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7'5 Tacko "Taco" Fall Is The Tallest High School Player In The World

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Drake Goes Undercover to See What Fans Really Think of Him [VIDEO]

Rapper Drake appeared on Thursday's 'Jimmy Kimmel Live' to find out what fans really thought of him.

Michigan State Coach Offers Moving Eulogy for 'Princess' Lacey

Michigan State coach Tom Izzo's moving speech about young fan Lacey Holsworth, who died this week, is the most powerful eight minutes you'll see today.

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1
Booking Video: Aaron Swartz Jokes, Jousts With Cops After MIT Bust | Threat Level | WIRED

“What are you here for?” a police officer asks casually as he worries the handcuffs off Aaron Swartz’s wrists. “I don’t know,” Swartz replies. “I was riding down the street. Some guy took my bike, and I was arrested.” The exchange opens a 45 minute police booking video that shows Swartz at the moment his life began to unravel on January 6, 2011. Provided by the Secret Service in my ongoing Freedom of Information Act lawsuit against the agency, the video was recorded at the intake desk at the Cambridge Police Department, where Swartz had just been brought in on charges of breaking-and-entering into an unsecured networking closet on MIT’s campus. Swartz’s arrest that day marked the end of a months-long cat-and-mouse game between MIT personnel and the activist, who had stashed a laptop computer in the basement closet to download millions of articles from the JSTOR academic database available free from the campus. MIT had captured surveillance video of the slender, nervous looking young man inside the closet, but didn’t know who he was, until an MIT cop on the investigation recognized his suspect riding a bike on the streets of Cambridge and chased him down.

2
Individuals targeted as San Francisco tech money protests intensify

Late last year, protesters began to block the commuter buses that ferry employees from San Francisco to the offices of tech companies, including Facebook, Google and Yahoo, south of the city. The unmarked, WiFi-equipped buses use public stops and are viewed by many as a symbol of the industry's disconnect from a broader community left behind by the tech boom.

3
Heartbleed: Making The Case For SDN - InformationWeek

SDN is a fundamental change to the traditional network. It's a new framework/architecture instead of a standalone technology. From networking protocol perpsective, it provides a proactive approach to mitigate possible flaws/vulnerabilities. But I am afraid it will take longer time to establish SDN framework than developing the security patch - there is still some distance from the ideal state.

4
Mailbox for Android review - CNET

In its aim to be minimalistic, the app has done away with any and all Gmail labels. Each of us uses labels and folders in Gmail all the time, and some labels directly connect to different email addresses altogether. The only way to access those emails is by going to your archive folder. The fact that labels aren't easily accessible irks me a little. Instead, Mailbox has Lists, which Mailbox presets, so you can file away emails under a certain category. You can create more as you go along, but you initially start with "To Buy," "To Read," and "To Watch."

5
Spouses of H-1B Visa Holders May Soon Be Allowed to Work in the U.S. - India Real Time - WSJ

This is stupid. If you want more talented people to come work in the U.S., increase the freaking CAP! There are tens of thousands of talented foreigners who either didn’t get the H-1b lottery or do not qualify in the first place that want to work here. Instead of giving them a visa, you allow their spouse to actually come and take jobs that might not be in demands? Seriously?

6
8 Rad College Courses Inspired by the Internet

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 34 million unique visitors worldwide and 15 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

7
Amazon Will Pay You $5,000 to Quit Your Job | TIME

Bloomberg / Getty Images If you work for Amazon, that is In the company’s annual letter to shareholders , Amazon chief Jeff Bezos revealed what has to be the most counterintuitive personnel policy in corporate America today: If an employee isn’t happy working at the online retail giant, they can earn up to $5,000 just for quitting. Bezos describes it as one of the company’s “better ways to do things internally.” Called Pay To Quit, the program is “pretty simple,” Bezos says. “Once a year, we offer to pay our associates to quit. The first year the offer is made, it’s for $2,000. Then it goes up one thousand dollars a year until it reaches $5,000. The headline on the offer is ‘Please Don’t Take This Offer.’” Pay To Quit started at Amazon-owned Zappos, and the parent company adopted the concept for its fulfillment centers. On one hand, it sounds backwards. Companies pay their employees to work, not to not work. Then again, this is a company that isn’t afraid to flirt with wacky ideas like delivering merchandise via unmanned drone aircraft.

