Top Videos
What Can IFTTT Do for You?

The latest video in our Ask a Dev series takes a look at the powerful web-service known as IFTTT.

Wa-hoo! It's-a 'Super Mario' Theme Played on Wine Glasses [VIDEO]

Listen to the Super Mario Bros. theme song played with wine glasses and pots and pans -- you can practically hear the pixels.

Don't Leave College Without These 10 Digital Skills

Graduation season is upon us, and soon college graduates everywhere will have to face the "real world." These digital skills can help the transition.

This Fan-Made Spider-Man Web Shooter Really Works

A laser weapons hobbyist has put together a Spiderman-inspired webshooter that uses a harpoon-tipped fishing line, instead of a liquid web.

Self-Castrated Rapper Gives New Meaning to YOLO

This week's episode of Socially Awkward takes a look at penis-cutting rapper Andre Johnson, as well as Facebook's creepy new location finding service.

From teleportation to robot servants: Americans’ predictions and dreams for the future

Americans see the next half-century as a period of profound scientific change, but they don't agree on what will or won't come to pass.

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Top News
1 Gabriel Garcia Marquez, R.I.P.

Nobel Prize-winning Colombian novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez passed away at the age of 87. A wonderful writer, who influenced many of us in other parts of the world before there was the Internet, Marquez was a true internationalist before that phrase actually had a meaning. More importantly, he was a man who clearly knew that words are work, and work is words. He might be dead, but he lives with his words. His one quote is something I often think about: “No, not rich. I am a poor man with money, which is not the same thing.”

2
Drone Footage of a Rocket Taking off and Landing is Spectacular

This test footage of the rocket in Texas is spectacular. Instead of the boring footage shot by a camera on the ground at a safe distance, Space X used a hexacopter to shoot the rocket’s launch. The rocket then hovered at approximately 250 meters and landed near the launch pad.

3
Why Does Facebook Want You To Broadcast Your Location To Your Friends?

There’s an obvious better way for Facebook to encourage users to share their location in a way that’s useful to them: Facebook Messenger. The current system has a very crude way to share one’s location, by clicking an arrow. All that does is inform the other user of your current city, which is useless if you’re trying to get together with a friend. Adding a way to share one’s specific location, down to a specific business, office, or other venue, with a specific group of people is an obvious move, and would keep Facebook Messenger competitive with other messaging apps. It would also put users in full control, since they would select exactly who to share location with and when.

4
Legendary British News Agency's 85,000-Video Archive Is Now on YouTube

Pathé News was perhaps the most well-regarded news agency of the 1900s—and now, its entire 85,000-video newsreel archive is available to watch for free on YouTube .

5
Your Internet security relies on a few volunteers

Startups and major corporations frequently use open-source software because it's freely distributed and costs nothing. But they rarely contribute back in dollars or donated time. Without significant outside help -- donating dedicated staff and money without strings attached -- open-source projects like this are at risk of fizzling out or blowing up in our faces, said Azorian Cyber Security founder Charles Tendell.

6
The Future of Social Media Is Mobile Tribes

We crave interpersonal interaction, the basic human need to connect and communicate with each other. The basal layer of social media has remained unchanged, but the chief characteristic of tribes is the tendency to categorize membership in distinct groups, movements, cultures and ideologies—to band together in subpopulations of shared interests, tastes, demographics and marketplaces. Yet, within tribes is the free will to exercise personal choice over who we connect and communicate with. That's where mobile comes in.

7
The Gigaom interview: Thievery Corporation's Rob Garza on how "we live in a streaming world"

Thievery Corporation is a Washington DC-based duo that defined and popularized a genre of music loosely called globetronica. They just released their latest album, Saudade. I caught up with Rob Garza (one half of the group) to talk about Internet, creativity, streaming, Pandora and Spotify.

8
6 Must-See Things at the New York Auto Show

But there are so many brands and technologies on display in the massive Jacob Javits Center in Manhattan, it's easy to miss some of the best products and experiences on offer. So to help you cut through the clutter, we've rounded up some of the must-see cars and experiences in one place.

9
Samsung's Milk Music Service Will Soon Include Ads

Samsung is going to retain the ad-free offer for new users, it seems, and instead introduce ads after a certain point of using Milk Music. That approach makes sense given the intense competition in the mobile music space and the fact that Milk Music is (at this point) a companion app for Samsung devices. But the change may see Samsung lose out on users who appreciate an ad-free experience without cost, even though $3.99 per month is cheaper than Pandora and other rivals.

