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Samsung’s Galaxy S8 is now on sale in the U.S., Canada and Korea with more launches to come

If you've been holding out patiently for the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+, Samsung's newest flagship devices, then your wait may soon be over after the phones..

New 'Guardians' ride will lord over Disney park

You'll dance like Baby Groot inside Collector's Fortress, the "Guardians of the Galaxy" attraction that opens in May at Disney California Adventure Park.

Mercedes-Benz is connecting the Amazon Echo and Google Home to all its new cars

Mercedes-Benz announced today that all of its 2016 and 2017 vehicles in the US can now connect with both Amazon and Google’s digital voice assistants. Starting today, Mercedes owners can instruct...

Ads for Google Home, Amazon Echo are here and they stink

Can commercials ruin the Amazon Echo and Google Home?

3 Irish moms try weed for the first time, carnage ensues

"Are we sharing this?"

A Mind Is Born

This demo is not just technically impressive but I found also evocative of thought and emotion. This isn't just a programming triumph, but an artistic one. The program itself, at 256 bytes, is little more than a "seed" from which the demo (and the Mind) blossoms from. It's so small that the actual execution in memory takes up more space, and watching it play out on YouTube takes up orders of magnitude more; how many dozens of gigabytes were transmitted by all the people who've watched videos of this demo? But what about what we actually see and hear? The visuals start off as Sierpinski triangles, symbolic of both the endless, seemingly-chaotic nature of fractals as well as their order. As the song plays, the fractals become morphed into other shapes. Lines, sharp corners, and occasionally blobs show up, evoking in me images of wrinkles in brains or circuit patterns. The melody is randomly generated but backed by a simple, steady bass rhythm, a similar marriage of chaos and order. The song's climax (at 1:42 in the video) impresses upon me a march of progress as the Mind finally takes shape, formed from random matter and energy and into an entity. We observe the formation of the Mind from the ether not just visually and aurally, but also in the form of the 256-byte seed expanding into the demo flower, eventually taking shape as the C64's home screen.

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Top News
1
Samsung will use Google Play Music as the default music app on its devices

Samsung is giving Google Play Music a big push. Today, coinciding with the retail launch of the Galaxy S8, both companies announced that Google’s music app will become the preferred music player on Samsung mobile devices. The partnership kicks off immediately with the S8. But it technically began a year ago; Play Music was also the default music playback app on the Galaxy S7 , a result of Samsung trying to cut down on duplicate apps that clashed with Google’s services on Android.

2
http://engt.co/2pEJ3gr

3
Samsung's Galaxy S8 has a big design flaw | ZDNet

New for the S8 is a face-scanning feature that is supposed to be the most convenient method of unlocking the phone. I say 'supposed to be' because in practice, it almost never worked for me, despite being very impressive in demos before the phone's launch. More often than not, the face scanner would not see me at all, leaving me staring at the phone awkwardly, waiting for something to happen, before eventually capitulating and putting my pattern in. Samsung also says the face-scanning feature isn't as secure as the iris or fingerprint methods, so not only is it slower and less reliable to use, it's less secure, too.

4
Leak shows Microsoft’s plans for its Chromebook rivals

The minimum spec for a Windows 10 Cloud (which could, apparently, also be christened Windows 10 S) notebook calls for an Intel Celeron quad-core processor or better, 4GB of RAM, 32GB storage – eMMC or SSD – or a minimum of 64GB of storage for a 64-bit machine, and at least a 40Wh battery.

5
Tesla Voluntarily Recalls 53,000 Cars

The reason for the recall is a fault with the electric parking brakes, which Tesla sourced from a third-party supplier for use in the cars. These brakes ensure the car does not move once placed in Park, however, the affected models contain a small gear in the brakes that is prone to fracturing.

6
Woman uses Starbucks Unicorn Frappuccino to spread some magical news to her husband

Given the insane popularity of Starbuck's newest ready-for-Instagram creation , it was bound to happen sooner or later. It seems the first person to try it is an anonymous woman in Arizona who drove through her local 'Bucks and asked the baristas to write a special message on the drink.

7
The 2 most viral giraffe mothers on the internet meet and create glorious photos

April the giraffe's lengthy birth livestream drove people wild with anticipation, with many questioning if she was even pregnant at all. But, after weeks of sitting on the edge of their seats, almost 2 million people got to watch April finally give birth to her much-awaited baby .