8
Chrome beta for Android makes it easy to send web video to Chromecast

You no longer have to engage in some hidden setting gymnastics just to send web videos from Chrome for Android to your Chromecast . Google has rolled out a Chrome 35 beta that lets you deliver "some" clips from the browser to a Chromecast-equipped TV. The company hasn't said just which videos are compatible, but it notes that YouTube support is rough around the edges. Even if your favorite media site is broken, you can check out a few other notable upgrades: Chrome now does full-screen videos with both HTML5 controls and subtitles, and it boasts improved support for multi-window devices. Head over to Google Play to grab the update if you're a regular web movie watcher.

9
IAC Shares Explode, Then Crash After A Report About Its Stake In Hot Dating Site Tinder

IAC Shares Explode, Then Crash After A Report About Its Stake In Hot Dating Site Tinder

10
IKEA Continues Trend Of Supplying Its Own Renewable Energy

The Hoopeston wind facility is expected to generate up to 380,000 megawatthours of renewable energy each year, which is equivalent to 165% of the electricity consumed by IKEA US (comprised of 38 stores, five distribution centers, two service centers and one factory), or 18% of the electricity used by the IKEA Group worldwide. IKEA currently has investments in wind projects in eight countries (with a total of 206 turbines) as well as 550,0000 solar panels. In 2013, IKEA renewables produced 1,425,000 megawatthours of electricity, which is equivalent to 37% of the company’s total energy (not just electricity) needs. IKEA has invested heavily in energy efficiency as well.

11
Mojio preps a new connected car module that will feature its own app store

By launching with a stable of third-party apps, Mojio hopes to differentiate itself from that pack. That strategy means attracting developers, which themselves are attracted to devices that ship in large volumes. While that developer community could take a while to build, Mojio’s module will have plenty  of functionality to make it useful in the interim. Mojio’s future roadmap also includes new hardware advancements, Giraud said. Mojio is looking into a building a module that includes both LTE and Wi-Fi connectivity, which would not only connect cars to the internet but the tablets, smartphones and other Wi-Fi gadgets passengers bring with them.

12
Stay connected with notifications on twitter.com | Twitter Blogs

When you’re logged in on twitter.com, you will receive notifications if someone has replied, favorited or retweeted one of your Tweets. You can also receive notifications for direct messages and new followers. They’re fully interactive, so that you can reply, favorite, retweet, and follow right from the notification. We’ll be rolling this feature out over the coming weeks.

13
Turning The Ship: Microsoft Might Have Begun A Subtle Shift From Windows To Services | TechCrunch

Since Steve Ballmer passed the torch to Satya Nadella earlier this year, it marked a sea change in the organization: the first time in its history one of the founding team wasn’t running the show. Changes were expected and have happened. A surprising one is a subtle shift toward a service model and what appears to be an understanding that as long as people are running Microsoft tools, the hardware and underlying operating system don’t matter.

14
PAX East: Hearthstone Single-Player Naxxramas Campaign Revealed - IGN

After months of teases, Blizzard has finally lifted the lid on Hearthstone's first major expansion: Curse of Naxxramas. The single-player adventure introduces 30 new player cards, a variety of new bosses each with a custom hero power and other fresh tricks, and a new interactive Naxxramas game board.

15
Hot But Not That Hot: Tinder Stake Sale Puts Valuation of Whole Startup at $500 Million

That is one of the reasons, said sources, that Palihapitiya sold his shares. According to those familiar with the situation, within his ownership agreement was a mutual put/call option clause, which gives the holder the right to sell or buy shares that will trigger by early next year. With the large ownership stake by IAC, Palihapitiya apparently determined that he would likely not prevail in keeping his shares and decided to sell now in advance of that clause triggering.

16
Google Glass goes on sale in the US 'for one day only' - Telegraph

The company has so far limited its sale of the internet-connected eyewear to developers and specially-selected aficionados. But the $1,500 eyewear, which is not available in the UK, will be available for a single day for the general public to buy, with the sale starting and ending on Tuesday.

