Top News
1
Made in the Future

Made in the Future is an effort to capture our musings about what a not-so-distant tomorrow might look like. Our tools—faster, cheaper, and more out of control than ever—have triggered seismic shifts in how we design, manufacture, and distribute. And that has us asking lots of questions: What new tools or technologies will we create? How will they change the way we behave and learn? How will they shape our world?

2
Horseplayers: A Hard Race To Lose

Christian Hellmers and Peter Rotondo, Jr. team up for the last race of the Saratoga Racetrack tournament, but their chance at winning $100,000 dissipates right at the finish line.

3
Dating Startup Crowdfunds Cross-Country Flights for Singles

The goal of both campaigns is to raise $10,000 over the next eight days. If they do, the Dating Ring will fly a plane full of single women to San Francisco and a plane full of single men to New York City for a weekend of parties and dates, specially curated by Dating Ring's matchmakers.

4
Channel 4 to broadcast footage of 9/11 New York attacks filmed from space

The footage, in which a huge plume of smoke is seen stretching from the site of the devastated World Trade Centre towers, was captured from the International Space Station by astronaut Frank Culbertson.

5
My DNA vending machine

Vending machines generally offer up sodas, candy bars and chips. Not so for the one created by TED Fellow Gabe Barcia-Colombo. This artist has dreamed up a DNA Vending Machine, which dispenses extracted human DNA, packaged in a vial along with a collectible photo of the person who gave it. It’s charming and quirky, but points out larger ethical issues that will arise as access to biotechnology increases.

6 DigitalOcean Raises $37.2M From Andreessen Horowitz To Take On AWS | TechCrunch

Cloud hosting company DigitalOcean raised a Series A round of $37.2 million at a $153 million valuation led by Andreessen Horowitz. Previous investors IA Ventures and CrunchFund also participated, but Andreessen Horowitz is by far the largest investor in this round — and Peter Levine will join the board. Previously, the company had raised $3.2 million.

7
This Gigantic 3-D Printer Can Create an Entire Table | Wired Design | Wired.com

BigRep does have drawbacks and Oehmigen suggests that operators monitor their print’s progress and adjust the machine’s settings in real time to prevent errors and to better control the surface finish. “We actually want a new profession to take hold, called the ’3-D Manufacturer,’ and create a lot of jobs, instead of doom thinking about how all jobs are lost to robots,” he says. “Machines are not as perfect as we think they are, they need care from us humans, and that’s a good thing.”

8
Why Copyrighted Coffee May Cripple the Internet of Things | Wired Business | Wired.com

Limiting the interoperability of the Internet of Things could also restrict systems far less trivial than coffee or kitchen appliances; it might have the greatest impact on infrastructure, in important questions that get decided far from the eyes of everyday consumers. As Kominers points out, hospitals are starting to benefit from interconnected sensors, which are finding their way into everything from medication dispensers to doctors’ pens to even (though monitoring devices) the patients themselves. One might hope that hospitals would ensure interoperability within their own internal systems. But without open standards, one hospital’s “Intranet of Things” might not be able to talk to another hospital’s network, causing much usable data to be lost.

9
The Satoshi Paradox

I’ll also observe that the coincidences Newsweek found, could be found by almost any conspiracy theorist worth his paranoia. And on the other side (more importantly, methinks), it seems you ascribe your personally-only-sensible motivations to a man who wanted to change the world in a radical way. And not to himself become a plutocrat, so his choice to dissociate from the Andreesens and Winklevii, who, to some eyes are looking for banker-scale wealth, would fit right in with the narrative of his being a modest man espousing old-fashioned values, especially regards integrity. (This also would make totally irrelevant the fact that Nakamoto had financial challenges well before Bitcoin started, because his personal situation obviously had changed thereafter, even if his view of banks and authorities had not.)

10
Mansory’s 1600-hp Lamborghini Aventador Carbonado GT sets new standard for fast

The Lamborghini Aventador is something that is on every motoring enthusiast’s wishlist – don’t pretend like it’s not. Awesome as the supercar is, Mansory has managed to make it even more so with the car’s upcoming unveil at the Geneva Motor Show this week.

