Top Videos
I do an Apple Watch try-on session - Your Tech Weblog

My try-on session was over in what seemed like a minute or two, and I did not have time to do everything I wanted. I only wore three watchbands, including two leather versions, and was left wondering about other watchbands made of various metals.

A Clever Shock-Absorbing Bike Wheel, Now for Wheelchairs | WIRED

Designer Sam Pearce created a spoke-less, shock-absorbing wheel that’s being used on wheelchairs and bicycles.

The Solarbike is a very real thing

Here's an electric bike that doesn't need plugging in.. or swapping out batteries. As the name suggests, the Solarbike has solar cells built into both

Stanford's aluminum battery fully charges in just one minute

Lithium-ion batteries have been a boon for the modern world -- they've replaced the heavier, single-use alkaline type in everything from wristwatches to

DJI's Phantom 3 brings 4K recording to its most popular drone

DJI's Phantom series of read-to-fly quadcopters have been instrumental in bringing drones into mainstream consciousness. Particularly the Phantom 2 Visio

WIRED Binge-Watching Guide: Adventure Time | WIRED

Grab your friends and whip up some bacon pancakes, it's time to binge-watch <em>Adventure Time</em>.

SpaceX just released some gorgeous 4K rocket launch footage

As if watching rockets going to space wasn't already awesome, SpaceX just released a two-minute supercut of 4K footage of its Falcon 9 rocket launches. It's got some slow-motion footage, some...

The Next Tech Boom Is Taking Place Behind Bars

When San Francisco-based venture capitalists Chris Redlitz and Beverly Parenti walked into San Quentin State Prison in 2010 to speak with a group of inmates that a friend was mentoring, they didn’t know what exactly to expect. But the men be...

Why you really want to update iOS now ( it's not emojis)

Artist's impression of the people potentially behind iOS vulnerability. Photo: Hackers, United Artists With reports that it can break elements of Touch ID,

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Top News
1
Microsoft and Getty settle their copyright dispute

Microsoft and Getty Images have settled a copyright dispute and agreed to work together to provide the digital media company's images for the software giant's products like Bing and Cortana.

2
Coachella day 1 in photos: Everything you missed

On Friday, day one of the immensely popular music festival kicked off in Indio, California. After sets from a bevy of artists, including Azealia Banks and Alabama Shakes, heavy rockers AC/DC closed out the night with a headlining set.

3
Hillary Clinton's campaign logo is already causing controversy

For some, the announcement was overshadowed by that ever-important campaign staple — the logo — which in Clinton's case came in the form of a big, bold letter "H" crossed through with a red arrow. Her social media accounts were immediately revamped to feature the new logo.

4
Forbes Tech News on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

5
Firefly – Instant, Full-Text Search Engine for Dropbox (Part 1)

We want Firefly to be the one system that powers searches for all our users and we want it to be blazing fast — our goal is to have serving latency under 250 msecs at the 95th percentile (i.e., 95 percent of all searches should take less than 250 msecs). For a compelling user experience we also want it to index a document “instantly”. That is, additions or modifications to a Dropbox should be reflected in search results in under 10 secs (95th percentile). In essence: we set a goal to build a search engine that performed well in all three dimensions. What could possibly go wrong? :)

6
Robotic Player Guitar Rocks Out on It’s Own

Back in 1988 [Ben Reardon] walked through the Japanese pavilion at the World Expo held in Brisbane, Australia. He saw a robot playing a classical guitar, and was in awe. Later in his life, he decided to learn guitar, and always thought back to that robot. After going to SIGGRAPH 2014 and being inspired by all the creative makers out there, he realized the technology was here —  to build his own Robot Guitar.

7
On being wrong

Most of us will do anything to avoid being wrong. But what if we're wrong about that? "Wrongologist" Kathryn Schulz makes a compelling case for not just admitting but embracing our fallibility.

