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Bitcoin Core Developers Weigh in on Side Chain Proposal

Would bitcoin benefit from having multiple extra blockchains? Two influential figures think so.

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1
NASA sending Google's Project Tango smartphone to space to improve flying robots

"This is no ordinary upgrade," Terry Fong, director of the Intelligent Robotics Group at NASA's Ames Research Center, says in a statement. "We’ve customized cutting-edge commercial technologies to help us answer questions like: How can robots help humans live and work in space? What will happen when humans explore other worlds with robots by their side? Can we make this happen sooner, rather than later?" Google and NASA have already conducted tests to see how SPHERES and Tango behave in a zero-gravity environment. The partnership began last summer, and a Tango smartphone should be sent up later this year.

2
I analyzed more than a million bitcoin tweets. Here's what that looks like

In an effort to get a grip on how global a phenomenon bitcoin really is, I acquired data on more than 1.3 million tweets, spanning the month of February, about the crypto-currency. Here’s a breakdown of who’s tweeting, where and what they’re sharing.

3
Choosing the best cloud based music app on iOS for your CD music library

For those of you that still purchase music CDs, the following guide will help decide which is the best cloud based music library to access your digitized music library from your iOS device.

4
Moore's law gives way to Bezos's law

I’ll show the math below, but if Bezos’ law reflects reality, the only conclusion is that most enterprises should dump their data centers and move to the public cloud, thus saving money. Some savings occur over time by buying hardware subject to Moore’s Law, plus the fixed cost of maintenance, electrical power, cooling, building and labor to run a data center. In the end, I’ll show how prices are reduced by about 20 percent per year, cutting your bill in half every three years.

5
This Military Robot Can Jump From The Sidewalk Onto A Roof

It moves along the ground like a remote control car, but when the operator wants to get airborne, the Sand Flea props itself up at an angle and fires a piston into the ground that sends the robot hurtling forward through the air at heights of up to 30 feet. That's high enough to jump onto the roof of an average house from the ground.

6
chutsu/mdoc

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

7
Here's a look inside a typical VC's pipeline (a must-read for entrepreneurs)

While it may seem that one percent represents depressing odds for a founder to secure VC funding, in reality, the process tends to help entrepreneurs refine their strategy. If the first meeting didn’t result in moving to the next phase, a good venture firm will provide specific feedback and guidance. Most venture firms stay in touch with founders they have met in the past, and it is exciting when future meetings highlight changes that have led to more traction.

8
Microsoft drops $1.1B to grow its data center footprint in Iowa

Microsoft’s new data center campus will go up on a 154-acre lot over the next four or five years, costing roughly $1.126 billion, according to a report from the Quad-City Times.

9
Sci-fi short film imagines a world without paper

What would our world be like without paper? According to the renegade scientist in "Scattered," a sci-fi short film adapted from a story by author Ken MacLeod, it'd be a place freed from the restrictions of human history. Without the original source documents, mankind would have a clean slate. In this world, "we look to the future, not the past," and some sort of modern human existence could be created based on all of the advancements that have brought us to where we are today.

10
Taking e-mail back, part 4: The finale, with webmail & everything after

*filter :INPUT ACCEPT [0:0] :FORWARD ACCEPT [0:0] :OUTPUT ACCEPT [0:0] :LOG_AND_DROP - [0:0] -A INPUT -s 192.168.0.0/24 -i eth0 -j ACCEPT -A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 993 -m state --state NEW -m recent --set --name imapssl --rsource -A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 993 -m state --state NEW -m recent --update --seconds 10 --hitcount 20 --name imapssl --rsource -j LOG_AND_DROP -A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 993 -j ACCEPT -A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 587 -m state --state NEW -m recent --set --name imap --rsource -A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 587 -m state --state NEW -m recent --update --seconds 10 --hitcount 20 --name imap --rsource -j LOG_AND_DROP -A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 587 -j ACCEPT -A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 465 -m state --state NEW -m recent --set --name smtps --rsource -A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 465 -m state --state NEW -m recent --update --seconds 10 --hitcount 20 --name smtps --rsource -j LOG_AND_DROP -A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 465 -j ACCEPT -A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 25 -m state --state NEW -m recent --set --name smtp --rsource -A INPU

11
Is Microsoft Locking OneDrive Users Out of Their Accounts?

One paid subscriber of Redmond's cloud storage and syncing service says he's been locked out of his account for 24 hours with no specific reason given.