10
Dutch Dyed Easter Eggs with Flowers & Onion Skins

Onion skins and flowers have been used to dye eggs in celebration of springtime in Lower Saxony—the eastern Netherlands to northern Germany and Estonia—since pagan times.  This method of dying eggs is still practiced in rural areas of the region in celebration of Easter.  Growing up in the Overijssel province of the Netherlands, my father and his family used cloth and string to bind the onion skins and flowers to the eggs as they boiled.  This Instructable, however, uses aluminum foil, which my father describes as a vast improvement over the difficult-to-manage cloth and string.

11
Drones 101 and why your August smart lock hasn't shipped just yet

The second half of the show I talk to Jason Johnson, the CEO of August , a maker of a smart lock launched last June. The $199 lock was expected in December and then in late Spring, but now it’s been pushed out indefinitely. Johnson explains why it’s taken so long to ship. The short answer is that it’s hard to build a smart lock, but the long answer is worth hearing. You might learn something about building consumer products. Johnson ends with his thoughts on how the smart home will come together and avoids telling me product August will improve next.

12
General Mills Legal Policy Change Spooks Facebook Fans

However, Ann Bartow, law professor at Pace Law School, says if you, for instance, accidentally ingest a piece of glass that found its way into your box of Cheerios, you are more likely to be able to sue General Mills in court if you live in New York than other jurisdictions. That's because such consumer disputes are governed by state law, and New York laws are more consumer friendly than those of many other states. Under New York law the General Mills binding arbitration clause is not likely to be enforceable. But you still might have to go to court and get a judge to agree that the clause is unenforceable before you could bring a suit on the merits, increasing the time and costs of litigation.

13
Employee Equity

Another might be to create a new class of employee stock.  Today, in an early-stage company, common shares are usually worth much less than preferred shares.  It might be possible to create a class of shares with less rights than common and thus worth even less.  The idea would be to convert these shares into common on an acquisition or IPO, but before that, they would be non-transferable and have no value.  If it were possible to create a class of stock that the IRS agreed had next to zero value, it might be possible to grant employees this sort of stock, have them owe a tiny bit of tax on it now, and then have normal long-term capital gains treatment years later when the startup goes public.

14
What Exactly Is The Coding Error That Is Responsible For The Heartbleed Bug In OpenSSL?

It appears that this never actually segfaults because, for whatever reason, OpenSSL has a custom implementation of malloc that is enabled by default. So, the next memory addresses out of bounds of the received request are likely part of a big chunk of memory that custom memory allocator is managing and thus would never be caught by the OS as a segmentation violation. (I could be a bit off here, as I haven’t looked at SSL’s memory allocator.)

15
We're Not Joking Around; Something BIG is Coming

So this is as far as I got with the binary — that is, not very. I’m not as good as most of you probably are ;) Looks like three bytes then a parity bit. Even parity, if I’m reading Wikipedia right. Stripping the parity bit and then dumping into ASCII gives junk. So does straight conversion to UTF-8 or Unicode… either it’s encrypted, or I’m wrong about the parity bit, or it’s a weird text standard that I’m not familiar with that’s neither ASCII, nor UTF-8, nor Unicode… the only thing I know for sure at this point is that someone at Hackaday has waaaaaaaay too much time on his or her hands…

16
Uber Adds $1 “Safe Rides Fee” to UberX Rides

revealed today that it is now adding a $1 “Safe Rides Fee” for UberX ridesharing trips in the US.

17
Record Labels Sue Pandora Over Pre-1972 Recordings

According to the just-filed lawsuit, the Copyright Act that created the master recording copyright "expressly preserves for pre-72 recordings 'any rights or remedies under the common law or statutes of any states' -- which rights and remedies are not in any way annulled or limited." The lawsuit further states that the New York courts have done so by recognizing and enforcing exclusive ownership rights in pre-1972 recordings. “For more than 100 years, the courts repeatedly have affirmed the policy of this [New York] State that the unique performances embodied in sound recordings are intangible property interests protected from unauthorized use and exploitation,” the complaint states.

18
Mandiant: Hackers Broke In Using Heartbleed - Digits - WSJ

Mandiant, a unit of FireEye, didn’t name the client affected and there is no evidence hackers actually stole data. But the disclosure offers one of the first examples of someone using Heartbleed, a flaw in Internet encryption, to carry out a break-in.