8
Fighters - Mortal Kombat X Wiki Guide - IGN

"Kombatants" will enter the ring again in Mortal Kombat X, and they'll use their deadly powers, weapons, and fighting techniques to konquer the most violent tournament in all the realms.

9 MIT Technology Review

English (US)

10
Love -- you're doing it wrong

In this delightful talk, philosopher Yann Dall’Aglio explores the universal search for tenderness and connection in a world that's ever more focused on the individual. As it turns out, it's easier than you think. A wise and witty reflection on the state of love in the modern age. (Filmed at TEDxParis.)

11
Getting Started

Hillary's running for president because everyday Americans need a champion—and she wants to be that champion. Watch her announcement video to kick off the campaign. http://hillaryclinton.com/join/

12
http://venturebeat.com/2015/04/09/linkedin-acquires-online-education-startup-lynda-com-for-1-5b-to-help-you-progress-your-career/

Through the acquisition, which is expected to close in Q2 2015, LinkedIn is looking to further align itself with career development, and the deal does make sense for the company given its focus on connecting businesses and workers from around the world. By integrating Lynda.com into LinkedIn, a number of potential use cases emerge. For example, a job-hunter can see what skills are required for a potential new role, and then be guided towards the relevant videos and accredited courses if they are lacking a particular skill.

13
Apple Watch: the definitive review

Apple tells me that upcoming software updates will address these performance issues, but for right now, they’re there, and they’re what I’ve been thinking about every morning as I get ready for work. Wearing a smartwatch like the Apple Watch is a far deeper commitment than carrying a smartphone in your pocket; you are literally putting the technology on your body and allowing it to touch and measure you while you display it to the rest of the world. Committing to technology that’s a little slow to respond to you is dicey at best, especially when it’s supposed to step in for your phone. If the Watch is slow, I’m going to pull out my phone. But if I keep pulling out my phone, I’ll never use the Watch. So I have resolved to wait it out.

14
The difference between winning and succeeding

With profound simplicity, Coach John Wooden redefines success and urges us all to pursue the best in ourselves. In this inspiring talk he shares the advice he gave his players at UCLA, quotes poetry and remembers his father's wisdom.

15
Why privacy matters

Glenn Greenwald was one of the first reporters to see — and write about — the Edward Snowden files, with their revelations about the United States' extensive surveillance of private citizens. In this searing talk, Greenwald makes the case for why you need to care about privacy, even if you’re “not doing anything you need to hide."

16
Here Are Google's Secrets To Treating Workers Well

The book offers up ways other companies can be more like Google, beyond just giving employees the kinds of perks the tech giant is legendary for: things like free meals and snacks. Or, say, giving workers scooters -- as Google does here at its Eighth Avenue office to quickly get people across the block-long building.

17
See invisible motion, hear silent sounds

Meet the “motion microscope,” a video-processing tool that plays up tiny changes in motion and color impossible to see with the naked eye. Video researcher Michael Rubinstein plays us clip after jaw-dropping clip showing how this tech can track an individual’s pulse and heartbeat simply from a piece of footage. Watch him re-create a conversation by amplifying the movements from sound waves bouncing off a bag of chips. The wow-inspiring and sinister applications of this tech you have to see to believe.

18
Tim Cook On Apple's Future: Everything Can Change Except Values

To have to hear the word "values" in the same sentence as Apple is beyond absurd. Apple, specifically Steve Jobs, and Cook, and anyone else who makes their $$$$$$ on the backs of Commie Slave wage labor AND lack of environmental oversight, while at the same time, disrespecting the US Worker are nothing more than Greedy American Capitalist Pigs. FoxConn and Apple are Peas in a Pod when it comes to exploiting Workers, wherever they are. If Steve Jobs (rip) was a "Genius", Larry, Moe, and Curley were at least Rhodes Scholars. But, there sure are a lot of mindless morons running around with their heads firmly inserted in Apple Azz, so things will probably continue. If you don't know who I'm talking about, it is the folks who wait in line all night to buy the latest piece of Commie Created iCRAP that they just can't LIVE without. What a pack of Morons. I apologize to Pigs for associating them with American Capitalists. My bad, Piggies. You are better than that.