11
10 Foolproof Tips for a Killer Parody

Now, exactly 20 years later, Weird Al Yankovic has sold more than 12 million albums, late night comedy shows are airing celebrity-packed musical spoofs five nights a week and YouTube parodies rack up thousands of views daily. And judging by the Internet's love for satirical content, parody songs aren't fizzling out anytime soon. So we're here to help.

12
Facebook's News Feed redesign is for real this time | TechHive

But everything else is the same. Facebook isn’t changing its News Feed algorithm or making the site different in any way. When it tried to roll out a new look last year, Facebook found that people didn’t want Facebook to change much. Bigger photos, slightly different fonts, sure. A jarring black sidebar that seemed more at home on mobile than the Web? Not so much.

13
12 Ways to Get Your Business Dev and Tech Teams on the Same Page

Business development teams want to make a sale, and often, they push the tech team to do something that isn’t in the schedule. Forcing the tech team to switch direction regularly causes more disruption and delays than if the tech team were to proceed and build as they originally planned. Tech teams also need to understand that without business development, there is no revenue to pay their salaries. - Alex Friedman , Ruckus

14
What Glaciovolcanoes Can Tell Us About Past Ice Ages

In western Canada, where scores of volcanoes erupted in the past millennia, geoscientists are quilting together the past thickness of the North American ice sheet with lava, and linking it to ocean cores. For example, ocean cores are often correlated by changes in oxygen isotopes (atoms with different numbers of neutrons) in ocean sediments. Edwards can now point to a volcano in British Columbia and say the ice on land was at least 985 feet thick during a certain marine isotope stage that corresponds to a cold Earth.

15
How Fox, Seth MacFarlane and Neil deGrasse Tyson Are Making Science Cool

The man who never met a toilet or sex joke he didn’t like is deeply concerned that the U.S. has lost its passion for science. No one seems to care about the space program. Evolution has somehow become a debatable fact. “The resistance to science is idiotic,” says MacFarlane, sipping on a coffee that he declares way too fancy. “Those people shouldn’t be allowed to have antibiotics. Give us back your TVs and the dentures.” But MacFarlane is serious, putting his money and his clout with Fox, where his mouth is. Fox plans to air a reboot of the 1980s PBS science show Cosmos , one of the most popular and least hip programs ever made. MacFarlane is also spending his money to help get late Cosmos host Carl Sagan’s substantial collections of letters, notes and drawings into the Library of Congress. “I never met Carl Sagan, but this is my way to give something back to him for all of the things he gave to me,” says MacFarlane.

16
25 B2B Marketing Automation Thought Leaders to Follow on Twitter

I had just stepped off the stage at Dreamforce 2013 when I was asked by an audience member, "Who are other thought leaders I should follow in the marketing automation industry?" I had a very hard time giving her names because marketing automation is made up of so many differing tactics, all of which have their own thought leaders. Without knowing which areas she wanted to know more about, I couldn't pinpoint the one person she should follow to help her obtain the knowledge she wanted. This question quickly helped me realize that people currently consider marketing automation to be a singular tactic, when in reality it is a combination of many tactics. And to be proficient at marketing automation, you must be proficient at these underlying tactics.

17
Marc Benioff challenges Bay Area's tech leaders to give more

Along with Google's recent pledge to give $6.8 million to fund two years of Muni rides for working-class youths, the challenge is the latest example of how some tech players are heeding public and private pressure to give back. City leaders hope SF Gives is a crystallizing moment for a new generation of philanthropists - something like a 21st century incarnation of longtime cultural patron and investor Warren Hellman .

18
Yahoo: Destroyer Of Startups

The marriage of mobile and contextual search is still in its honeymoon phase—there are plenty of big ideas, but relatively few solid executions. If Yahoo does indeed capitalize on bridging its mobile services with contextual search, you can bet it will be a direct result of one of the many companies it has picked up in the last two years—bringing the technology, and recognition that went along with it, in house. 