8
March for Science: Live Updates from Washington DC and Around the US

We’ll be liveblogging throughout the day. Eric Niiler will be reporting from the March for Science in Washington, DC, while Emily Dreyfuss joins him on the East coast from the campuses of Harvard and MIT in the Boston area. And in San Francisco, Anna Vlasits and Megan Molteni will be at both university-led and city-wide events. We’ll keep tabs on the action at other satellite marches around the world where interesting things are happening—like in Memphis, where two official satellite events are occurring, one led primarily by scientists and the other by activists.

9
Silicon Valley’s $400 Juicer May Be Feeling the Squeeze

But after the product’s introduction last year, at least two Juicero investors were taken aback after finding the packs could be squeezed by hand. They also said the machine was much bigger than what Evans had proposed. One of the investors said they were frustrated with how the company didn’t deliver on the original pitch and that their venture firm wouldn’t have met with Evans if he were hawking bags of juice that didn’t require high-priced hardware. Juicero didn’t broadly disclose to investors or employees that packs can be hand squeezed, said four people with knowledge of the matter.

10
Scientists Are Running For Office Because They 'Want Reality to Be Fact-Based'

Dennis Dinge, an astrophysics PhD who is considering a run for New Mexico’s 1st district, also hopes to apply problem-solving skills to more down-to-Earth issues, like job growth. He’s a progressive who, like Bernie Sanders, thinks the cost of a college education is prohibitively high. But instead campaigning on the platform that college should be free for all, Dinge wants states to look at the data on what types of skilled workers are most needed where, and make specific majors tuition-free accordingly. A person unable to afford full-time tuition, or unable to go to college for free and miss out on years worth of income, might choose to get an education if a job was guaranteed at the end of the road.

11
Get ALL the Mac apps you’ll need for any creative project — for under $30

We all know the Mac is a technological haven for creative types looking for the best arena to employ their artistic trades. Now, you can really pimp out one of the most art-friendly systems around with this Supersized Creative Mac Bundle of creativity apps .

12
The small corner of Reddit where people share their darkest secrets

It’s difficult to know what to think about r/confession. The community inhabits a sort of grey area -- a semi-regulated online space where genuine advice can sometimes live side-by-side with the outbursts of negativity that often pervade forums like Reddit. Depending on the nature of the confession, a poster might be met with an outpouring of support -- or a wall of hate.

13
How to reignite your tech knowledge: Become a college mentor - TechRepublic

While news of the tech talent shortage continues to hit headlines, companies are letting a major source of skills languish: Women with STEM degrees who left the field. But Karen Panetta, an IEEE fellow, professor of electrical and computer engineering, and associate dean for graduate education at Tufts University, found a way to get this population back into the workforce: Mentoring college students on their capstone projects, while updating their own tech and job seeking skills at the same time.

14
Samsung will replace Galaxy S8 units with red screens if software fix fails

Apple’s iPhones, as well as Samsung’s Galaxy S and Notes had similar issues, such as yellow-tinted screens, and vertical red lines on the display. This has to do with the manufacturing process. For OLED panels, it’s difficult to evenly deposit luminescent organic materials on panels, and this can cause discoloring.

15
All the best (and geekiest) signs from Marches for Science around the world

Here are a few of the best — and, of course, the geekiest — signs from not only the March for Science in D.C., but marches and rallies around the world. Because reason rules.

16
Seán Moreau on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

17
Hope Reese on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

18
Ryan Reynolds seems mostly fine with a fan getting his name tattooed on his butt

Ryan Reynolds seems mostly fine with a fan getting his name tattooed on his butt

19
Ring's Wi-Fi floodlight adds an HD camera into the mix

Ring's Wi-Fi floodlight adds an HD camera into the mix

20
iPhone Live Photos: Now Apple opens it up to the web to boost sharing | ZDNet

But, according to 9to5Mac , Apple has introduced a new option to bring Live Photos to the web via a JavaScript-based API for Live Photos called LivePhotosKit. It caters to developers rather than users, but is likely to result in more websites allowing users to share their Live Photos on those sites.

21
Uber: The good, the bad, and the really, really ugly

It has a $68 billion market cap and countless happy riders who can readily articulate why using Uber is better than taking a cab or driving their own car, or maybe even owning their own car. And the Uber drivers get to be their own boss and choose the hours when they want to drive.