19
You Can Now Try Google Glass at Home Before You Buy It

You told us you’re interested in purchasing Glass, but wanted to wait until we had frames for Glass. We have some good news for you. We recently introduced the Titanium Collection — four feather-light titanium frames that are designed to fit with your prescription and personal style. And even more good news — you’ve been selected to participate in a free home try-on pilot, to help you find the frame style and Glass color that fits you best before you purchase.

20
Learn & lead: USC Advanced Management Program for Digital Leaders

DISRUPTION. INNOVATION. CONVERGENCE. Digital technologies are transforming the communications, technology and entertainment sectors. USC’s Advanced Management Program is a five-day course that covers business strategy in the age of mobile, digital, social, big data and the cloud with a focus on leadership and innovation.

21
It's Time to Ditch Facebook and Start Over

Most of us have had Facebook accounts for the past few years, if not a decade. But time and bloat have turned once-beloved font of nostalgia into an onslaught of faux-sentimental sludge from strangers. So as Facebook stands poised to break itself into a bunch of different apps, we say to you: Screw it. It's time to start fresh.

22
Hidden Vulnerability Discovered in the World's Airline Network | MIT Technology Review

The global network of links between the world’s airports looks robust but contains a hidden weakness that could lead to entire regions of the planet being cut off.

23
Uber Adds $1 'Safe Rides Fee'

"This Safe Rides Fee supports our continued efforts to ensure the safest possible platform for Uber riders and drivers, including an industry-leading background check process, regular motor vehicle checks, driver safety education, development of safety features in the app, and insurance," the company wrote in a new " What Is The Safe Rides Fee " section of its "Fares & Fees" FAQ on its site.

24
#AskWSJD: Why Would I Want to Unlock My Phone? - Personal Tech News - WSJ

Consumers can typically bring their phone to a carrier to have them unlocked once their contract is up. In fact, the major U.S. carriers, thanks to the FCC’s help, will soon surface information about unlocking. However, attempting to unlock a phone yourself is still not legal at this point, and can be technically tricky, too.

25
Watch Elon Musk's Reusable Rocket Launch And Land Itself In This Amazing Video Shot By A Drone

Because the cost of fuel is much less compared to the cost of building a rocket from scratch every time, Musk and his team are trying to master reusable rockets so they can get closer to their goal of making commercial space travel more affordable. 

26
Yahoo's new Flickr app adds creepily accurate search tool

As a longtime Flickr user, I’m looking forward to testing this app more extensively. Because the powerful mobile camera in previous versions of the Flickr app were rather sluggish, Instagram has become my default tool for taking amazing photos, messing them up with filters, and then uploading them to Flickr. With the new iOS app, it seems faster — at least in my limited tests — although the camera did crash the app once. To be fair, many apps on my aging iPhone 4S crash when I try to use the camera.

27
http://science.slashdot.org/story/14/04/17/233228/nasa-proposes-water-world-theory-for-origin-of-life?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed

But how does Evolution prune the repication mechanism itself? If an early replicator was very sloppy and mutation prone, then any possible advantages occuring by random mutation would have little chance to be tested before other random mutations overwrote them or other mutations killed off the organisms carrying that mutation. Working backwards, let's start with modern DNA, in cases where there are many additional mechanisms to cut the mutation rate so the non-random part of Evolution has more time to work. Putting DNA inside a walled cell, and making that cell nucleated, both reduce the exposure of the DNA to chemicals that can mutate copies. Multicellularity further shields the DNA from some more mutagens, and lets Evolution prune cells with bad copies by apoptosis, which can't be used by single celled organisms. Right there, we have a trend in Evolution - Nature seems to be trying to reduce error rates to target, as you put it, the Goldilocks range. "Advanced" organisms, such as us, or mosquitos or oak trees, have many features that make the selection rate occur at an optimum, where Nature gets enough time for selection processes to occur.

28
Aereo's CEO on the future of Netflix, TV sports and the public airwaves

Chet Kanojia, the man behind the company that could transform the TV industry, has some very big ideas about how to manage the airwaves and how people will watch television five years from now.