17
Building The Perfect Instagram Portfolio

Not all firms hiring in creative fields rely on Instagram and Pinterest as heavily as Silver, nor will having a well-curated online presence sans a portfolio always be enough to land a job. But at the very least, Instagram allows people in creative fields to maintain visibility in a cheap and easy way. Friedman used to, for example, send out mailers of his work to editors and art buyers to keep his photography on their minds. He doesn't do that anymore. Instagram reaches more people with less effort and fewer resources.

18
Report: Star Wars Episode 7 to Partially Film in Abu Dhabi - IGN

Report: Star Wars Episode 7 to Partially Film in Abu Dhabi

19
Can You Buy A License to Speed?

But some answers indicate that people have reason to believe that the frames will help them avoid tickets. In addition to the frames, the CHP 11-99 Foundation gives out membership cards to big donors. In reference to secondhand or fake frames, one cop wrote, “Unless you have the I.D. in hand when (not if) I stop you, no love will be shown.” Another added, “Ya gotta have more than just a license plate frame or a sticker.” The implication from these officers seems to be that buying a fake license plate frame is useless, but real donors will receive some leniency.

20
Staples Wants To Be The Kinkos Of 3D Printing | TechCrunch

Staples is getting a jump on 3D printing and just rolled-out a 3D printing service to two of its U.S. locations in New York and Los Angeles, where consumers can walk in and have a 3D doodad printed.

21
Samsung Galaxy S5 dev edition slated for Verizon - CNET

Verizon is one carrier that will sell the device, and just not today, when the Galaxy S5 officially lines store shelves. Samsung's Web site promises that this version will arrive in charcoal gray "soon."

22
Alibaba Acquires AutoNavi

Of course, Alibaba already owned a 28 percent stake in AutoNavi , so the two companies were closely aligned anyway. But by bringing the company fully under its wing, it’s going all in with maps, in what is a thinly-veiled shot at fellow Chinese giant Baidu which has been bolstering its own mapping tools in recent times.

23
Dating App Tinder Is So Spectacularly Successful It's Now Worth $5 Billion

IAC, which owns a majority stake in the company it helped incubate, recently purchased 10% more of Tinder from early Facebook employee and investor Chamath Palihapitiya for $500 million, according to Saito. 

24
Earth becomes art in breathtaking satellite imagery

From above, the Vatnajokull Glacier is an eerie splash of blue against the florid hues of the surrounding landscape. This image of Iceland's Skaftafell National Park was taken by a satellite miles above the Earth. It's beautiful and also just one of the many geographical wonders showcased in the Earth as Art collection.

25
http://icontherecord.tumblr.com/post/82416436703/statement-on-bloomberg-news-story-that-nsa-knew

Reports that NSA or any other part of the government were aware of the so-called Heartbleed vulnerability before April 2014 are wrong. The Federal government was not aware of the recently identified vulnerability in OpenSSL until it was made public in a private sector cybersecurity report. The Federal government relies on OpenSSL to protect the privacy of users of government websites and other online services. This Administration takes seriously its responsibility to help maintain an open, interoperable, secure and reliable Internet. If the Federal government, including the intelligence community, had discovered this vulnerability prior to last week, it would have been disclosed to the community responsible for OpenSSL. When Federal agencies discover a new vulnerability in commercial and open source software – a so-called “Zero day” vulnerability because the developers of the vulnerable software have had zero days to fix it – it is in the national interest to responsibly disclose the vulnerability rather than to hold it for an investigative or intelligence purpose. In response to the recommendations of the President’s Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies, the White House has reviewed its policies in this area and reinvigorated an interagency process for deciding when to share vulnerabilities.

26
Founder of Women Who Eat on Tubes claims Facebook has taken group down

Tony Burke, a filmmaker who set up the page on which users post surreptitious photos of women eating on the London Underground, claimed Facebook took the group down on Friday morning. He appeared on Radio 4's Today programme alongside Lucy Brisbane McKay, who is organising a protest against the group in the form of a picnic on the Circle Line.

