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Netflix just invited Bill Murray to spend Christmas with you - CNET

Your holiday plans are set ahead of time this year. Netflix hopes you can join a celebrity cast to save a mopey Bill Murray's Christmas party.

Dog is totally getting this big stick over a tiny bridge, dammit

A dog with an unwieldy stick discovers he can't quite fit across the bridge — but that certainly doesn't stop him from trying.

Report: iOS 9 to Play Nice With Older iPhones, iPads

iOS 9 is being developed to work with devices like the iPhone 4s and original iPad mini, 9to5mac reports.

These bladeless wind turbines shake to generate electricity

Farms dotted with the gigantic spinning blades of wind turbines have become a standard sight on long-distance road trips, but what if there was another way to capture energy from the wind? A...

The Untold Story of ILM, a Titan That Forever Changed Film | WIRED

The definitive oral history of ILM, the special effects powerhouse that revolutionized moviemaking and changed entertainment forever.

Tomorrowland review

Hating on things is fun. Particularly online, where we tend to grade things not by the ways in which they succeed, but by the degrees in which they fail to meet our expectations. A new phone...

Guy hoverboards across a Canadian lake and into history

No, this isn't some guerilla marketing campaign for Back to the Future's upcoming pseudo-anniversary. It's a world record-setting flight by Canadian inve

Cute little girl realizes she will never be friends with this very rude chicken

Kids meet a chicken for the first time. It does not go well.

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/the-women-who-helped-crack-nazi-codes-at-bletchley-park/

New POV video from SpaceX takes you for a ride on Crew Dragon's first flight

SpaceX just released a new video of the Crew Dragon taking flight for the first time from Florida.

3 roommates created a hilarious ad for their $1 garage sale

Roommates Nick, Matt and Rhys created a hilarious ad for their garage sale in San Luis Obispo, California.

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Top News
1
BlackBerry CEO John Chen’s Compensation Falls to $3.4 Million

The pay package of BlackBerry Ltd. Chief Executive John Chen dropped significantly in fiscal 2015, largely because he didn’t benefit from a grant of restricted shares that he had received in the prior year as incentive to join the struggling smartphone maker.

2
Captain America: Civil War Movie Logo Revealed - IGN

In a post on Twitter , Jeremy Renner shared a photo that provides a behind-the-scenes look at the set, in which the Hawkeye actor is sitting in a chair with the film's logo printed across its back.

3
Introducing IGN Plays Live - IGN

In the beginning, there was IGN Plays…and it was good. Thankfully, the next evolution of our Let's Play series is here: IGN Plays Live. And yes, it's exactly what you think it is. A ton of live gameplay with your favorite IGN editors (and not-favorite editors).

4
$50k in Play: 20 Bulbdial Clock Kits

The Bulbdial Clock has been a favorite of ours for years. Developed by Hackaday Prize Judges [Windell] and [Lenore] at Evil Mad Scientist Labs, it uses three rings of colored LEDs to cast shadows as clock hands. It’s a fun solder kit that will take time to assemble. In keeping with that ideal, your best bet at scoring one this week is to post a new project log showing off the solder work you’ve done on your prototype. If you don’t have one soldered yet, that’s okay too. Just post a new project log that talks about the component assembly you’ll be working on. This would be a great time to finally draw up a basic schematic, right?

5
‘Adult’ Dating Site Hacked, Personal Details Leaked

Channel 4 News said it found a database of 3.9 million of AdultFriendFinder.com’s members in an online forum for hackers, including users’ sexual preferences, e-mail addresses, dates of birth and, in some cases, whether they were looking to cheat on their spouses.

6
Internet of Things: Standardization on IP is crucial

Networking from the cloud to the gateway has already standardized on IP. But from the gateway to the sensor -- the so-called last mile -- it's no-holds-barred. It is on this edge that we find the protocols of old: Zigbee, Zwave, Modbus, Profibus and others. To have an Internet of Things, IP must reach all the way to the device, establishing an end-to-end connection, eliminating all translation in its path.

7
13 TechCrunch Stories You Don’t Want To Miss This Week

TechCrunch had some big internal news this week, as we said goodbye to co-editor Alexia Tsotsis and Conference Program Chair Susan Hobbs. In other tech news, Clinkle kicked the bucket, Spotify announced new additions to its service, Apple debuted a new MacBook, and much more. These are our best stories from this week (5/15-5/21).