19
A Super-Sized Cocoon Made of Packing Tape That You Can Curl Up In | Wired Design | Wired.com

Numen/For Use has made more than a dozen of these tape structures throughout the years years, but the idea was originally meant for a totally different purpose. The studio, which does its fair share of theatre design, was working with a ballet to create an interactive set when they came up with the idea of evolving scenery. “We put a lot of sticks on stage and the dancers were meant to take tape in their hands and dance through this forest of pillars and leave their trace,” Katzler explains. During each night’s performance, the dancers would add another layer to the tape structure, tracing the outline like you would a doodle during algebra.

20
New 'Sphero 2B' Robot Will Outrun You

This year Orbotix will launch a new, faster (14 feet per second), longer running, more agile (and more cost effective) Sphero currently code-named Sphero 2B . This takes the concept from a ball to a tube that can have different tires fitted and offers a more speed focused exuberant “robot”.

21
The World's Most Insane Air Race Has Finally Returned | Autopia | Wired.com

After a four-year hold, the Red Bull Air Race is back on tour starting in Abu Dhabi, with pilots hitting 200 mph at less than 70 feet above the Persian Gulf.

22
Our Obsession With Online Quizzes Comes From Fear, Not Narcissism | Underwire | Wired.com

Of course, by now, the number of these quizzes you’ve taken, shared, and seen from your Facebook friends might seem to have faded. Even the jokes (“Which Soul-Crushing, Existential Waste of Time on the Internet Are You?”) are getting stale. But tens of millions of us keep taking these quizzes (Buzzfeed’s “What City Should You Live In?” has amassed more than 20 million unique visitors), and the quizzes keep getting made, and keep making gobs of money for the folks producing them. While this recent surge likely will be a cyclical thing that eventually dies, as it did with the waning of the Livejournal, they’re not a real problem, as some hand-wringers have suggested . And it’s not narcissism that birthed them, either.

23
Getty Gives Bloggers Free Access To 35 Million Images

Using a new embed tool, users can from today drop an image into their blog or social media feed, where it appears with a footer crediting Getty and linking to the company’s licensing page.

24
Nintendo Is Beating Microsoft In Video Game Hardware Sales

Are you kidding me? So now these PS4 fanboys have stooped to just straight up lying in their headlines. The headline is that Nintendo sold more than Microsoft, then the article straight up tells you that they didn’t sell more latest generation consoles but if you add up every device Nintendo sells then they sold more units than the Xbox One! Of course if you wanted to add up every device that Nintendo sells versus Microsoft then you would have to include Windows phones or tablets because of adding the 3DS into that equation but of course he didn’t. Forbes should be ashamed of themselves for posting this very obvious lie. Which BTW I checked the actual sales figures and the Xbox 360 sold way more units than what he is showing here.

25
Elon Musk: It's "Embarrassing That The United States Has To Thumb Rides From The Russians"

The current crisis in Ukraine has left some people wondering about what an escalation of tensions between the United States and Russia could mean for the International Space Station. That’s especially true since the United States has been relying on Russian Soyuz missions to carry its astronauts to and from the station since 2011.

26
Of Bitcoin and doxxing: Is revealing Satoshi Nakamoto's identity okay because it was Newsweek and not Reddit?

Newsweek has identified a man it believes is the creator of Bitcoin, Satoshi Nakamoto, and published details about his personal life. How is this different from what Reddit users and others have been widely criticized for doing with the Boston bombers?

27
20 Things We Learned From Martha Stewart's Sassy AMA

is the largest independent online news site dedicated to covering digital culture, social media and technology. With more than 20 million unique monthly visitors, Mashable has one of the most engaged online news communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

28
The Always Up-to-Date Guide to Building a Hackintosh (OS X 10.9.2)

When Apple builds their official Macs, their parts are not that different from the parts we can buy online when we build our own PCs. In fact, some are often the same. Additionally, third-party manufacturers will create hardware for Apple's Mac Pro computers to add additional options to the mix. This means that Apple, or the third parties, need to create software drivers for Mac OS X in order for the hardware to work. This means that virtually any hardware with these drivers is going to be hardware you can use in your hackintosh build. Additionally, the talented people on the internet have developed their own open source drivers for non-Mac hardware in order to provide additional options for your hackintosh. While all of these efforts only span a small percentage of the available hardware on the market, it still provides you with a lot of great choices. Many motherboards, graphics cards, and processors are compatible thanks to these combined efforts.