27
Major Conviction Of Hacker Is Overturned

Prosecutors said Auernheimer, 28, is a publicity-hungry hacker who broke the law when he found a security flaw in an AT&T website three years ago that allowed him to collect 114,000 email addresses belonging to iPad 3G users. Auernheimer turned over that information to the gossip site Gawker, which posted some partially redacted addresses, prompting an FBI investigation.

28
Is There Anything Beyond Quantum Computing? - The Nature of Reality — NOVA Next | PBS

So far, we’ve been talking about computers that can simulate “standard,” non-relativistic quantum mechanics. If we want to bring special relativity into the picture, we need quantum field theory—the framework for modern particle physics, as studied at colliders like the LHC—which presents a slew of new difficulties. First, many quantum field theories aren’t even rigorously defined: It’s not clear what we should program our quantum computer to simulate. Also, in most quantum field theories, even a vacuum is a complicated object, like an ocean surface filled with currents and waves. In some sense, this complexity is a remnant of processes that took place in the moments after the Big Bang, and it’s not obvious that a quantum computer could efficiently simulate the dynamics of the early universe in order to reproduce that complexity. So, is it possible that a “quantum field theory computer” could solve certain problems more efficiently than a garden-variety quantum computer? If nothing else, then at least the problem of simulating quantum field theory?

29
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30
Open source software is more secure, right? So what happened with OpenSSL?

Excellent points raised. Software has bugs. So does open source software. It’s not fundamentally more secure, but it’s fundamentally easier to become more secure. That does not make it risky to use open source, but risky to assume a false sense of quality. As we leverage the work that others share, we are motivated to give back with automated test results, code bug fixes, and funding to those projects that we rely upon. This is a painful lesson given the challenges this week with this bug, but the call to action is one worth sharing. Thanks,

31
Apple rests its case against Samsung after calling it a copycat yet again

At risk for both companies are potentially large sums of money and possible sales bans on products if they are deemed to be infringing on the patents. In Apple's case, it wants damages of $2.191 billion, whereas Samsung's going after Apple for about $6.9 million. These amounts could be far less, depending on how the jury decides. That was the case in a similar trial between the companies two years ago, where Apple wanted between $2.5 and $2.75 billion and  ended up winning $939.8 million instead .

32
Data Point: One Bright Spot From the End of XP - Digits - WSJ

But the first-quarter drop wasn’t as bad as it has been over the past two years. Four out of the five top PC makers — Lenovo, H-P, Dell and Asus, saw an increase in shipments of desktops and laptops, Gartner said. The end of XP support April 8 played a role, Gartner said, and will continue to do so in the coming quarters.

33
Philippe Starck wants to let you make 3D-printed custom furniture

Don't hold off on furnishing your home in the short term, though. Starck is aware that it will take a few years for 3D printing to scale in cost and size to where you can print your dream chair at home. Those kiosks, meanwhile, may have to wait until on-the-spot 3D printing is more efficient than shipping old-fashioned products. Still, it's apparent that the days of limited furniture choices are numbered.

34
Richard Branson's trying to track down the 80s kid who inspired Virgin Galactic

In 1988, a young chap by the name of Shihan Musafer rang BBC children's show Going Live to ask Richard Branson if he'd ever thought about travelling to space. "I'd love to go into space, as I think pretty well everybody watching this show would love to go to space," he eagerly replied. Turns out, that call 26 years ago served as the catalyst for Sir Richard to register the name Virgin Galactic , the company that's now on course to take well-moneyed civilians into outerspace later this year . To thank Shihan "for helping to inspire the idea," Branson's hoping to use the power of social to help track down the now grown-up Brit, so that he can personally invite him to get the VIP treatment while "witnessing a spaceflight." While that makes it sound like he's getting a free return ticket to the heavens, in fact he just gets to watch the rich and famous take off. So close.

35
Seoul's Flea Markets: Where Tech Goes To Die

SEOUL—How did a 70-year-old Philco radio find itself 8,000 miles from home? Seoul is home to some of the most advanced tech in the world, vibrating between the poles of Samsung and LG, blanketed with LTE-Advanced waves. But Seoul's flea markets are where American and Japanese technology goes to die—and maybe, if you're waving the right packet of won notes, to be reborn.