8
Has Lunch Ruined Your Productivity?

As anyone who has ever overeaten can tell you, what you eat for lunch greatly affects your productivity for the rest of the day. Did you know that it's better to step away from your desk and go for a quick walk after eating? It's also better to eat lunch with other people than to eat alone. Watch the video to find out facts like these and more.

9
Hubble telescope observes freaky antics of 'Nasty 1' star - CNET

Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope say the star nicknamed Nasty 1 (Miss Jackson if...) doesn't behave like a typical star of its kind. Hence its bad-boy image and name.

10
Pac-Man Turns 35 Today. So Here, Have Some Nostalgia | WIRED

Pac-Man ’s ubiquity was our first indication that games were about to become the dominant entertainment medium of the information age. (It also arguably marked the beginning of Japan’s impending pop-cultural invasion of the rest of the world, even if players at the time didn’t know where it came from.)

11
Google makes it easier to buy products in YouTube ads

Ads on YouTube videos are about to get more powerful… or annoying, depending on who you ask. A new feature called TrueView for shopping is meant to make it easier for viewers to learn more about a product or make a purchase.

12
Apple TV rumor roundup: Apple TV service may be delayed over local live streaming

The tech gargantuan Apple is perpetually on the razor’s edge of new technologies — it’s one of the founding pillars that has made the company not only a great innovator, but also a cash machine. However, in tech years the company’s popular Apple TV streaming device, which came out all the way back in 2012, is a caveman … a caveman riding a dinosaur (yes we know that’s not possible). But it’s likely that’s all about to change.

13
Can Netflix Make Your TV Smarter?

To be clear, Netflix does not manufacture its own devices—and claims to have no desire to—but it works closely with manufacturers like Sony and LG to create TVs that make using Netflix an easy, seamless experience. The idea is to apply Netflix's simple and intuitive approach to UI—"I just want this to work great," as Gunderson put it—to televisions, which notoriously lag behind smartphones and tablets when it comes to functionality.

14
21 time-saving Pinterest tools

A free image-editing tool —think of an online Photoshop lite—Pic Monkey can help you create just about any image you’d like, with any feature you might need. You can touch up and edit an existing image or create a brand new image from scratch. And perhaps my favorite feature of Pic Monkey is that you can get started without ever logging in or signing up; just click the “Edit for free!” link in the very top right corner.

15
Microsoft offers Windows 10 carrot, threatens with stick

Microsoft has not spelled out the pricing for a post-one-year upgrade. It will likely reveal the dollar signs closer to Windows 10's launch this summer, if only for SKUs (stock-keeping units) that would allow customers to do a "clean install" on a PC running an ineligible-for-upgrade OS, like Windows Vista or even XP. But the "boxed product" -- which may, in fact, not come in a box per se, but may simply be a small card with a license key inscribed or a key emailed to the customer -- will come with a price tag.

16
The science behind Netflix’s first major redesign in four years

At first blush, the new design doesn't seem markedly different. It's got a black background now, to match what people are used to on their phones, tablets, and TV sets. Those little arrows that scroll through the service at the speed of a glacier are still there, but now they jump between entire rows of choices. And the service does a much better job of letting you see information about a show as you click around, instead of accidentally playing something you only wanted to know more about. Under the hood though, the changes are the culmination of years of research aimed at gleaning every nuance about how humans hunt for things to watch. Netflix has been tossing out breadcrumbs in various configurations, and seeing how we gobble them up. This is the newest handful for us to taste test, and it comes with the hope that we'll feast.

17
http://thestack.com/hacked-adult-friend-finder-database-extramarital-affairs-millions-220515

Casual adult dating website FriendFinder has been hacked with details of millions of users leaked online, according to a report from British broadcaster Channel 4 News .

18
Schools Love Chromebooks, Businesses Still Skeptical

But very few businesses have picked up Chromebooks for their employees yet. In the U.S., only 1.1 percent of Chromebook sales last year were for the enterprise. In Europe, the Middle East, and Africa (EMEA), it was even lower at 0.9 percent, though in the Asia-Pacific region, it was higher at 16.5 percent.