29
Gadgets Like Fitbit Are Remaking How Doctors Treat You | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com

Dr. Eric Topol, a cardiologist at the Scripps Clinic in San Diego, knows when his patients’ hearts are racing or their blood pressure is on the rise, even if they’re sitting at home. With high-risk patients hooked up to “personal …

30
What are New York and San Francisco Tweeting About?

New Yorkers are always complaining about the weather, while San Franciscans tend to moan about the city's perpetually poor MUNI bus service. That's not just a stereotype — it turns out there's hard, Twitter -based evidence for it.

31
British Energy Company's Gassy PSA Is Fracking Hilarious [VIDEO]

Oddly enough, the correlation between fracking and farting makes a lot of sense. Alternative energy company Ecotricity promises frack-free, clean forms of energy, and encourages consumers to reject fracked gas. The small British company decided to take a strong stand against the controversial process of fracking with this unexpectedly humorous PSA.

32
“Real” Satoshi Claims He Is Not Dorian Nakamoto | TechCrunch

Dorian S. Nakamoto is probably having the weirdest day of his life. In less than 24 hours, the Temple City, California resident has been the subject of a Newsweek cover article “outing” him as the elusive creator of Bitcoin, has denied his involvement with the cryptocurrency, and has literally been  chased around Los Angeles by a pack of rabid journalists.

33
The Decline of Rural America, Captured in Replicas of Decaying Homes | Raw File | Wired.com

In her series Broken Houses, Ofra Lapid uses printed photos and other materials to create replicas of the slumping farmhouses and other abandoned structures that dot the American landscape.

34
Researchers 3D Print Blood Vessels Into Tissue for Artificial Organs

The smallest channels printed were about 75 micrometers in diameter, which is much larger than the tiny capillaries that exchange nutrients and waste throughout the body. The hope is that the 3D printing method will set the overall architecture of blood vessels within artificial tissue and then smaller blood vessels will develop along with the rest of the tissue. "We view this as a method to print the larger vessels; then we want to harness biology to do the rest of the work," says Lewis.

35
Apple 41.6% in US Smartphones, Samsung 26.7%, Android Down, iOS Up

Apple’s dominance as the top smartphone OEM in the US has started off strong in the first month of this year: 41.6 percent share. Samsung is once again gaining share faster than its main competitor, however, hitting a new high at 26.7 percent. Rounding out the top five were LG, Motorola, and HTC.

36
Of Bitcoin and doxxing: Is revealing Satoshi Nakamoto's identity okay because it was Newsweek and not Reddit?

Newsweek has identified a man it believes is the creator of Bitcoin, Satoshi Nakamoto, and published details about his personal life. How is this different from what Reddit users and others have been widely criticized for doing with the Boston bombers?

37
World's Most Advanced Diving Suit Could Lead to a Cure for Cancer

The 12-person team of researchers this summer will use the Exosuit to explore an area called the Canyons, an underwater gully, about 100 miles off the coast of New England, that drops down to more than 10,000 feet at its deepest point. The suit will allow divers to conduct studies at 1,000 feet underwater — an area, referred to as the mid-water or mesopelagic zone, where many bioluminescent animals migrate after nightfall.

38
The Mac Beta of F.lux Now Adjusts To Your Actual Day

The Mac version is still in beta, but it has just been updated with a load of new features. What’s most useful is that F.lux now adjusts to your actual day, and not just sunrise and sunset. All you have to do is tell F.lux when you wake up, and the new version of the program makes a schedule tailored to you, so you can use a screen that knows when you wake up and go to sleep, as well as when the sun is up.

39
Samsung Jumps Into Internet Radio Race With Milk Music

Similar to how you would use an old radio dial to find stations, Milk Music lets you to move your finger over the touchscreen to tune between the stations. You can choose from about 200 curated stations — everything from pop hits ('80s, '90s, etc.) to jazz. You can star songs you like, add them to playlists and pick stations based on artists. A nice perk is that you don't have to sign up for an account or even log in via a social network to gain access.