12
This week's new games

The Trials series has spent the last 14 years adding ridiculous spectacle to riding motorbikes over tricky obstacles. Set in the near future, Trials Fusion escalates the visual extravaganza, starting off in vast exploding industrial facilities with drones scudding past and pieces of tracks swooping in at the last second, as you use careful throttle control and balance to land improbably large jumps. There are new skill stages and courses where you need to pull off tricks to score points, but this is still mostly about getting to the end of each track without crashing. There's also an excellent level editor that lets you knock together your own rider-tormenting creations.

13
Florida, Get Ready to Pay Sales Tax on Amazon.com - Personal Tech News - WSJ

Amazon.com said it will begin collecting sales tax in Florida starting next month, affecting as many as 20 million people in the nation’s fourth-largest state by population.

14
GOG.com adds enhanced Mac, language support to select games

Good Old Games added more titles to its Mac library this week, boosting its RPG selection with a few classic titles. Mac-compatible versions of Baldur's Gate: The Original Saga, Baldur's Gate 2 Complete, Icewind Dale Complete, Icewind Dale 2 Complete and Planescape: Torment are now available for $9.99 apiece. Those looking for something a little cheaper could also consider the newly-added The Temple of Elemental Evil for $5.99. If you'd like more chances to play games in something other than English, GOG has also added language packs to a range of titles, most commonly offering French, German, Russian and Polish in its additions. The games previously listed in this post now offer at least three languages other than English, but you can check the full list of added languages for the new D&D-themed selection as well as games like Tropico Reloaded and Rollercoaster Tycoon 2: Deluxe .

15
How Burrowing Owls Lead To Vomiting Anarchists (Or SF’s Housing Crisis Explained) | TechCrunch

Today, the tech industry is apparently on track to destroy one of the world’s most valuable cultural treasures, San Francisco, by pushing out the diverse people who have helped create it. At least that’s the story you’ve read in hundreds of articles lately.

16
http://flood.firetree.net/

http://flood.firetree.net

17
The Slow, Cold Death Of Cable Has Begun

The number of cord-cutters, which Experian considers people with high-speed Internet who've either never subscribed to or stopped subscribing to cable or satellite, has risen from 5.1 million homes to 7.6 million homes, or 44 percent, in just three years.

18
Chinese giant JD.com launches a smart-hardware accelerator

Smart hardware developers will also be able to implement JD’s user account system.This means that end users will be able to control all their smart gadgets from one app. And of course, JD gets the longer end of the stick, as the company will have all the users’ data.

19
6 Leadership Styles, And When You Should Use Them

Not only do the greatest teammates allow different leaders to consistently emerge based on their strengths, but also they realize that leadership can and should be situational, depending on the needs of the team. Sometimes a teammate needs a warm hug. Sometimes the team needs a visionary, a new style of coaching, someone to lead the way or even, on occasion, a kick in the bike shorts. For that reason, great leaders choose their leadership style like a golfer chooses his or her club, with a calculated analysis of the matter at hand, the end goal and the best tool for the job.

20
Our health spending problem is all about prices

His group published Thursday its annual looking at international variation in health care prices. For all but one item they studied, from Nexium to MRI scans to bypass surgery, the United States is always the most expensive. The one exception is cataract surgery, where the United States pulled off the somewhat impressive feat of being the second-most expensive country after Australia.

21
The 'Internet Of Things' Will Be Bigger Than The Smartphone, Tablet, And PC Markets Combined

Intelligent traffic management systems. Machina research, in a paper prepared for the GSM Association, sees $100 billion in revenue by 2020 for applications such as toll-taking and congestion penalties. A related revenue source will be smart parking-space management, expected to drive $30 billion in revenue.

22
A total lunar eclipse is happening tonight, and here's how you can watch

You may have a good excuse to stay up late tonight. A rare total lunar eclipse, where the Earth casts a shadow over the entire Moon, is due to start at 12:53AM Eastern. Our celestial neighbor should be completely enshrouded by 3:06AM, producing an eerie coppery glow as it's bathed in refracted light from Earth's atmosphere. And unlike a solar eclipse, there's a good chance that you'll get to see this event if you're reading this -- most of the Americas will get the full effect, while partial glimpses will be possible as far as Australia and western Africa.

