microsoft could step in the ring as well at some point, if they decide VR is enough of a threat. This will result in a huge amount of competition in the space, and therefore better, cheaper VR units as a result of natural selection. It’s an exciting time for the industry, and I can’t wait for more information regarding price, and of course, release dates.

14
Silicon Valley Can’t Keep Up With Korea’s Financial Revolution

This 66-year old country – still an awkward teenager by global standards – has gained a fearsome reputation for digital excellence. A visitor’s first impression of South Korea is of a country attuned to the potential of technology, both to improve lives and increase efficiency. One of the country’s most impressive feats of innovation is the way it has eschewed cash in favor of a robust digital system called “The T-Money”.

15
Apple's Upcoming Health App Is the Start of Something Huge | Wired Business | Wired.com

According to the 9-to-5 Mac rundown, Apple Healthbook is an incredibly broad undertaking. It’s designed to track your blood sugar, heart rate, breathing rate, weight, hydration, and physical movements. It even tracks health tests. Pundits are already speculating that it will be a key selling point for Apple’s forthcoming iOS 8 mobile operating system or its long-rumored “iWatch” smartwatch or both. We know that Apple has hired fitness guru Jay Blahnik and various engineers with medical sensor experience, which would indicate the company is preparing some sort of wearable health monitoring device.

16
You Can Take Selfies of Your Aorta With This Mini Camera | Wired Design | Wired.com

Though it’s roughly the size of a grain of uncooked quinoa, the images it produces are able to replace two people in the surgical theater. Prior to the invention of this speck-sized sensor, technicians would pore over lower-fidelity cross-sectional images and guide the surgeon verbally while she held the patient’s life in her hands. Degertekin likens his little invention to a flashlight that illuminates the obstructions in a blood vessel, giving doctors a direct look at what they’re up against.

17
How To Write A Follow-Up Email That Will Land You The Job

Transferring this line of thinking to this case, the light bulb that would have gone off in my mind would have been to write a follow-up in the form of a copywritten ad, not just tag lines. In the 'salesperson' scenario above, the latter would be like demonstrating the ability to handle one aspect of the sales process, such as prospecting. But--whatever works is good!

18
The new Oculus Rift costs $350 and this is what it's like

The Oculus Rift has come a long way since we first saw it back in 2012. First there was the HD version, and the next big leap came with the Crystal Cove prototype (which took home our Best of CES 2014 award ). The second development kit takes Crystal Cove and adds several bells and whistles, most notably a custom, in-house camera that faces you while playing to track depth. The IR sensors are now hidden below the front plastic, and a duo of ports (USB 2.0 and a one-eighth-inch audio jack) is just above where your left eye would be if it weren't covered by a VR headset. The audio jack is self explanatory, but the USB enables attachments (think: Leap Motion etc.). Interesting! A power button is on the right side, which is an important change as it also means that the intermediary box between the previous dev kit and the PC powering it is gone. A single wire exits the second Oculus Rift dev kit, which splits to USB for power and HDMI for video. It's not quite the wireless standalone unit we're waiting for, but cutting down on the mess of wires sure doesn't hurt.

19
Elmore Leonard's 10 Simple Rules For Writing

Although not all of these rules apply to all types of writing, they are a reminder of the importance of elevating your writing rather than yourself. This lesson applies not just to fiction writers, but to job applicants, entrepreneurs pitching ideas, or anyone trying to communicate through the written word. And it’s a lesson that is often abandoned when a writer tries to showboat his or her intelligence or makes the mistake of overwhelming the reader with detail.

20
Designing a Recurring Revenue Model Will Help Attract Capital

One of the first things that a venture capitalist looks for in assessing an investment opportunity is the revenue model of the business. More specifically, they are looking for the frequency of that revenue stream, and whether or not it is recurring and easily predictable.

21
Thousands of credit cards used at California DMV may be compromised, says report

The nature of the attack isn't yet clear, but Krebs' sources say that the internal MasterCard notice says that credit card numbers, expiration dates, and three-digit verification codes were compromised. It's not yet known if other sensitive information in the DMV's systems, like driver's license numbers, addresses, phone numbers, and social security numbers were also breached. In addition, the scope of the attack is unknown. If all transactions from that six-month time period were compromised, this could be a major attack affecting millions of charges. In 2012, the California DMV reported that it conducted 11.9 million online transactions.