22
Kafka channels the big data firehose | ZDNet

Kafka has emerged as the open source pillar of choice for managing huge torrents of events. The challenge is refining the tooling and raising the game on security beyond basic authentication.

23
Torching the Modern-Day Library of Alexandria

Google’s best defense was that the whole point of antitrust law was to protect consumers, and, as one of their lawyers put it, “From the perspective of consumers, one way to get something is unquestionably better than no way to get it at all.” Out-of-print books had been totally inaccessible online; now there’d be a way to buy them. How did that hurt consumers? A person closely involved in the settlement said to me, “Each of the publishers would go into the Antitrust Division and say well but look, Amazon has 80 percent of the e-book market. Google has 0 percent or 1 percent. This is allowing someone else to compete in the digital books space against Amazon. And so you should be regarding this as pro-competitive, not anti-competitive. Which seemed also very sensible to me. But it was like they were talking to a brick wall. And that reaction was shameful.”

24
Researchers find commercial banking apps contain swarms of open-source bugs | ZDNet

One of the most dangerous consequences of lax practices can be found within the financial industry. The researchers discovered security flaws in banking apps, which contained 52 open-source vulnerabilities per app on average. In total, 60 percent of these applications contained bugs which are considered critical.

25
4 critical points to consider when receiving cybersecurity and privacy advice - TechRepublic

Redmiles, Kross, and Mazurek feel strongly that there is a strong relationship between respondents' security and privacy experiences and advice sources; however, the details are murky. "The direction of this relationship is unclear: do people receive bad advice that leads to worse experiences, or do they wait to seek advice until after a negative experience?" explain the researchers. "We hypothesize some of both."

26
The H-1B visa system has been broken for decades. Now workers want Trump to fix it

Trump’s executive order does not increase the H-1B cap, but the administration says it is asking government agencies for suggestions on how to do away with the lottery format, and instead implement a process that favors higher-wage workers first. That move would echo a 2007 bipartisan bill crafted by Senators Dick Durbin, a Democrat from Illinois, and Chuck Grassley, a Republican from Iowa, that has been floated several time with no success. The bill would replace the current system with a preference system that would favor students and those being paid higher wages. A second bill introduced last year by California Congressman Darrell Issa would tweak the hiring requirements so that companies have to show they tried to hire an American for any position paying $100,000 or less, up from $60,000. It would also do away with the exemption that allows companies to displace American workers if their replacement has a master’s degree or better. But it would leave the current lottery system in place.

27
Submersible drone gives us a peek at what’s hiding under the sea

A drone-sailboat-submarine-Bond villain’s wet dream could be the key to getting an unprecedented look at the world’s oceans — and all it needs is sun and water.

28
7 things we've learned about Earth since the last Earth Day

“Our discovery supports the idea that life emerged from hot, seafloor vents shortly after planet Earth formed,” lead author Matthew Dodd said when the results were announced. To be sure, measuring the exact dates of rocks this old is a tricky task, and scientists will likely debate their precise age for some time. Previously, the oldest known microfossils were thought to be embedded in 3.4-billion-year-old rocks found in Western Australia, though there’s dispute over whether those fossils were biological.

29
This Video of 'Muslims Celebrating the Paris Terror Attack' Is Totally Fake

Last night, Paris was struck yet again by a terror attack, killing a police officer and has leaving two other people critically injured . But if you see the video below, purporting to show “a crowd of ‘moderate’ Muslims celebrating the Paris terror attack in London,” don’t believe it. It’s not what it appears to be.

30
Microsoft aims to simplify enterprise IoT deployments with SaaS offering, analytics tools - TechRepublic

Microsoft's new offerings speak to many of the challenges faced by organizations looking to embrace IoT. Microsoft IoT Central, and the related tools for analytics, are an interesting option for Microsoft shops that see the value IoT could bring, but haven't yet been able to justify the investment necessary to do it right.

31
Climate Change Coloring Book won't calm you down

One activity in the book offers the morbid challenge of coloring 20 football fields in under a minute to show how fast we've been losing forests worldwide in the past 25 years. Another activity asks you to trace what the Arctic sea ice looked like 20 years ago and then color in what's been lost since then.