19
Embrace the near win

At her first museum job, art historian Sarah Lewis noticed something important about an artist she was studying: Not every artwork was a total masterpiece. She asks us to consider the role of the almost-failure, the near win, in our own lives. In our pursuit of success and mastery, is it actually our near wins that push us forward?

20
The First 15 Minutes of The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt – IGN First - IGN

We've skipped the opening cinematic and cut straight to the gameplay, as Geralt of Rivia sets out on the final part of his adventure.

21
Artist JeeYoung Lee Converts Her Tiny Studio Into Absurdly Elaborate Non-Digital Dreamscapes

It’s always amazing to witness at artist who embraces one of their greatest limitations, turning it instead into one of their greatest advantages. For Korean artist JeeYoung Lee the question was how to utilize her small studio space in Seoul measuring 11.8′ x 13.5′ x 7.8′ (3.6m x 4.1m x 2.4m) that was proportionally miniscule to the scale of her boundless imagination. Instead of finding a new location or reverting to digital trickery, Lee challenged herself to build some of the most elaborate sets imaginable for the sake of taking a single photograph.

22
The Internet needs YOU

Discrimination of services in any form is detrimental for the growth of the telecom industry itself and there should be no circumstance for a telecom operator to do so. Given the diverse nature of the Internet, telecom operators should not be allowed to determine what type of service should get more priority. For example, a consumer in India probably relies on VoIP calls to keep in touch with people abroad and if there is throttling of these services, it infringes on the user’s fundamental right of freedom of expression. An Internet service that a telecom operator thinks which could lead to traffic congestion, might be vital to consumers. Further, a telecom operator might use throttling to further a service promoted by them and induce consumers into using them, thereby eliminating choice.

23
Facebook launches standalone Messenger for web browsers

There's now a web browser version of Facebook Messenger to go along with the standalone smartphone apps the company is making everyone use. No, Facebook the website isn't taking away your ability to chat with friends. After the controversy that surrounded divorcing the two central features on mobile, Facebook is adamant that Messenger isn't leaving Facebook.com anytime soon. Instead, Messenger for the web — which you'll find at  Messenger.com starting today — focuses solely on simple conversations and leaves the other parts of Facebook that can be distracting to the primary site.

24
Brain-to-brain communication has arrived. How we did it

You may remember neuroscientist Miguel Nicolelis — he built the brain-controlled exoskeleton that allowed a paralyzed man to kick the first ball of the 2014 World Cup. What’s he working on now? Building ways for two minds (rats and monkeys, for now) to send messages brain to brain. Watch to the end for an experiment that, as he says, will go to "the limit of your imagination."

25
Web's new question: Is this cat going up or down the stairs? - CNET

On Facebook , there are some fascinating deductions. Hillman Leung insists the cat is going up and down because it's Schrodinger's cat. Another poster, Shjnrzktrk Zkstrkjsd, insists: "If a cat walks down, it's tail always stands up, if a cat walks up, it's tail always stay down. Biologic Rulz."

26
The eeriness of the English countryside

It isn’t hard to see why contemporary eerie culture should be drawn to such evidence of record and detection. If the eerie is – as Fanshawe found on Gallows Hill – about the experience of being watched by a presence that you cannot perceive, then this, certainly, is another cause for its present relevance. For the state has never before been as able to detect and follow the movements of its subjects. Nor – since Snowden – have we been as conscious of the extent to which we are continuously being observed by unseen forces, not always operating with what Fanshawe called “pleasant intent”. Yet state surveillance is no longer testified to in the landscape by giant edifices. Instead it is mostly carried out in by software programs running on computers housed in ordinary-looking government buildings, its sources and effects – like all eerie phenomena – glimpsed but never confronted.