22
Ubisoft Shows Off The Division's Snowdrop Engine in New Trailer - IGN

Ubisoft has released a new developer diary, detailing the true capabilities of the Snowdrop Engine being used to power upcoming shooter The Division.

23
Understanding How Habits Rule Our Lives

In the past decade, our understanding of the neurology and psychology of habits and the way patterns work within our lives, societies, and organizations has expanded in ways we couldn’t have imagined fifty years ago. We now know why habits emerge, how they change, and the science behind their mechanics. We know how to break them into parts and rebuild them to our specifications. We understand how to make people eat less, exercise more, work more efficiently, and live healthier lives. Transforming a habit isn’t necessarily easy or quick. It isn’t always simple.

24
What do selfies really say about us? - The Next Web

Could it be that most people simply do not like the photos that others take of us? That those photos do not represent us, or our feelings, in a significant way and that shooting a photo of ourselves in our own company gives us a chance to put our genuine face in front of the world? Probably not, but it’s worth a thought because selfies aren’t going anywhere soon.

25
How to lock in another year of Amazon Prime at $79

This morning Amazon announced the price for its Prime service is going up $20 per year to $99. The price increase isn't a lot of money, considering what you get with the service, and most people (judging from Twitter, at least) won't take issue with the increase. At the end of the day, Amazon Prime at $99 can still be a tremendous value. Rick Broida has a breakdown of what you're getting for your money in his post, " Amazon Prime: Still a good deal at $99? "

26
Why The ROI of Online Community Doesn't Matter

Even at my most introverted hours, I still want to feel connected and that people like me are within reach. Likewise, within every single person is a deep desire to connect with other people who are like them. Meaning people who share a common set of values, interests, and have a mutual investment in each other — the three elements that shape the core of every single community. The ability to easily find other people like us online is good, and it makes us feel less alone. These relationships make us happy.

27
How to Overcome The 6 Most Toxic Employee Behaviors

This is funny. I have a job with a major retailer. I enjoy my job, and I definitely appreciate it in this economy. I used to have a toxic personality (which stemmed from frustration from the job and was just a general negative attitude) but have had to deal with even worse personalities on the job. I've witnessed and had to endure a couple of people who are the epitamy of "workplace bully" and nothing was ever done about it. If you work in this type of environment, you know first hand the reason why these people manage to keep their jobs is because of "they lack the talent management skills to deal with the behavior effectively." They really would rather just sweep it under the rug to avoid conflict and keep their friends. Thankfully, one of the main culprits (who got promoted, mind you) finally left for a better job and the other one learned the err of her ways and has been 100% more pleasant to be around for everyone on the shift. Unfortunately, for a lot of companies or franchises, things don't always work out that way. I wish there was a way to help fix this but none of the managers want to deal with that B.

28
Google Glasses And Pebble Watches For Investors

The reason: It costs money to get in and out of stocks. Costs include brokerage commissions, bid/ask spreads and the tendency of buy and sell orders to push the price away. If you want to unload a large position, the middleman on the other side of the trade will quote a low price. He or she needs to be compensated for the risk of holding the shares until he can in turn dispose of them.

29
Quirky Aros Smart Window Air Conditioner

Those products are intriguing, but they only really appeal to consumers with an especially pointed interest in early adoption of smart home gadgetry. Aros, on the other hand, promises to appeal to anyone who needs a good window air conditioner -- a number that figures to be significantly higher than the number of consumers on the market for a smart egg tray. The fact that Aros is set to retail for a very reasonable-sounding $300 should only help broaden that appeal even further.

30
3D Printing in the Home: 1 In 3 Americans Ready For 3D Printer

All of these additional insights make the report more useful, and arguably, more accurate as a reading on consumer purchase intent. Age and location also influenced consumer interest in wanting a 3D printer for the home. Millennials, those between the ages of 18 and 24, were more likely to state they wanted to buy a 3D printer. I would not have expected to see a specific regional interest, but the report found strong interest for 3D printing in the Southeast U.S., with Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, and Tennessee most likely to buy a 3D printer in 2014.