19
Google Explains Racist Maps Results

Chloe Albanesius has been with PCMag.com since April 2007, most recently as Executive Editor for News and Features. Prior to that, she worked for a year covering financial IT on Wall Street for Incisive Media. From 2002 to 2005, Chloe covered technology policy for The National Journal's Technology Daily in Washington, DC. She has held internships at NBC's Meet the Press, washingtonpost.com, the Tate Gallery press office in London, Roll Call, and Congressional Quarterly. She graduated with a bachelor's degree in journalism from American University... More »

20
The Week in iOS Apps: WinIt lets you fight your parking tickets

We can’t vouch for the legal advice you’ll get from the WinIt , but we can say we’re intrigued by the idea: If you get a parking ticket in New York City, take a picture of the ticket, submit it via the app, and let the specialists handle it. “We will only charge you if we fight and successfully dismiss your ticket. We charge 50 percent of the original fine amount. In cases where we have no legal basis to dispute your ticket, or if your ticket is found guilty, we give you the option for us to pay the ticket on your behalf with a 3 percent processing fee.” If you use it, let us know how it works out.

21
Google's Project Fi invites won't roll out to everyone til mid-summer

Google has started sending invites out for its own MVNO phone service, Project Fi , but some people who've registered are going to have to wait a while longer. In an email sent out to users who'd indicated interest, Google warns that it may take until "mid-summer" for each request to be processed.

22
Chrome for Android is now ‘almost entirely open-source,’ letting anyone build a Chromium-based mobile browser

Chromium is the open-source Web browser project that shares much of the same code as Google Chrome, and new features are often added there first. Google intended for Chromium to be the name of the open-source project, while the final product name would be Chrome, but developers have taken the code and released versions under the Chromium name. Eventually, browser makers used it as a starting point; Opera, for example, switched its browser base to Chromium in 2013.

23
More new Microsoft productivity apps: OneClip, Revolve | ZDNet

"With OneClip, it's easy to get back to the stuff you've seen and used. It might be a photo you took, a screenshot you made, a phone number or address you copied on your PC (and really need now while you're on the run) or just an important piece of text. OneClip makes this available to you automatically, on your behalf, on all your devices. A cross device, secure, intelligent clipboard in the cloud. Why didn't anyone think of this earlier?"

24
How To Design An Office For Maximizing Employee Happiness

The paper’s authors write that until very recently, all of human survival and comfort relied on a person’s ability to move. Enter technology and all that hunting, gathering, sowing, and reaping is relegated to the frenetic motion of our fingers alone. Food and clothing: ordered online or via mobile app and delivered to our doors or picked up from our vehicles. A person could go nearly an entire day between work and home and rarely have to rise from a seated position.

25
The Verge on Twitter

Mario Kart: Fury Road is the best Mad Max mash-up yet http://theverge.com/e/8410472?utm_campaign=theverge&utm_content=article&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter# … pic.twitter.com/gB73c4v4L8

26
CRM and Cloud Computing To Grow Your Business - Salesforce.com

Customer relationship management (CRM) is all about managing the relationships you have with your customers. CRM combines business processes, people, and technology to achieve this single goal: getting and keeping customers. It's an overall strategy to help you learn more about their behavior so you can develop stronger, lasting relationships that will benefit both of you. It’s very hard to run a successful business without a strong focus on CRM, as well as adding elements of social media and making the transition to a social enterprise to connect with customers in new ways.

27
Why 30 is not the new 20

Clinical psychologist Meg Jay has a bold message for twentysomethings: Contrary to popular belief, your 20s are not a throwaway decade. In this provocative talk, Jay says that just because marriage, work and kids are happening later in life, doesn’t mean you can’t start planning now. She gives 3 pieces of advice for how twentysomethings can re-claim adulthood in the defining decade of their lives.

28
We need to talk about an injustice

In an engaging and personal talk — with cameo appearances from his grandmother and Rosa Parks — human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson shares some hard truths about America's justice system, starting with a massive imbalance along racial lines: a third of the country's black male population has been incarcerated at some point in their lives. These issues, which are wrapped up in America's unexamined history, are rarely talked about with this level of candor, insight and persuasiveness.

29
Here's What Happened When A Neighborhood Decided To Ban Cars For A Month

After the festival ended, the city also gathered residents for a huge meeting to ask for ideas for more permanent changes. The biggest result: The speed limit was cut nearly in half, to about 18 miles per hour. That meant that commuters no longer wanted to use the neighborhood as a shortcut, and traffic started to disappear. Neighbors also decided to eliminate side parking on some major streets—and parking on sidewalks—which helped encourage people to start walking and biking to run errands. Every month, the community also hosts a car-free day.