27
This Co-Ed Coding Class For Teens In Ghana Is Breaking Down Gender Stereotypes

Regina Agyare didn't initially include boys in her computer coding class. But after one male student expressed his discontent at seeing " girls being empowered ," she spotted an opportunity.

28
A kinder, gentler philosophy of success

Alain de Botton examines our ideas of success and failure — and questions the assumptions underlying these two judgments. Is success always earned? Is failure? He makes an eloquent, witty case to move beyond snobbery to find true pleasure in our work.

29
Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2015

These results are not unbiased. Like the results of any survey, they are skewed by selection bias, language bias, and probably a few other biases. So take this for what it is: the most comprehensive developer survey ever conducted. Or at least the only one that asks devs about tabs vs. spaces.

30
I made a bold move from iPhone to Android, and I completely regret it

I was committed to going big for my next phone, but we were a month away from the iPhone 6 Plus, and I was in an anti-Apple phase. I was sick of the hype around the company. It felt trendy among friends and colleagues in the worst kind of way, like a popular diet program that is all hype with mounds of hurt — disconnected from reality.

31
The unintended consequences of being "tough on crime"

“We’re in this exciting moment where we’ve had 40 years of being ‘tough on crime,’ and we’ve finally come to recognize that it really hasn’t worked very well,” says sociologist Alice Goffman bluntly. “Scientists have shown in the past few years that the relationship between incarceration and crime is basically zip. The crime rate goes up and down, incarceration just continues to grow. It’s not a good way of fighting crime.”

32
Why people need poetry

"We're all going to die — and poems can help us live with that." In a charming and funny talk, literary critic Stephen Burt takes us on a lyrical journey with some of his favorite poets, all the way down to a line break and back up to the human urge to imagine.

33
Apple Watch review - CNET

Of course, the original iPhone never had apps right out of the gate. The Apple Watch's early apps feel like those apps from the first days of the iPhone: simple menus, basic functions, common interfaces. Most apps aim for bare-bones utility. Apple has suggested that Watch apps aim for no more than 5-10 seconds of interactivity at a time. That shows in the design of many apps. Of the 33 or so I've seen so far, the ones I've liked the most have been Twitter, Evernote, The New York Times, CNN and TripAdvisor. But none of apps feels as elegant as Apple's own onboard software.

34
How we can help end domestic violence

For me, even though the police were great, they never even brought up the possibility of my husband being arrested. That would have been good for me, and it would have been good for him because it would have been a signal to him that what he was doing was wrong. I was terrified when I had to go to family court — I come from a family of Harvard-educated lawyers, and I was still scared to go to the court system. I was convinced that the judge wouldn’t believe me, because I knew how charming and convincing my husband could be. I was very fortunate that the local domestic violence shelter sent a volunteer to represent me in court. I didn’t know that that kind of support was available, but she helped me — she ran interference, she talked to the judge, she talked to my ex-husband, she protected me.

35
The antidote to apathy

Local politics — schools, zoning, council elections — hit us where we live. So why don't more of us actually get involved? Is it apathy? Dave Meslin says no. He identifies 7 barriers that keep us from taking part in our communities, even when we truly care. (Filmed at TEDxToronto.)

36
You're using your fridge wrong (pictures) - CNET

It's important to understand that your refrigerator's running temperature is an estimated average for the many different zones inside. Just because you set the thing to 37 F doesn't mean that the entire body of the fridge sits uniform at that temperature. Different zones will cool differently, which makes it critical to place foods in the right spots.

37
Twelve Tomorrows

Paul Graham Raven is a postgraduate researcher in infrastructural futures at the University of Sheffield. He’s also a writer, science fiction critic, and essayist, as well as a persistent gadfly in the futurological ointment. He lives a stone’s throw from the site of the Battle of Orgreave, with a duplicitous cat and three guitars he can barely play.