31
The creator of 'Second Life' wants to look inside your brain with the Oculus Rift

Rosedale demonstrated the "glass brain" system at SXSW earlier this month with the help of his wife. Flashes of light helped pinpoint her brain activity (based on the EEG data) and Rosedale was able to journey through her brain while wearing a Rift VR headset. "I put my hand on her side and squeezed, and you could see the motor cortex activity lighting up all of a sudden," he told Fast Company . The system helps visualize EEG signals as they travel in pulses between regions of the transparent "glass" brain. Rosedale's company, High Frequency, is currently working to create a new virtual world after his enormously successful first try. And he seems to think the science project — which was primarily the work of scientists at UCSD and UCSF — could help in that mission. "We’re trying to identify which critical factors can most help people feel like they’re face to face," he said.

32
Eclipse TD-M1: Possibly The World's Most Exclusive Computer Speakers

These compact and rather futuristic-looking speakers claim to offer world-class audio accuracy thanks to a rather unusual construction. The speakers are housed in an ovoid or egg-shaped casing that is the signature of the entire Eclipse speaker range. The oval shape has been especially chosen to suppress internal standing waves and minimise the diffraction effect that occurs through the front baffle of a speaker. The high-efficiency driver is suspended within an ovoid casing and is isolated from its casing in order to give it an uncoloured sound. How uncoloured? Well, I was fairly sceptical at the idea of a pair of speakers costing the best part of a thousand pounds for computer or bookshelf use. And then I listened to a range of music streamed at 192kHz/24-bits and I’m still reeling from the experience.

33
Text yourself thin with ToneFone weighted iPhone case

It's genius! I mean, when you're chatting on the phone, there's nothing better than cradling several pounds between your head and shoulder. Sure, you'll need to invest in some reinforced cargo pants so you can take your phone with you, but that's what those big pockets are for, right? And let's just see a thief try to make off with your iPhone now!

34
From space suits to sci-fi suburbia: the future, in photos

"When I was a kid, I thought there were going to be giant robots in the future. But no matter how long I waited, people were only able to make small robots, like Asimo. Eventually, I thought ‘I can’t wait anymore,’ and set out to make one myself." Kogoro Kurata is the designer and blacksmith behind the gargantuan 4-ton mech standing in front of me. Named after its creator, Kuratas is the product of nearly three years of forging, hammering, and coding. The robot’s expressionless face...

35
How Your Tweets Reveal Your Home Location | MIT Technology Review

But the absence of geotagging data does not mean your location is secret. Today, Jalal Mahmud and a couple of pals at IBM Research in Almaden, California, say they’ve developed an algorithm that can analyse anybody’s last 200 tweets and determine their home city location with an accuracy of almost 70 per cent.

36
At TED, Bill Gates Talks About Spending Warren Buffett's Billions

I've been covering the business of news, information and entertainment in one form or another for more than 10 years. In February 2014, I moved to San Francisco to cover the tech beat. My primary focus is social media and digital media, but I'm interested in other aspects, including but not limited to the sharing economy, lifehacking, fitness & sports tech and the evolving culture of the Bay Area. In past incarnations I've worked at AOL, Conde Nast Portfolio, Radar and WWD. Circle me on Google+ , follow me on Twitter or send me tips or ideas at jbercovici@forbes.com.

37
Alan Turing Theory Validated 60 Years After His Death

This photo montage depicts morphogenesis from an initial homogeneous state (upper left, same volume and color) through a heterogeneous state (center, same volume but different colors) and into a chemo-physical heterogeneous state (lower right, different volumes and colors). This cellular differentiation takes place exactly as Alan Turing predicted it would in his 1952 paper "The Chemical Basis of Morphogenesis.'

38
11 Amazing Tattoo Designs From 1870 To Today

Over time, tattoos have served purposes as varied as camouflaging hunters, marking victory in battle, memorializing the dead, telling the wearer's life story, and symbolizing just how goddamn tough you are. “The tattoo is a form of non-verbal communication,” writes Schiffmacher, who has tattooed the likes of Kurt Cobain and Anthony Kiedis. “This is just as true for the so-called primitive cultures as it is for the supposedly civilized world.”

39 At last: Office comes to iPad, a sure sign that the times are changing at Microsoft

All of this MS Office software was not only not instantly dominant as myth and history re-writes would have it, it was largely very buggy, feature lacking and poor substitutes for the alternatives. MS used its dominant position owning the Windows Operating System ruthlessly and illegally to literally break everyone else’s software with each update, until users were forced often kicking and screaming all the way to adopt the poor substitutes offered by MS (which at least didn’t break for weeks at a time with each new windows update.