29
Where's my gigabit Internet, anyway?

Those, however, are mostly either local governments offering services only to their residents, or limited promotional deployments from companies like CenturyLink and CSpire. Google Fiber – and, as of this week, AT&T – are the only major national players with active plans for gigabit residential services. Google Fiber is currently available in Kansas City, with plans afoot for Austin, Texas, and Provo, Utah, and more expansion in the works. AT&T announced that it will offer gigabit service to the Triangle area of North Carolina.

30
Smart headphones could be the smartglasses for the rest of us

Johansen has developed an iPhone game called Zombie X, which uses 3D-spatial audio to simulate an immersive zombie attack in a 360-degree space around the wearer. Players have to pinpoint the direction of the attack using audio alone. As the player rotates, the direction of the audio source changes, and once the zombie is right in front of them hitting a button will fire a gun and take the beast down.

31
What Happens To Our Brains When We Exercise And How It Makes Us Happier

Big up on this piece. While I'm with you on starting small, I'd do daily form the get go, even for 5 minutes (heck, even for one!), then increase gradually. (There's a whole amygdala-based reason on why incremental changes are much more likely to stick). The thing is, if you do it every other day, you're more likely to slack off, in a "I'm too tired to do this today, but I'll make up for it tomorrow...", and with that tomorrow being an off day, that new ab machine or gym membership card quickly become mere weights preventing the floor or the counter from flying up in the air. I'm through my second month of one of those night-TV-sold exercise programs (I won't plug it but will say its name has a letter and two digits denoting the surprisingly short routine length - and it's really good). The first couple of weeks were hell - when it came to waking up (the whole euphoria schtick was definitely going on from day one) - but the fact that it was daily surely helped stick to it.

32
It's A Llama Frolicking To DMX, Duh

Honestly, what could be better than this perfect combination of animal, dance, DMX, blue skies and technology? TELL US!! WHAT???

33
How A Nobel Economist Ruined The Residency Matching System For Newly Minted M.D.'s

The Apothecary, a blog about health care and entitlement reform, is edited by Avik Roy, a Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research and a former health-care policy adviser to Mitt Romney. Avik also writes a weekly column on politics and policy for National Review. The other contributors to The Apothecary are: Josh Archambault, Director of Health Care Policy at the Pioneer Institute in Boston; Robert Book of the American Action Forum; Chris Conover, Research Scholar in the Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research at Duke University and an Adjunct Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute; Nicole Fisher of the University of North Carolina; John R. Graham of the Advanced Medical Technology Association; and Jeet Guram of Harvard Medical School.

34
How to spot a liar

On any given day we're lied to from 10 to 200 times, and the clues to detect those lie can be subtle and counter-intuitive. Pamela Meyer, author of Liespotting, shows the manners and "hotspots" used by those trained to recognize deception — and she argues honesty is a value worth preserving.

35
4 Habits Of Punctual People

I am sorry but as much as time is a made up concept, we all depend on it to help us communicate and gather with others. The fact that you think people who arrive early have too much time on their hands, and no respect for their own time shows me that you are most definitely someone who is always late and disrespects other people's time. When I have a class that starts at 830 and I know it takes up to and hour to get there during rush hour, I give myself extra time by waking up a little earlier and this is respect for myself because I hate being stressed about being late for things. I think it is disrespectful when people walk into class late every single day and disrupts my learning. And what about being late for a bus or train... You are actually waiting more of your time having to wait for the next one...

36
Why dieting doesn't usually work

In the US, 80% of girls have been on a diet by the time they're 10 years old. In this honest, raw talk, neuroscientist Sandra Aamodt uses her personal story to frame an important lesson about how our brains manage our bodies, as she explores the science behind why dieting not only doesn't work, but is likely to do more harm than good. She suggests ideas for how to live a less diet-obsessed life, intuitively.

37
Scientists discover the animal kingdom’s first ‘female penis’

Researchers discovered these cave-dwelling insects in Brazil's Peruaçu River Valley. At first glance they're unremarkable, Yoshizawa said, because they closely resemble other cave-dwelling insects in the region. But when it's time to mate, the female mounts the male and penetrates his vagina-like opening using her gynosome — the term used to designate her female-penis. This mating behavior lasts for an impressive 40 to 70 hours, thanks to the female's inflatable, spiny penis that anchors itself to the male's internal tissues. During this time, the female Neotrogla gathers large quantities of sperm that she uses to fertilize her eggs. "Because the female's anchoring force is very strong, a male's resistance may cause damage to his genitalia," Yoshizawa said. "Therefore, it is very likely that entire mating processes are controlled actively by females, whereas males are rather passive."