40
No-hio State: Michigan Alum Excludes Buckeyes From Social Network

The founding team believes that excluding one university from an otherwise open "college only" app won't impact their ultimate goal of creating the next big social network. Investors don't seem to mind either. Blend closed its first funding round on Wednesday, a $2.7 million round led by New Enterprise Associates (NEA) that included a handful of other investors like Trinity Ventures and Foundation Capital.

41
The Untold Story Behind Mark Zuckerberg's SXSW Keynote Debacle

Sarah Lacy [to Gallaga in the video]: The sad thing is a core group of people in the back of the room got so angry that they probably ruined SXSW for getting people that high-profile again, which is a little unfortunate. But a lot of people say they got a lot out of it, and, frankly, we broke a lot of news. . . . I’m one of the only women reporting in tech. I get this constantly and guess what? I’m still employed. So obviously some people enjoy what I do. It’s happened before. I’ve had way worse shit written about me on a massive scale and it blows over. It’s the reality of living in this realm and it’s the price of being high-profile, unfortunately. Not to understate it because most people who do it don’t realize how it hurts when you publicly attack someone who is, frankly, trying to do their job. Honestly, I felt great about how it went. I asked him a range of things. There’s a huge number of constituencies when you talk about someone like Mark. Mainstream press expects you to break news. People in the room want to hear stuff. I think we touched on a number of things, and I’d like to see someone else try it.

42
Japan Government: 'Bitcoin Isn't a Currency'

Bitcoin took a further step away from legitimacy Friday when Japan's cabinet approved a document saying the popular cryptocurrency is not, in fact, a currency and banks should not provide it as a product to customers.

43
The Long Game: Billionaires Who've Stuck It Out

I began my career in journalism in 2008 with a quick stint at the United Nations office in Geneva, Switzerland, where I wrote about topics ranging from trade and development to nuclear nonproliferation to Swiss flea markets. Later that year I began working as a stringer for the Chicago Tribune, covering the small towns of northern Illinois—including the one where I grew up— as they weathered the municipal impact of the worsening recession. My work has appeared in the Chicago Daily Herald, National Geographic Intelligent Travel, and Inc.com. Currently, I am interning at Forbes and pursuing a master’s degree from NYU in Business and Economic Reporting. Find me on Twitter @KathrynDill.

44
The World's Best Sustainability Ideas

Katerva , a five-year-old nonprofit set up to recognize and support stand-out sustainability efforts around the world, has announced its third-annual awards in a competition that has been described as a kind of Nobel Prize in the broad and somewhat amorphous field of sustainability. Among this year’s eclectic choices: a Brazilian business that produces solar-powered hearing aids, a Berkeley, CA nonprofit that delivers solar-powered lighting kits to off-the-grid maternity clinics and a British nonprofit that has designed a dirt-cheap refrigerator made out of a clay pot.

45
Social Marketing Habits of Highly Effective People

Chances are, people are already talking about your brand. Be sure to search for relevant terms and hash tags that might be associated with your company. This will help you understand what is being said – and how your business is being received – through channels that you might not otherwise be aware of.  You can learn from the conversation and even join in if you feel it will help you connect with a new faction of potential customers.

46
Social Media Demographics: The Surprising Identity Of Each Major Social Network

In a recent report from BI Intelligence , we break down the demographics of each major social media platform to help brands and businesses decide which networks they should prioritize. Being able to identify the demographics of social media audiences at a granular level is the basis for all targeted marketing and messaging. The report also spotlights the opportunities that lie ahead for each social network, how demographics affect usage patterns, and why some platforms are better for brands than others. 

47
Comic Artist Raises $50K for Books, Then Just Burns Them

A comic artist in Chicago who raised over $50,000 on Kickstarter to publish and ship hardback books has decided to torch the product for which donors paid.

48
The Great He-Said, She-Said Game of the True Bitcoin Creator

Dorian is a libertarian, a mathematician and an engineer — a "brilliant" one, according to his brother, but also an "asshole." Dorian is wary of the government — when playing with his daughter, he would tell her to "pretend the government agencies are coming after you" — and was frustrated with the hassle of sending money across borders. Finally, his age (64) could explain his old-fashioned coding style, Goodman argues.