40
The 1 Habit That's Killing Your Online Dating Game

That being said, Hinge founder Justin McLeod isn't especially surprised by the data. "Statistically, college graduates smoke less than the general population (11% vs 20% respectively)," he told The Huffington Post over email. "With 99% of Hinge's users being college-educated, we'd anticipate that non-smokers are more likely to be attracted to fellow nonsmokers."

41
Smartwatches: Eat your heart out, Dick Tracy!

It was ALL IN THE WRIST when comic strip artist Chester Gould first outfitted Dick Tracy with that two-way radio-watch back in 1946. And it's still all in the wrist today, as manufacturers try to dazzle us with new gadgets. Yahoo tech columnist David Pogue takes their measure:

42
I'm Sorry, The Windows 8 Hate Just Doesn't Make Sense

Change is hard. I get it. People are comfortable with the status quo, and reluctant to embrace things that are new or different. There is absolutely no doubt that Windows 8 represents the single most dramatic overhaul of the Windows user interface in the history of the operating system, but the backlash seems either orchestrated, or misguided, or both.

43
On being wrong

Most of us will do anything to avoid being wrong. But what if we're wrong about that? "Wrongologist" Kathryn Schulz makes a compelling case for not just admitting but embracing our fallibility.

44
Watch a Motorcycle Helmet Become a Pinstriped Masterpiece in Minutes

Pinstriping is an old school hot rod style that's become an art form all its own. At an event hosted by Bell Helmets, we got to watch master striper Skratch crank out eye popping custom-painted motorcycle helmets with nothing more than a brush, a rock-steady hand, and a laser-precise eye.

45
Apple Loop: The Brand New iPhone 5c, The Returning iPad, Jonathan Ive Profiled, The 2048 Game

I'm known for my strong views on mobile technology, online media, and the effect this has on and communication will have on the public conscious and existing businesses. I've been following this space for over ten years, working with a number of publishers, publications and media companies, some for long periods of time, others for commissions, one-off pieces or a series of articles or shows. As Scotland’s first podcaster, I continue to be a prominent voice in the rise of podcasting and new media online, and picked up a British Academy (BAFTA) nomination for my annual coverage of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, alongside contributions to Radio 5 Live, the BBC World Service, presenting Edinburgh local radio's coverage of the General Election. You'll find me on Twitter ( @Ewan ), Facebook , and Google Plus .

46
Dancing with the 'Star Wars': Billy Dee Williams cha-chas as Lando

"Star Wars" actor Billy Dee Williams dressed as Lando Calrissian pays tribute to a galaxy far, far away with a cha-cha number that even has Ewoks cheering on "Dancing with the Stars."

47
Statoil | Partner Webcast | MIT Technology Review

Jonathan Matthews is Vice President of Statoil Canada’s Heavy Oil Technology Centre (HOTC) and is located in Calgary. The primary focus of the HOTC is on delivering innovative technologies that will help make Statoil’s Kai Kos Dehseh Oil Sands Partnership (KOSP) profitable while supporting continuous environmental performance objectives. Prior to joining Statoil, Jonathan spent 20 years working in the Canadian Oil Sands with Shell Canada and Syncrude Canada in various technical and leadership roles. Jonathan graduated from the University of Waterloo with a Geological Engineering degree and a Master's of Science. He is a member of the Association for Professional Engineers, Geoscientists of Alberta (APEGA) and has provided leadership to various initiatives in the Canadian oil sands.

48
Graphene-Copper Wires for Cooler Computing | MIT Technology Review

Jonathan Candelaria , director of interconnect research at the Semiconductor Research Corporation, an industry consortium in Durham, North Carolina, says that adding more transistors doesn’t improve performance the way it used to. The solution may again turn out to be adopting fundamentally different architectures. New ways of designing and packaging chips could help solve the heat problem, says Candelaria, and this will give the industry time to work out problems with new materials, perhaps including the new graphene-copper hybrids.