32
Einstein chatbot shows Facebook Messenger's potential as an educational tool

Don’t get me wrong, it’s not like I’d delved into a biography. I learned very basic information, such as when Einstein was born and died, the names of his wives, etc. Still, if I could talk to Messenger bots dedicated to teaching people simple facts about historical figures and their ideas/inventions/significance in a more organic way, the facts would definitely be more likely to stick in my head.

33
This technicolor typeface honors the creator of the LGBTQ pride flag

"We wanted to create something special that would not just honor Gilbert and his iconic rainbow flag, but also give the LGBTQ community a fantastic tool to help them create their own banners, posters, and signs," Ogilvy & Mather's design team said in a press release. "People can now raise the rainbow flag with every letter they type."

34
PewResearch Internet on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

35
Uber and Lyft sued for patent infringement by ‘Hailo,’ but not Daimler’s Hailo

It might sound, as VentureBeat  initially reported, like cab hailing company Hailo is behind the suit, but that’s not the case – Hailo Technologies, LLC is a completely separate entity that has absolutely no relation to the Hailo that built a ride-hailing business spanning multiple European locations, as well as North American market for a time, before being acquired by Daimler and merged with myTaxi last year, Daimler tells TechCrunch. Hailo Technologies, LLC was incorporated this year in California, and also operates under the trade name “Bring,” though we could find no evidence of it having released any products currently available.

36
Five new things you can do with Google Earth

Earlier this week, Google unveiled a new version of Google Earth, an app that was considered amazing when it launched in 2001 but hadn’t really evolved in the same way that Google’s other technologies have. Now, thanks to this latest update, Google Earth is replete with 3D imagery, curated video content, and other features that will either make you want to book a trip to some far-flung part of the world or just appreciate the Earth right from your own latitude and longitude coordinates. Or maybe both.

37
Farming for the future: How one company uses big data to maximize yields and minimize impact - TechRepublic

Foris.io has a mission: Make farms more productive and protect the environment while doing it. With a combination of hardware and machine learning from IBM, Foris.io aims to change the way we farm.

38
Could coconuts reveal the secrets of the great Alcatraz escape?

Earlier this month, scientists from the University of Delft went to Alcatraz and deployed a small fleet of coconuts to see where the strong currents in the bay might carry the tropical fruit under identical tidal conditions. Of course, the coconuts weren't using any prison-made paddles, but they were equipped with technologies that had yet to be invented in 1962: GPS and a 3G data connection to track their every move, bob and drift.

39
Target swaps its shopping carts for Mario Karts - Roadshow

And and the best part of all, the red shopping carts get a makeover to resemble the karts from the game. So customers can get the feel of "driving a real-life Mario Kart" -- or at least their kids can.

40
Shanghai finds new roads with Chevrolet FNR-X concept - Roadshow

The FNR-X Concept is a plug-in hybrid crossover that pulls a great deal of front-end styling from the Camaro and other sporty Chevrolets.

41
How to be green in a high-tech world

Technology uses energy. Switching to renewable sources might not be an option for everyone, but there are still some ways to reduce your carbon footprint while living a high-tech lifestyle.

42
'Not a random idea factory': Why Facebook says its brain sensors are closer than you think

Along with Chevillet's brain-to-text sensor, the second Building 8 project aims to let you "hear through your skin" and is being led by Freddy Abnousi, an interventional cardiologist who previously worked at Stanford. His product will likely take the shape of some sort of wearable, like a vest or armband, that vibrates to convey words into the human brain.

43
Google had more than 90k government requests for data in 2016, calls for new data framework - TechRepublic

The number of requests that Google received in the latter half of 2016 marks the highest number of requests in a six month period that the company has received since it first began releasing a transparency report back in 2010. Being that many of the requests were cross-border, Google called for a new framework to handle and process such requests, detailed in another blog post . While Google didn't present a specific policy, it did note that personal privacy should be a balanced part of the new initiative.

44
How to take a screenshot on the Galaxy S8

As you know, Samsung now uses a digital home button on the bottom of the display. That decision forced a lot of changes, such as moving the fingerprint sensor and using a new button combo to take screenshots.

45
Workflow for iOS: How to use 3 automation workflows that boost your productivity - TechRepublic

Workflow automation in iOS lets you chain actions together into impressive workflows. Learn how to build workflows that can enhance your productivity when using iOS.