23
New Exoplanet Could Be Earth’s Cousin — Or Something Totally Alien | Science | WIRED

But Kepler-186f might have just escaped all these hazards. It is on the outer edge of its parent star’s habitable zone – where a planet is at the right distance and temperature to have liquid water on its surface – meaning that it might be out of reach of the most dangerous radiation. It would also take many billions of years to become tidally locked. Astronomers don’t know the age of its parent star but if it’s on the younger side, the planet might still have a regular day-night cycle like our own. This is good news because M dwarfs make up around 70 percent of the hundreds of billions of stars in our galaxy. Showing that Earth-like conditions could exist on planets around them is an important point in the search for life beyond our own world.

24
Google's Project Ara wants to revolutionize the smartphone industry within a year

At first blush, it almost sounds like this project only appeals to the same consumers that enjoy building their own computers from scratch, but ATAP insists that it'll transform emerging markets -- more specifically, the 5 billion people on Earth who own feature phones, but cannot afford to get anything more expensive. Today, the division announced that it's planning to ship a "Grey Phone," which is simply a prepackaged device that comes with only a screen, processor and WiFi module. From there, users can easily add and take away components as they see fit. It'll be relatively cheap -- the product would cost Google $50 to make, though retail price hasn't been determined yet -- and users on a tight budget can easily add or upgrade modules whenever they can afford to do so.

25
A 13-year-old eagle huntress in Mongolia

Most children, Asher Svidensky says, are a little intimidated by golden eagles. Kazakh boys in western Mongolia start learning how to use the huge birds to hunt for foxes and hares at the age of 13, when the eagles sit heavily on their undeveloped arms. Svidensky, a photographer and travel writer, shot five boys learning the skill as well as the girl, Ashol-Pan. "To see her with the eagle was amazing," he recalls. "She was a lot more comfortable with it, a lot more powerful with it and a lot more at ease with it."

26
http://billmoyers.com/episode/what-the-1-dont-want-you-to-know-2/

That’s right. We should, we must …give up and roll over! Let your children have a degraded way of life, lousy education so they can lead crime-filled, cynical and shorten lives, easily manipulated to fight each other and welcome their ‘masters’ (think Brave New World or The Time Machine). Terrible public infrastructure, polluted undrinkable water and domestic ecological disaster is going to make us more competitive in the long wrong – you have this all wrong! People don’t need to be healthy or have any kind of security. We HAVE to let these 1% geniuses have their way! Or they will go elsewhere. Give them whatever their greed and out of control egos want – with their arcane ideas about being ‘exceptional’ on the Planet, in the universe! , Let them be in denial about climate change (at least on its impact for the majority of us) or the value of a human life – women’s freedom, children’s welfare — whatever and however they SEE IT. Just whatever you do — don’t let these totally entitled, exceptional geniuses/Masters leave our shores!! There is nobody in the 99% of any talent and we truly can’t govern ourselves without their ‘help’ (at helping themselves — it’s stealing and clinging to so much of it, they do.

27
Facebook's friend problem

In the following days, even a passing meeting guaranteed that a friend request would pop up the next time I logged on to Facebook. I felt popular and informed, at all times abreast of what my hallmates, friends, and peers were up to each day. Writing status updates, browsing photos from the previous night’s parties, and searching for girls who were also into Kurt Vonnegut became a daily pastime. The News Feed was the most addictive webpage I’d ever used, letting me people-watch with X-ray vision.

28
IRS tastes its own medicine, will pay Microsoft millions for Windows XP support

Usually, the Internal Revenue Service is the one getting paid this time of year, but Uncle Sam will be lining someone else's pockets this tax season because of its attachment to Windows XP. In case you hadn't heard, support for XP officially stopped on April 8th , meaning that Microsoft will no longer provide support or security updates for the venerable OS. However, governmental computers can't be left vulnerable, so the IRS will be paying Microsoft millions of dollars for custom support to keep their machines secure and functional. Right now, over half the agency's PCs still run XP, despite Microsoft telling the whole world that it would stop support for the OS in 2014 six years ago. The plan is to have all IRS machines running Windows 7 by the end of the year -- at which point the clock starts ticking on the transition to Windows 8 . No rush, though, Microsoft has pledged to support Windows 7 through 2020. Let the governmental procrastination begin!