38
Getting Out Of Afghanistan

The gunner in our truck had speakers of his own up in the turret. One of his jobs was to communicate with people outside the truck. He was the only one who could. (The windows on an MRAP do not roll down.) In Afghanistan, this mostly meant waving cars off. The best way to defend against bombers was to keep everyone else away. It could make for tense moments. Most civilians were just trying to go about their day. But the gunner in this truck had come up with his own way of defusing tensions. He had hooked up a smartphone to the speakers and blasted music as loudly as any Camaro-driving homeboy back in the States. This morning, he played Motown. As the Four Tops' "I Can't Help Myself (Sugar Pie Honey Bunch)" rolled out into the streets, the people on the ground perked up. Two small children started dancing. A girl in a pink dress with loafers too big for her came bouncing down an alley. It was as if the circus had come to town and we were an elephant lumbering by. An older man with short white hair and a neatly pressed salwar kameez looked up with an amused smile, as if maybe he recognized the song from his youth, when Kabul was sufficiently Westernized that young women could walk about in miniskirts and DJs could play American pop.

39
​Unlock the secret Spock emoji in iOS 8.3 - CNET

You should now be able to use the Vulcan salute emoji on your iPhone or iPad. Head over to messages, type the shortcut you set (in my case that's "llap") and the emoji should appear. The icon will only be visible, however, to iOS users who have updated to version 8.3.

40
7 Tech Logos Before They Became Iconic

Some of the world’s most ubiquitous logos had humble beginnings. In 1975, Carolyn Davidson was paid $35 to develop the Nike logo and the “Swoosh” we’ve come to recognize has remained more or less intact for nearly forty years.

41
9 Best Hulk vs. Iron Man Fights - IGN

This debut issue used Hulk as a means of bringing the Avengers together for the first time. After Loki manipulated events to make Hulk the scapegoat for a near-disastrous train accident, Giant-Man, Wasp, Thor and Iron Man all united in the manhunt for Hulk. The first time the Armored Avenger clashed with the Jade Giant, Hulk tricked Stark into flying past him and then crippled his armor's power supply (this being at a time when the Iron Man armor was still in its crudest form and Hulk wasn't dumb so much as thuggish and crafty). The second time, Iron Man used his strength to intercept a flying pipe and reshape it into a large grappling hook to subdue Hulk.

42
The complete guide to pre-ordering the Apple Watch - CNET

Our advice? If you want to be one of the first people wearing an Apple Watch, sort out all of the details before online pre-orders begin. And that's what this guide is for -- to help you figure out everything you need to know for that very moment. You also can check out the Apple Watch app that's now on iPhones to see what the different models and sizes look like and what different features are. If you would rather try it on before you buy it, make an appointment on April 10 for a fitting.

43
How to access the new diverse emoji in iOS 8.3 - CNET

Put the days of being represented by a yellow-skinned emoji behind you. Apple just integrated emoji for all skin types in the latest version of iOS 8.

44
The Burn of Wasabi May Lead to New Pain Meds | WIRED

This kind of detail means cryo-EM is going to be useful for much more than basic science. “You can eventually get to see where drugs will bind,” says Julius. Today researchers develop new drugs essentially through trial and error, testing new compounds against targets without really knowing what those targets are. Potentially the kind of detailed view cryo-EM yields can give them a better shot. “Since TRPA1 is also involved in inflammatory pain, this breakthrough may lead to structure-based inhibitors that can treat pain and inflammation,” says Jordt, who was not an author on this paper. (However, he was a post-doc for Julius in 2004. Suffice to say, it is incredibly difficult to find TRPA1 experts with no connection to David Julius.)

45
Life lessons from big cats

Beverly + Dereck Joubert live in the bush, filming and photographing lions and leopards in their natural habitat. With stunning footage (some never before seen), they discuss their personal relationships with these majestic animals — and their quest to save the big cats from human threats.

46
21 things you didn't know your iPhone could do

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images We're nearly attached to our iPhones — we use them all day everyday, but you may be surprised to learn there are still a handful of things it can do that you probably didn't know about.