38
UPDATED: Deal Would Allow Tennessee Bus Rapid Transit Project to Proceed | Autopia | WIRED

The Senate legislation was startlingly specific: Senate Bill 2243 forbade “constructing, maintaining or operating any bus rapid transit system.” Because of the unusual way Tennessee subdivides county governments, the bill applies only to BRT systems in two counties–Davidson, where Nashville is located, and Moore, which happens to be home to the Jack Daniels distillery. It also forbade buses from “loading or discharging passengers at any point within the boundary lines of a state highway or state highway right-of-way not adjacent to the right-hand, lateral curb line.” The House struck that provision and sent to the Senate revised legislation, which would require special approval from the Tennessee Department of Transportation and local government bodies.

39 Court Rules MoveOn.org Can Use LA Slogan To Criticize Bobby Jindal | Techdirt

Last month, Tim Cushing wrote about how the Lt. Gov. of Louisiana, Jay Dardenne, had sued Moveon.org over a billboard that used the state's trademarked "Pick your passion!" slogan. The suit was filled with so much technicality-probing nonsense, one wondered how a judge would be able to look through it without needing a couple of long naps. Chief among the claims was that folks seeing the billboard might somehow think the Lt. Governor was responsible for criticizing the Governor, Bobby Jindal, despite the fact the billboard wasn't meant for commercial purposes, criticized the same government Dardenne is a part of, and clearly denotes the responsible party as Moveon.org. It seemed like a pretty clear attempt to stifle criticism over the technicality of a frivolous trademark claim. More egregious, Dardenne wanted the billboard removed while the case was litigated. Fortunately, while we hear so many stories like this that end up with courts being overprotective of any intellectual property claim, the court has sided with free speech and ruled the billboard will stay up while the trademark claim makes its way through the court.

40
Free: British Pathé Puts Over 85,000 Historical Films on YouTube

British Pathé was one of the leading producers of newsreels and documentaries during the 20th Century. This week, the company, now an archive, is turning over its entire collection — over 85,000 historical films – to YouTube .

41
Plant Breeders Release First 'Open Source Seeds'

At an event on the campus of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, backers of the new Open Source Seed Initiative will pass out 29 new varieties of 14 different crops, including carrots, kale, broccoli and quinoa. Anyone receiving the seeds must pledge not to restrict their use by means of patents, licenses or any other kind of intellectual property. In fact, any future plant that's derived from these open source seeds also has to remain freely available as well.

42
The TheTechNewsBlog Daily

The TheTechNewsBlog Daily, by TheTechNewsBlog: updated automatically with a curated selection of articles, blog posts, videos and photos.

43
My life in typefaces

Pick up a book, magazine or screen, and more than likely you'll come across some typography designed by Matthew Carter. In this charming talk, the man behind typefaces such as Verdana, Georgia and Bell Centennial (designed just for phone books — remember them?), takes us on a spin through a career focused on the very last pixel of each letter of a font.

44
What Your Logo's Color Says About Your Company (Infographic)

The implications of color’s effect on people’s emotions are far reaching, and understanding your customers’ connections to certain colors could increase the effectiveness of your company’s branding methods.

45
OperationSAFE is on JustCoz!

“#childtrauma What can one person do? Help, give, care, share, speak, listen @operationsafe https://www.facebook.com/Ope”

46
Gabriel García Márquez Dies At 87

When he accepted the Nobel prize in 1982, Garcia Marquez described Latin America as a "source of insatiable creativity, full of sorrow and beauty, of which this roving and nostalgic Colombian is but one cipher more, singled out by fortune. Poets and beggars, musicians and prophets, warriors and scoundrels, all creatures of that unbridled reality, we have had to ask but little of imagination, for our crucial problem has been a lack of conventional means to render our lives believable."

47
A print newspaper generated by robots: Is this the future of media or just a sideshow?

Although this is an idea, it is not necessarily original. Syndication is an old device used by many newspapers and it is no different from many other (sort of) tier two sharers including LinkedIn. Someone still has to write the original material that is meaningful to humans. I can re-write the poem by T.S.Eliot “The Hollow Men” using different words…but that doesn’t make it original…probably more of a plagiarist. But in this case you can’t really take the algorithm to court. I don’t think we are in any danger of losing our right to ‘write’ original ideas.