36
Exclusive: Microsoft, Apple diverge on bankrolling big patent buyer

This is exactly why the politicians are doing nothing but stalling on patent reform. Corporate America has not decided what to do about it yet. Big players on both sides means politicians do nothing but wait until they’re told to do something. What a shame. It really doesn’t matter what’s good for the people or the country. Just what’s good for the USCA.

37
Facebook Really Can't Change WhatsApp's Privacy Policies Now

In a letter sent Thursday (and viewable below in its entirety), the FTC, a government agency meant to protect U.S. consumers from unfair business practices, told Facebook that it doesn't expect the company to change WhatsApp's privacy policies from those first promised to pre-acquisition users.

38
A Very Special Episode of the Engadget Podcast is live at 4PM ET!

Nerds cannot live on tech news alone. That's why, every so often, we'll be hosting a Very Special Episode of the Engadget Podcast where we touch upon the cultural and social impacts of the technology that matters most to you. Sometimes, that means we'll even be talking about booze. We are all onions, after all...

39
SF housing protests get personal as second Googler is confronted at home

Protests focused on the negative effects of tech companies have become increasingly common in recent months, and they're getting personal. This morning, protestors who say they're being evicted by a Google lawyer protested in front of the property he owns.

40
Volvo’s New Child Car Seat Inflates In 40 Seconds

Rather than being constructed out of rigid plastic and metal, their seat uses heavy duty drop-stitch fabric--the same stuff you’ll find in outdoor gear such as inflatable rafts. So you can pull that car seat out of a bag, and watch it balloon into a seat. It does this amazing feat in 40 seconds, thanks to a silent internal pump. You can even set it to inflate from your phone via Bluetooth, if you're into that extra effort.

41
Internet Revolt Begins as Condi Rice Joins Dropbox Board | Business | WIRED

Amid the shiny, happy announcements of new features and new apps this week, file-sharing startup Dropbox quietly revealed another piece of news. Condoleezza Rice — Stanford professor, Iraq War architect, alleged warrantless wiretap supporter — is joining the board at the rising tech startup.

42
At Least One Heartbleed ‘Disaster’ Scenario May Be Impossible - Digits - WSJ

Here’s the good news: after extensive testing on our software stack, we have been unable to successfully use Heartbleed on a vulnerable server to retrieve any private key data. Note that is not the same as saying it is impossible to use Heartbleed to get private keys. We do not yet feel comfortable saying that. However, if it is possible, it is at a minimum very hard. And, we have reason to believe based on the data structures used by OpenSSL and the modified version of NGINX that we use, that it may in fact be impossible.

43
My heart is ok, but my eyes are bleeding

First we would like to state that, as far as complexity goes, the heartbleed vulnerability is nothing special, but that doesn’t mean it was easy to find. All bugs are easy to spot after someone else points them out to you. Hindsight is 20/20 after all. Riku, Antti and Matti at Codenomicon and Neel Mehta at Google all independently discovered this bug. Neel was also kind enough to sanity check this post before it went live (thank you Neel!) Whatever your feelings on vulnerability disclosure are, you should thank them for finding the bug and giving us all something interesting to talk about.

44
This augmented-reality kids' toy will make you feel so old

“From our experience with the DIY platform we know, children want to discover interactive worlds in the same way as they learn about physical world. They don’t differentiate here,” explains Founder of Toywheel Evgeni Kouris.

45
In smartphone-saturated Korea, carriers face rampant gov't suppression

Subsidizing mobile phone is a common practice followed in the United States and some other countries. Around the world, consumers can buy the device at a very low price in exchange for an exclusive subscription with the telecom operator. Korean companies are trying to implement a similar business model, even against the existing regulations in the country that limits subsidies to 270,000 won (around $260).

46
Who should win a Webby for Web / News? Vote now.

Behold the miracle of the Internet. Divine websites. Viral videos. Social brilliance. Heavenly apps. It's all here, awaiting your judgment.

47
coachella

Policy & Safety

48
Booking.com: 448,064 hotels worldwide. Book your hotel now!

The hotel was very clean and budget friendly. We took the bus to go shopping which was not a problem. With the money we saved by not staying in a hotel right downtown we were able to take a few tours and enjoy the restaurants. We all enjoyed ourselves very much.