29
Facebook Will Now Tell Your 'Friends' When You Are Nearby

You can also share your specific location with someone for a short time period, setting it so your friend can only see your location for an hour or two. For example, say you're meeting up with a friend in a big park. You can share your location with your friend via Facebook and he or she will be able to find you on a map, like so:

30
The TheTechNewsBlog Daily

The TheTechNewsBlog Daily, by TheTechNewsBlog: updated automatically with a curated selection of articles, blog posts, videos and photos.

31
Google’s New Modular Phone May Be the Last You’ll Need to Buy | Gadget Lab | WIRED

Project Ara is Google’s attempt to reinvent the cellphone as we know it. Instead of a slab of glass and metal that you have no ability to upgrade, save for buying a new device, it’s an attempt to launch a phone where all of the main components are interchangeable via modules that click in and out, attaching via electro-permanent magnets. Despite being highly customizable, it will only come in three main sizes, helping to eliminate the kind of device fragmentation that currently plagues Android. Google plans to roll out a “gray model,” a very basic device that costs as little as $50, as well as higher-end handsets that could go for as much as $500 and up. The former will be released first — around this time next year if all goes according to plan — and will likely be a smaller, Wi-Fi-only version. This bare-bones model will be followed by the higher-end ones eventually. But Google’s initial objective is to ramp up a hardware ecosystem that moves at the same pace as the software it runs.

32
Epic Photos Expose Mankind’s Uneasy Relationship With Water | Raw File | WIRED

“If you’re a thinking, feeling human being you’re going to pick up what we’re talking about,” says Burtynsky. “We’re showing you how, in Dhaka, they’re spoiling their water to send leather shoes back to us. I don’t have to tell you that to tell you it’s a problem, because you can see what’s happening to the water, and you can see the chromium laced water is the same stuff that a dad is washing his son’s face with.”

33
Here's What Pharrell's "Happy" Sounds Like Without Music

In much the same way Pharrell doesn't age , "Happy" refuses to go away. So, maybe it was inevitable that the track would be the latest to get the no-music music video treatment. The re-edit is injected with all the footsteps, soft handclaps, awkward mouth-breathing, traffic sounds, and boring everyday minutiae that makes real life feel like anything but a blissful jaunt around the globe. As Gawker's Jay Hathaway put it , "The year's happiest song has been reduced to a lonely nightmare."

34
What It’s Like to Spend 20 Years Listening to Psychopaths for Science | Science | WIRED

Kiehl: Well, more than just getting my ass kicked. I worked with a guy who admitted to me that he’d committed several murders on the outside and would commit more if people would ask. He had a team of confederates. I got a phone call a few days later from the head corrections officer at the prison where I was working at the time and he said “Kent, we’re taking you into protective custody. One of the inmates thinks you ratted him out and is talking about having you killed.” So my roommate and I went into protective custody for a couple days. It turned out that one of his confederates had snitched on him. Once that information got back to him, I went back to work as if nothing had happened. But there was a time there when I was worried about someone taking me out.

35
Facebook to Notify Users When Friends are Nearby - Digits - WSJ

Facebook users will soon be able to receive notices on their mobile app when they’re near friends, signaling an effort by the online social network to play a bigger role in real-world interactions.

36
Employee Equity

Another might be to create a new class of employee stock.  Today, in an early-stage company, common shares are usually worth much less than preferred shares.  It might be possible to create a class of shares with less rights than common and thus worth even less.  The idea would be to convert these shares into common on an acquisition or IPO, but before that, they would be non-transferable and have no value.  If it were possible to create a class of stock that the IRS agreed had next to zero value, it might be possible to grant employees this sort of stock, have them owe a tiny bit of tax on it now, and then have normal long-term capital gains treatment years later when the startup goes public.

37
The 50 Best Employers In America

In creating this list, companies in the Fortune 500 were ranked using PayScale's salary and survey database. Final scores were determined by multiplying six criteria: high job satisfaction, low job stress, high work-schedule flexibility, high job meaning, experienced median pay, and salary delta (that is, how the median pay compares to other companies in the same industry). Since we think that pay is one of the most important factors, we double-weighted pay in our calculations.  Read the full methodology here .