46
Twitch’s new affiliate program will let almost any streamer earn money

Twitch today announced a new affiliate program that will let pretty much interested streamer qualify to earn money as they play. Similar to YouTube’s Partner Program, Twitch’s new tier is meant to be available to any streamer who meets a baseline criteria involving 500 minutes streamed in the last 30 days, at least three concurrent viewers, and at least 50 followers. Twitch hopes the program will expand the number of streamers on its platform who use streaming as a means to earn money and eventually even to make a living.

47
Move over, unicorn. These mythical creature also deserve their own frappuccinos.

But we think it's time we moved on from the unicorn. We get it: They are fabulous, colorful, and sparkly. But there are so many other mythical creatures out there that also deserve our attention and respect. Right now these creatures are being overshadowed — even oppressed — by the unicorn, but we're not standing for it any longer.

48
Bill Gates: My kids didn't have cell phones till they were 14

Commentary: In an interview, the Microsoft co-founder says phones still aren't allowed at the dinner table.

49
Free hacking tools start teens on path to cybercrime | ZDNet

The report also notes that many of the youngsters who become involved in cybercrime may not actually understand that what they're doing is in fact illegal. Indeed, one member of a hacking collective which sold DDoS tools and botnet services told police that a warning from law enforcement would have made him stop.

50
3 drone deals you won't want to miss

With prices ranging from $31 to $349, there's a flier here for every kind of, well, flier. Plus: a sweet deal on an ultrawide monitor.

51 Homeland Security warns 'BrickerBot' can destroy unsecured internet-connected devices
52 107 cancer papers retracted due to peer review fraud
53 Court rules fan subtitles on TV and movies are illegal
54 Bath time for Kindle as Amazon's next ereader could go waterproof
55 French voters bombarded with fake news days before election
56 How to turn hardware into IoT by simplifying and securing connectivity
57 Engadget on Twitter
58 Engadget on Twitter
59 Meet the IBM Watson-powered robot that could make your next smartphone - TechRepublic
60 Engadget on Twitter
61 10 great Microsoft Edge extensions | ZDNet
62 A new estimate says Samsung’s Galaxy S8 costs much more to make than Apple’s iPhone 7
63 Google updates PhotoScan so you can take glare-free pics in one tap
64 Apple makes it easier for businesses to get iWork suite and other popular apps for free - TechRepublic
65 Plastc goes belly up after swiping $9M from backers
66 Samsung's Bixby will help you shop, unless you have Verizon
67 Google's new mission: reduce trolling through education
68 Cool dad The Rock shares ambitious list of goals for his 16-month-old daughter
69 This Picture of Earth From Within Saturn's Rings Will Make You Emotional
70 This city installed subway gates on the sidewalk to stop people jaywalking
71 Man turns top deck of bus into dance floor, busts out flawless shapes
72 Eternime wants you to live forever as a digital ghost
73 Apple will return heat generated by data center to warm up homes
74 So, Rob Lowe is the new Colonel Sanders for KFC and you really have to see it to believe it
75 Why is Russia so good at encouraging women into tech? - BBC News
76 THE INTERNET OF THINGS 2017 REPORT: How the IoT is improving lives to transform the world
77 Get ready for augmented reality *everything*
78 AT&T Fiber adds eight more metro areas
79 NSFW TV show launches toy box to distract kids during the many sex scenes
80 The 16 best free PC games
81 Watch this all-electric "flying car" take its first test flight in Germany
82 Virtual Reality Companies Navigate ‘The Trough of Disillusionment’
83 Louisiana's Governor Declares State Of Emergency Over Disappearing Coastline
84 Icelandic is at risk of becoming an extinct language because it's too complicated for computers
85 The 'digital wellness lady' is on a mission to make you unplug
86 Why Steve Ballmer could fix the U.S. government
87 Facebook shows teens that coding is cool
88 WIRED
89 As US prepares to gut net neutrality rules, Canada strengthens them
90 Elon Musk's new plan to save humanity from AI
91 Announcing the TechCrunch Disrupt NY 2017 agenda
92 The Real Reason the Online Uprising Against Bill O’Reilly Worked
93 John Spencer on Twitter
94 Why it's really hard to pitch a green energy startup