49
Home - Years Of Living Dangerously

2 DAYS until the series premiere of Years of Living Dangerously! Are you hosting a WATCH PARTY or want to JOIN one? They start at 7:00pm ET on Sunday - April 13th. http://350.org/years/ After the watch parties, join our Google+ HANGOUT with Ian Somerhalder, Chris Hayes, and other series' stars at 8:30pm ET. http://350.org/years/

50
A monkey that controls a robot with its thoughts. No, really.

Can we use our brains to directly control machines — without requiring a body as the middleman? Miguel Nicolelis talks through an astonishing experiment, in which a clever monkey in the US learns to control a monkey avatar, and then a robot arm in Japan, purely with its thoughts. The research has big implications for quadraplegic people — and maybe for all of us. (Filmed at TEDMED 2012.)

51 Eesha Khare: Inventing the One-Minute Mobile Phone Charger
52 Soon Amazon Could Use 3D Phone To Get You To Buy Stuff: Report
53 This Is What Dr. Zizmor Looks Like In 2014
54 That Oscar Selfie Is Never Going To Go Away, Is It?
55 Side Drawer Navigation Could Cost Half Your User Engagement
56 Flow, the secret to happiness
57 5 Incredibly Effective Ways to Work Smarter, Not Harder
58 Tales of ice-bound wonderlands
59 http://discovermagazine.com/2009/the-brain-2/28-what-happened-to-hominids-who-were-smarter-than-us
60 WIRED Space Photo of the Day | Science | WIRED
61 Ohio Police Chief’s Letter to Facebook Trolls Will Save Us All
62 The World's Best Sustainability Ideas
63 The TheTechNewsBlog Daily
64 7 Emotional Moments From Nirvana's Hall of Fame Induction
65 5 B.S. Renaissance Myths You Learned in History Class
66 You're Not Going to Deform Your Spine by Texting Too Much
67 Font War: Inside the Design World's $20 Million Divorce
68 Scientists 3D Print a 'Tumor' of Cancer Cells
69 Elmo Adorably Refuses to 'Do It for the Vine'
70 How Google Picks New Employees (Hint: It's Not About Your Degree)
71 Navy laser weapon with 'video game-like controller' set to deploy - CNET
72 Wizard juggler tricks people's minds with a ring of illusions
73 The Nun Who Got Addicted to Twitter
74 Kids Are Heroes® is on JustCoz!
75 This Is the End of Facebook as We Know It | Business | WIRED
76 Glenn Greenwald Returns To The United States
77 The Best Password Managers
78 “DWTS’: Amy Purdy’s graceful bionics
79 Drinking coffee inside a two-story camera
80 Amazon already designing eighth generation of delivery drones, says Jeff Bezos
81 America's nuclear legacy casts a toxic shadow on Navajo lands
82 'Allegiant' to Be Split Into 2 Films, Copying 'Hunger Games' Again
83 Myanmar Newspapers Print Black Front Pages to Protest Government Crackdown
84 Welcome to Silicon Valley: Give Right or Get Out! - NBC News
85 Health And Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius Resigns
86 Stretchable Electronic Patch Senses Tremors and Delivers Drugs | MIT Technology Review
87 Court Upholds Killer Whale Safety Ruling Against SeaWorld
88 Amazon Fire TV review: the set-top that tries to do everything
89 Wiretap Proponent Condoleezza Rice Joins Dropbox’s Board
90 7 Chrome Extensions To Save You When You Have Too Many Tabs Open
91 Laboratory-grown vaginas offer help for girls born with rare genetic condition
92 Refresh Makes You Smarter At Meetings | TechCrunch
93 Nuclear Powers Ahead in Some Countries, Falters in Others | MIT Technology Review
94 Absurd Creature of the Week: Cross-Dressing Cuttlefish Puts on World’s Most Spectacular Light Show | Science | WIRED
95 Bugatti Legend ‘Black Bess’ honors the Veyron’s great grandfather
96 12 Hit Albums With Deep Roots in Tech
97 Heartbleed Fallout Continues: Canada Orders Shutdown of More Gov't Sites