38
We are drowning in data about readers and attention, but which metrics really matter? You won't like the answer

There are more ways than ever to measure traffic, readership, attention and engagement with our content. But all that means is there are even more things to distract us from the important questions about who we are trying to reach and how.

39
How to Retain Mental and Creative Focus

Repetition allows each priority to become increasingly relevant. You probably experienced the phenomenon the last time that you purchased a new car. You researched it, looked at images of it over a long period of time and see it every day after purchase. Suddenly you starting seeing that car everywhere. Did people follow your idea to buy a silver Toyota Camry, or did that particular object become more relevant to you through repeated exposure?

40
T-Mobile's Bobsled brand launches with free Facebook voice calls, much more promised soon

Looking for another free VoIP calling option? Well, you've now got one anyway -- T-Mobile has just announced its new Bobsled brand, and it's kicking things off with a Facebook application that will let you make free, "one-touch" calls to any of your friends around the world. Facebook is apparently just the beginning for the brand, though. T-Mobile says Bobsled is aimed at "bridging traditional telecommunications and Internet-based voice and data services," and it says it plans to expand the service in the near future to include video chat, the ability to place VoIP calls to mobile and landline phones, and even offer applications on both smartphones and tablets "regardless of the carrier that powers such devices." No word on how soon any of that might hit, but you can try out the Facebook application for yourself right now at the link below.

41
How do we smell? - Rose Eveleth

An adult human can distinguish up to 10,000 odors. You use your nose to figure out what to eat, what to buy and even when it’s time to take a shower. But how do the molecules in the air get translated into smells in your brain? Rose Eveleth charts the smelly journey through your olfactory epithelium and explains why scent can be so subjective.

42
The world's dumbest idea: Taxing solar energy

Still, it’s the new customers who will rapidly make up the majority, even in a traditional oil-and-gas powerhouse like Oklahoma. That’s because the cost of solar power systems has been drastically falling for the last five years. Solar installations nationwide are going to shoot up to an estimated 45 gigawatts in 2014, a new record , and are projected to grow even more in coming years as solar prices fall further and fossil fuel extraction gets harder and more expensive.

43
Lawmakers Introduce Bill To Tackle Misleadingly Photoshopped Ads

In this handout image provided by the U.S. Navy, President Barack Obama is greeted on the court by NBA Hall of Fame basketball player Earvin 'Magic' Johnson and Michigan State University assistant coach Mike Garland. (Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans/U.S. Navy via Getty Images)

44
22 Victorious Accomplishments in Stoner Engineering

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 34 million unique visitors worldwide and 15 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

45
The robots of the future won't look anything like the Terminator

Andy Marchese has a lot of fish tanks but no fish food — his fish prefer batteries and compressed air. On a recent Monday, Marchese conducted an out-of-water demonstration of Bubbles, a pool-green silicone fish that sways its tail as cavities on each side of its body alternately inflate, creating a perfect imitation of a carp. It is the first autonomous, self-contained robot made mostly of soft parts .

46
Transcending Complacency On Superintelligent Machines

Looking further ahead, there are no fundamental limits to what can be achieved: there is no physical law precluding particles from being organized in ways that perform even more advanced computations than the arrangements of particles in human brains. An explosive transition is possible, although it may play out differently than in the movie: as Irving Good realized in 1965, machines with superhuman intelligence could repeatedly improve their design even further, triggering what Vernor Vinge called a "singularity" and Johnny Depp's movie character calls "transcendence." One can imagine such technology outsmarting financial markets, out-inventing human researchers, out-manipulating human leaders, and developing weapons we cannot even understand. Whereas the short-term impact of AI depends on who controls it, the long-term impact depends on whether it can be controlled at all.

47
Piggybacking: Marketing for The Age of The Network Effect

Much so-called ‘ growth hacking ’ relies on testing of cause-and-effect and optimization of funnel conversions. But in the early days of a network or a marketplace, startups are faced with a radically different problem. Why will users come on board when there’s no one else there? Why will producers set up shop in a marketplace that is not yet frequented by consumers and vice versa?