49
How to Find Your Passion: The Benefits of Business Experiments

A lot of people wonder how they are going to find their passion. It’s hard to find it by just reading books, Web articles, and talking to friends. My experience has been that over the course of a few years, you can try out a few experiments, and you’ll start to get closer to something that really resonates with you.

50
The 100 Books to Read Before You Die According to Amazon

What makes this list interesting is that it spans decades, continents, and a range between fiction and non-fiction work. The oldest book on the list, Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, was published in 1813. Kate Atkinson’s Life after Life, published in 2013, was the most recent on the list. The Amazon Books editorial team plans to regularly audit the list to ensure the list’s cultural relevance.

51 Commercial Drones Are Completely Legal, a Federal Judge Ruled
52 Ellen's Oscars Selfie Gets LEGO-Fied
53 Oops! Windows 8.1 Update Leaked By Microsoft Itself
54 After Car Chase, Alleged Bitcoin Creator Denies Link to Currency | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com
55 The Case For Learning To Code
56 Surveillance by Algorithm
57 Oscar Mayer's Bacon-Scented iPhone Alarm Ready for Testing
58 The 10 Most Popular Mobile Messaging Apps In The World
59 How to Make a Microscope Out of Paper in 10 Minutes - Wired Science
60 TOO MANY ZOOZ rocks Union Square.
61 The Creep Factor: How To Think About Big Data And Privacy
62 Microsoft makes it official: We're all in with Android
63 There's No Real Difference Between Online Espionage and Online Attack
64 QuizUp for Android Launches
65 BlackBerry Changes Approval Date for BlackBerry 10 App Incentives
66 India: The Elephant in the Room for Mobile Developers?
67 Associate Editor, How-to & Tips
68 Silicon Valley meets Napa Valley in the wine-making Miracle Machine
69 Jawbone's Up Coffee: A Health And Fitness App That Tells You When You're Overcaffeinated
70 Twitter bans porn videos on Vine
71 The NSA Has An Advice Columnist. Seriously. - The Intercept
72 Zite CEO Mark Johnson: 'Honestly, The Sooner Zite Goes Away, The Better'
73 The Real Reason Facebook Cracked Down On Guns (Moms, Of Course)
74 Captain America: The Winter Soldier 4 Minute Preview TRAILER (2014) - Movie HD
75 Two New Apps for Jawbone's Up Want to Put You to Sleep | Gadget Lab | Wired.com
76 Physics by hand
77 Memory-Foam Headphones That Sound as Good as They Feel | Gadget Lab | Wired.com
78 f.lux for Mac beta
79 Ex-Apple CEO Sculley said to have Indian smartphone plans
80 Navy will deploy first ship with laser weapon this summer
81 Cloud, Schmoud—To Really Succeed, Web Companies Need Their Own Data Centers
82 Echoes of Pyongyang as South Korea jails politician for 'subversive' plot
83 Memories From 20 Years Of SXSW Interactive
84 Moto X Discounted to $339 for Students
85 Apparently the Media Are Pursuing the Bitcoin Guy in a Car Chase Across Los Angeles
86 Sixteen, Alone, 23 Hours a Day, in a Six-by-Eight-Foot Box
87 Why Bitcoin Doesn't Want a Real Satoshi Nakamoto | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com
88 Google doodle celebrates International Women's Day
89 Can a Serious Game Improve Privacy Awareness on Facebook? | MIT Technology Review
90 iBeacon Comes to SXSW
91 Sangamo Bioscience’s HIV Treatment Study Is First Report of Genome Editing Tested in Patients | MIT Technology Review
92 Bitcoin's elusive founder reportedly discovered living in California
93 Employer Health Cost Increases At 15-Year Low As ObamaCare Comes Into View
94 People Love Their Tablets. That's Bad News for Apple | Wired Business | Wired.com
95 Your New Favorite Player Just Made the NBA
96 Bitcoin Creator Returns To Internet To Say, 'I Am Not Dorian Nakamoto'
97 Darpa's Tiny Lasers Will Soon Hunt for Biochemical Weapons | Danger Room | Wired.com
98 Why These Three Heavy-Hitters Want To Ban 'Bossy'
99 Microsoft plans to patch critical Windows, IE bugs next week
100 Can This New Programming Language Change the World?