48
Statoil | Partner Webcast | MIT Technology Review

Jonathan Matthews is Vice President of Statoil Canada’s Heavy Oil Technology Centre (HOTC) and is located in Calgary. The primary focus of the HOTC is on delivering innovative technologies that will help make Statoil’s Kai Kos Dehseh Oil Sands Partnership (KOSP) profitable while supporting continuous environmental performance objectives. Prior to joining Statoil, Jonathan spent 20 years working in the Canadian Oil Sands with Shell Canada and Syncrude Canada in various technical and leadership roles. Jonathan graduated from the University of Waterloo with a Geological Engineering degree and a Master's of Science. He is a member of the Association for Professional Engineers, Geoscientists of Alberta (APEGA) and has provided leadership to various initiatives in the Canadian oil sands.

49 Who should win a Webby for Mobile & Apps / Podcasts? Vote now.

Behold the miracle of the Internet. Divine websites. Viral videos. Social brilliance. Heavenly apps. It's all here, awaiting your judgment.

50
Despite Paywalls, Newspapers Still Bled Red Ink in 2013

Circulation growth, mobile ads and digital paywalls narrowed newspapers' losses, but failed to offset declining advertising revenue as newspaper income continued to drop in 2013.

51 Who should win a Webby for Social / News & Information? Vote now.
52 Plan a Trip to One of These Destinations for World Heritage Day
53 See America Project Celebrates the National Parks
54 Research Blog: Lens Blur in the new Google Camera app
55 I, for One, Welcome Our New Robot Underlings
56 Sixteen-Year-Old Artist Wins National Art Competition with Masterful Hyper-Realistic Pencil Portrait
57 Evernote And Moleskine Team Up To Create Smart Business Notebook
58 Here's How Long That Teen Would Have to Pee in the Portland Reservoir to Make It Unsafe to Drink
59 Dutch Student Sells All of His Personal Data for 350 Euros
60 The SpaceX Launch Is Sending Dinosaur Microbes to the Space Station
61 Climbing Mount Everest Will Always Be Dangerous
62 See The Lamest Startup Office In America
63 Crave giveaway: Linksys WRT1900AC wireless router - CNET
64 The design decisions behind the tech industry's beloved anonymous Secret app
65 Karl Polanyi Explains It All
66 SageVoice: Three Easy Tips For Effective Social Media Marketing
67 "Genius Hits a Target No One Else Can See"
68 Sony extends PS4's lead over Xbox One despite 'Titanfall' launch
69 With Bagpipes and Bobbleheads, Rob Ford Kicks Off Re-Election Campaign
70 7 Weed Products To Buy Your Loved One This 4/20
71 Samsung Galaxy S5 review
72 Princeton Whiz Kids Create Open-Source API For Voice Control Assistant, Runs On Raspberry Pi
73 Upgrade Your Screen or Camera without Buying a New Phone | MIT Technology Review
74 Heartbleed Bug Sends Bandwidth Costs Skyrocketing | Threat Level | WIRED
75 25 Companies Hiring The Most Tech Talent Right Now
76 Internet Freedom Crackdown: China Jails Blogger, Shuts Down Sites
77 Lawmakers Introduce Bill To Tackle Misleadingly Photoshopped Ads
78 Kids Are Heroes® is on JustCoz!
79 Awkward Moment Seal Is the Meme for All Your Slippery Situations
80 WATCH: 10 Crazy Discoveries That Science Can't Explain
81 'Unflod Baby Panda' Malware discovered on Jailbroken iOS devices
82 3-D Printed Fabrics Turn Body Suit Into a Wearable MP3 Player | Design | WIRED
83 #Unplug: How to Work Hard and Still Have a Life
84 The Best Jobs For 2014
85 Secret Military Test, Coming Soon to Your Spanish Class - Issue 12: Feedback - Nautilus
86 Wu-Tang Clan fans pooling $5 million to buy sole copy of the group's next album
87 The Internet According to Bill Clinton's White House
88 Ann Makosinski: Unleashing the Thermoelectric Power Inside of You
89 Low Latency 94: Prime itch - CNET
90 Solving Solar Power Intermittency with Mirrors, Plastic Bottles, and Salt | MIT Technology Review
91 The Art Of Essentialism
92 Google Sent Out Broken Glass to Try on "For Look Purposes Only"
93 Retired Boeing 737 repurposed as garage-kept flight simulator (video)