48
'Game of Thrones' gets 'Frozen' treatment in new video - CNET

What would happen if the characters from "Game of Thrones" found themselves in an alternate universe where everyone behaved as if they lived in a Disney musical?

49
This beautiful electric carriage is tearing New York City apart

Here in New York City, politicians, activists, and celebrities are renewing a hundred-year-old battle between automobiles and horse-drawn carriages. This time, however, the war isn’t over the future of personal transportation: it’s about the 68 horse-drawn carriages that offer tourists meandering rides around Central Park.

50
Oculus Rift helps terminally ill woman take one last stroll in the sun

After seeing Street View, Roberta compiled a list of spots she wanted to visit virtually, and Pri hatched a more ambitious plan for a VR world complete with forests, fairies and waterfalls. Unfortunately, her grandmother's condition took a serious turn shortly after that, and she died about four weeks later. To preserve her memory, Priscilla created a video documenting her grandmother's early experiences using the device (after the break). It's a reminder that while such devices can entertain us, they could mean a whole lot more to those who can't get around much anymore.

51 Turn the Family Car Into a Connected Fleet Vehicle
52 Artist Turns Everyday Objects Into Clever Artwork With an iPhone
53 Getting To $100M+ Revenue: Understanding The 3 Phases Of A Startup
54 Bake like a Jawa with R2-D2 measuring cups - CNET
55 The Best Free Antivirus for 2014
56 Hands On With Facebook's Nearby Friends
57 8 Modern Gadgets That Look Like They Macarena'd Out of the '90s
58 5 Can't-Miss Apps: Solar Walk for Android and More
59 Retailers Reveal The Last of Us Remastered Release Date - IGN
60 After Google Glass, Google developing contact lens camera - CNET
61 LinkedIn May Not Be The Coolest Social Network, But It's Only Becoming More Valuable To Businesses
62 Carbon Capture Technology Could Be More Important for Limiting Climate Change than Renewables | MIT Technology Review
63 The app men of Odessa
64 The Future of Survival Horror: When the Corridor is Too Dark to Walk Down - IGN
65 9 Helpful Storage Solutions for Small Spaces
66 Twitter embraces its data and buys Gnip
67 25 Companies Hiring The Most Tech Talent Right Now
68 It’s Time to Encrypt the Entire Internet | Enterprise | WIRED
69 US-made headphone delivers great bass and style - CNET
70 Why Vinyl Is the Only Worthwhile Way to Own Music
71 The internet of things is great for chipmakers and a challenge for Intel
72 Robotic Pocket Printer sits in the palm of your hand - CNET
73 Play Minecraft on this Android-powered coffee table - CNET
74 What Should We Focus On Learning In An Age Where Almost All Information Is At Your Fingertips?
75 Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner thwarted by hack - CNET
76 This Little Solar Powered Lantern Named 'Luci' Is Having A Big Impact
77 5 Pitfalls to Avoid When Joining Someone Else’s Startup
78 Music multitasking, part 2: Why music anywhere, anytime, is awesome - CNET
79 Snapchat for Business, How Your Marketing Can Benefit From Photo Messaging
80 How to take a screenshot on a Galaxy S5, or any other Android device
81 Mark Zuckerberg on the shift to mobile and the Great Unbundling of Facebook
82 Hearthstone vs. Rollercoaster Tycoon 4: The Battle For The Soul Of Mobile Games
83 Best- And Worst-Performing Cloud Computing Stocks April 11th To April 17th And Year-to-Date
84 Five Impressions Of Google Glass
85 Republican Candidate Shoots Drone in Campaign Ad
86 Weekends with Engadget
87 Why I must come out
88 Ukraine Deal Resisted by Pro-Russian Factions in East
89 Galaxy S5 is Very Good But Not Amazing
90 Don't Underestimate Big Data
91 The PhD Deluge
92 Scientists Discover Most Earth-Like Alien World Yet
93 Levinux - A Tiny Version of Linux for Education - Mike Levin
94 2015 Nissan Murano Preview - CNET
95 Breakthrough Leadership: Winning Strategies From Amazon, Twitter, J.Crew, and Other Cutting-edge Companies
96 Nuclear Powers Ahead in Some Countries, Falters in Others | MIT Technology Review