47
How not to dance at Coachella

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 42 million unique visitors worldwide and 21 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

48
NASA chief says get ready to meet alien life in 20 to 30 years - CNET

However if, as NASA predicts, there will be "definite evidence" of alien life within 20 to 30 years, I may even forsake pierogi (but only the cheese and potato ones) in the hope that I live long enough to see this evidence.

49
Inside Google's Insanely Popular Emotional-Intelligence Course

"For me, mindfulness is a private matter, and this course helped to integrate it . . . to bring it all together and apply it to the business world"—such as what happens when you’re having a difficult conversation with someone in real life, explains Bostelmann. "Specifically in the software industry, we’re in this constant change of the paradigm of the industry. [The program allows people] to handle change in a more skillful way so that you can navigate yourself as a human being and an employee and a leader to understand what’s going on in [yourself] and what’s going on with [your] team."

50
How to live passionately—no matter your age

Author Isabel Allende is 71. Yes, she has a few wrinkles—but she has incredible perspective too. In this candid talk, meant for viewers of all ages, she talks about her fears as she gets older and shares how she plans to keep on living passionately.

51 Got a meeting? Take a walk
52 The Interior Design Of Airbus' New Corporate Jet Is Truly Ingenious
53 Never Check Your Email Before Noon
54 The 10 Most-Pirated Movies
55 Are The Fortune 500 Ready For Mobile Search?
56 What You're Really Saying With Your Office Fashion Choices
57 A new way to grow bone
58 Google Gets Into Battery Arms Race
59 Spoilers are coming: First four 'Game of Thrones' Season 5 episodes leaked
60 How Companies and Services Like Facebook Are Shaped by the Programming Languages They Use | MIT Technology Review
61 Despite its looks, this 3D printed violin (probably) won't kill you
62 The Layman’s Guide To Virtual Reality
63 http://venturebeat.com/2015/04/07/how-games-helped-make-elon-musk-the-real-life-tony-stark/
64 A beautiful site for your event
65 Social maps that reveal a city's intersections — and separations
66 What Happens At AngelPad
67 Let's revive the Golden Rule
68 http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn27311-preinca-canals-may-solve-limas-water-crisis.html#.VSpXzxj3arV
69 Here's What Happens When You Ask Smartphone Users To Read Their App Permissions Out Loud
70 Justin Timberlake and Jessica Biel welcome a baby boy, fans freak out
71 The Board Game of the Alpha Nerds
72 http://venturebeat.com/2015/04/09/amazon-following-microsoft-introduces-a-cloud-service-for-machine-learning/
73 What Taylor Swift Can Teach Your Company About Protecting Its Brand Online
74 The Pet Body-Shaming Industry Is So Much More Intense Than You Thought
75 China Turns to the Sea for Fresh Water
76 What I'd Do Differently If I Was Learning To Code Today
77 Dove Is Really Reaching With This New Stunt That Forces Women To Label Themselves "Average" Or "Beautiful"
78 http://venturebeat.com/2015/04/06/augmented-and-virtual-reality-to-grow-to-150b-by-2020-forecaster-says/
79 New York-Based Tech IPOs Signal East Coast Tech Validation
80 Skype Now Translates Italian and Mandarin in Real-time
81 This Custom Apple II Watch Is My New Favorite Thing
82 Nature's patterns: Golden spirals and branching fractals - CNET
83 The Ants Are Still Dead | WIRED
84 Tesla's Ban In West Virginia Is The Latest Roadblock For Mass-Market Electric Cars
85 http://venturebeat.com/2015/04/08/popcorn-time-app-for-streaming-video-torrents-launches-on-ios-no-jailbreak-required/
86 Tidal's secret weapon isn't celebrities: It's Live Nation
87 MacBook review: Apple reinvents the laptop again
88 12 Bizarre Facts About Jellyfish That Will Blow Your Mind
89 Review: Apple MacBook | WIRED
90 A Look at the Tefifon, Germany's Doomed 1950s Music Player