49
The 10 Most-Pirated Movies

Copyright infringers never lack for fresh material to duplicate and distribute to the non-paying Internet audience. In fact, one of the movies is a direct-to-video release that hasn't even hit retail outlets. Movie bootlegging is so commonplace that the MPAA (Motion Picture Association of America) has stated that this illegal copying and distributing results in a Hollywood loss of roughly $20 billion dollars per year. Although some have debated the legitimacy of that number, many analysts agree that there's quite a bit of illegal downloading and streaming happening online.

50
Turkey Moves To Block Twitter At The IP Level | TechCrunch

Twitter is an online social network and a microblogging service that enables users to send and read “tweets,” which are text messages limited to 140 characters. Registered users of Twitter are able to read and post tweets via the web, SMS or mobile applications. Created in March 2006, Twitter is a global real-time communications platform with 400 million monthly visitors to twitter.com and more …

51 Can You Sue A Robot For Defamation?
52 This Is How the NSA Is Trying to Win Over the Media
53 Bitcoin Exchange Vircurex Battles Insolvency
54 People Who Use E-Readers Dive Far Deeper Into Books | Underwire | Wired.com
55 The Free Marketing Gravy Train Is Over on Facebook | TIME
56 Is High-End Audio Worth It?
57 LG G Watch to launch next quarter with Android Wear
58 Sony shows (and tells) us why 4K on a phone isn't crazy
59 California to get its first Bitcoin ATM Thursday
60 DRONES: Commercial Drones Are Becoming A Reality, With Huge Impacts For Many Industries
61 Intel Unveils 2014 Roadmap: 4 Fantastic New Processors For PC Enthusiasts
62 GDC: Sony Project Morpheus VR Headset for PS4 Hands-on - IGN
63 Technology: The $1,000 genome
64 Turkey Blocks Google DNS, YouTube Could Be Next | TechCrunch
65 Sony Still Struggling With Massive PS4 Demand
66 The Short, Serendipitous Life & Untimely Death Of Antisocial Photo-Sharing App, Rando | TechCrunch
67 How Over-Reliance on LinkedIn Can Lead to Hiring Pitfalls
68 The New Phone Giants: Indian And Chinese Manufacturers' Fast Rise To Threaten Apple And Samsung
69 Why Google Flu Is A Failure
70 Ex-Microsoft employee arrested, accused of stealing Windows RT, product activation secrets
71 Be your own light show in app-controlled CuteCircuit clubwear
72 Resistance Is Futile, You Will Be Assimilated Into Windows 8 Eventually
73 Seth Rogen and James Franco Recreate Kimye's 'Vogue' Cover
74 This 300-Foot Water Slide Is A New Way To Commute To Work
75 Why Google Flu Is A Failure
76 On your permanent record
77 Fly Or Die: Whisper | TechCrunch
78 What if Netflix switched to P2P for video streaming?
79 Paul Maritz says the internet of things has convinced even giants like GE they need to radically shift direction
80 Steve Jobs quote app rejected by Apple, report says
81 10 Strategies to Get More Smartphone Sales
82 The sexy era of big data is over as VCs turn to fund unexpected industries
83 Tabata & the Quick 4 Minute Workout
84 The Next Big Health App Needs to Do More Than Just Track Our Numbers | Gadget Lab | Wired.com
85 Why Facebook, eBay Measure Power And Water Consumption In Their Data Centers
86 PonoPlayer
87 Asus ROG G750JZ-XS72
88 Exploring virtual reality on PlayStation 4 with Shuhei Yoshida and Richard Marks (video)
89 Batman: Arkham Knight Screens Reveal Riddler, Penguin and Two-Face - IGN
90 Turner Sports Reinvents How Fans Watch March Madness
91 GDC: Controlling Infamous: Second Son With Your Eyes - IGN
92 Fitbit Now Faces a Class-Action Suit in Rash Fallout - Digits - WSJ
93 California DMV Investigates Potential Large-Scale Data Breach
94 http://www.shipwire.com/
95 Buying Tesla Means Paying For Everything You See And Some Things You Can't
96 Valve's Social Engineering Campaign Against Cheaters is Out of Bounds
97 Virtual Reality Will Come To Define Sony's PS4
98 Citi'sVoice: How One Company Created Healthy School Meals That Follow Students Home
99 Want To Become A Digital Enterprise? Cloud Computing Is One Place To Start
100 Now There's A Davos Of Education And A $1 Million 'Nobel Prize' For Teachers