30
Once Again, Just Because Someone Used Backpage.com For Trafficking, Doesn't Mean Backpage Is Liable | Techdirt

Singly or in the aggregate, the allegedly sordid practices of Backpage identified by amici amount to neither affirmative participation in an illegal venture nor active web content creation. Nothing in the escorts section of Backpage requires users to offer or search for commercial sex with children. The existence of an escorts section in a classified ad service, whatever its social merits, is not illegal. The creation of sponsored ads with excerpts taken from the original posts reflects the illegality (or legality) of the original posts and nothing more. Similarly, the automatic generation of navigational path names that identify the ads as falling within the “escorts” category is not content creation. The stripping of metadata from photographs is a standard practice among Internet service providers. Hosting anonymous users and accepting payments from anonymous sources in Bitcoins, peppercorns, or whatever, might have been made illegal by Congress, but it was not. Backpage’s passivity and imperfect filtering system may be appropriate targets for criticism, but they do not transform Backpage into an information content provider.

31
Flow, the secret to happiness

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi asks, "What makes a life worth living?" Noting that money cannot make us happy, he looks to those who find pleasure and lasting satisfaction in activities that bring about a state of "flow."

32
Our loss of wisdom

Barry Schwartz makes a passionate call for "practical wisdom" as an antidote to a society gone mad with bureaucracy. He argues powerfully that rules often fail us, incentives often backfire, and practical, everyday wisdom will help rebuild our world.

33
A garden in my apartment

Britta Riley wanted to grow her own food (in her tiny apartment). So she and her friends developed a system for growing plants in discarded plastic bottles — researching, testing and tweaking the system using social media, trying many variations at once and quickly arriving at the optimal system. Call it distributed DIY. And the results? Delicious. (Filmed at TEDxManhattan .)

34
The surprising science of happiness

Dan Gilbert, author of "Stumbling on Happiness," challenges the idea that we’ll be miserable if we don’t get what we want. Our "psychological immune system" lets us feel truly happy even when things don’t go as planned.

35
A broken body isn't a broken person

Cross-country skier Janine Shepherd hoped for an Olympic medal — until she was hit by a truck during a training bike ride. She shares a powerful story about the human potential for recovery. Her message: you are not your body, and giving up old dreams can allow new ones to soar.

36
CICADA Autonomous Deployment Demonstration

The Naval Research Laboratory Vehicle Research Section has successfully completed flight tests for the Autonomous Deployment Demonstration program. The final demonstration took place at the Yuma Proving Grounds, Yuma, Ariz., and consisted of a series of eight balloon-drops at altitudes of up to 57,000 ft, delivering sensor-emplacement Close-In Covert Autonomous Disposable Aircraft (CICADA) vehicles within 15 feet of their intended landing locations. The NRL developed CICADA Mark III UAV is a glider; it has no propulsion source onboard, therefore. It requires another airborne platform to get it to an altitude such that it can glide to its destination. Its lack of a motor and small size, make it nearly undetectable in flight. The CICADA Mark III is a unique vehicle. The airframe is simply a printed circuit board also serving as the autopilot, the first known multi-purpose airframe/avionics implementation of its kind. This novel construction method significantly reduces assembly time, minimizes wiring requirements, and enables the manufacture of low-cost and rugged micro air vehicles.

37
Anderson Cooper: Why "No Plan B" Is The Only Plan

I’m a big believer in creating your own opportunity if no one gives you one. When you work at a company, people there tend to see you a certain way. In my case, they viewed me as a fact-checker—so the notion that I could be a reporter didn’t occur to anybody. Had I asked, they would have probably said no because I wasn’t on the right career path. Sometimes you have to do something drastic to change people’s perception of you. For me, that was hatching a plan to quit my job as a fact-checker and go overseas to shoot stories by myself. I would make the stories as interesting and dangerous as possible, and then offer them to Channel One for such a low price that the stories would be hard to refuse. I knew I could live so cheaply overseas that it wouldn’t matter how little I earned. A friend agreed to make me a fake press pass and loan me his home video camera. I didn’t really know what I was doing, but I figured I’d learn along the way.

38
We're all hiding something. Let's find the courage to open up

In this touching talk, Ash Beckham offers a fresh approach to empathy and openness. It starts with understanding that everyone, at some point in their life, has experienced hardship. The only way out, says Beckham, is to open the door and step out of your closet.

39
Gizmodo on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

40
DealsRadar: PS4 bundles, Fire HD 7, Razer Nabu X and more!

DealsRadar is the go-to destination for all the best prices on tech and games on the internet. We update daily with links to the best deals on miscellaneous tech and games, with dedicated sections for all your favourite products!

41
Try something new for 30 days

Is there something you've always meant to do, wanted to do, but just ... haven't? Matt Cutts suggests: Try it for 30 days. This short, lighthearted talk offers a neat way to think about setting and achieving goals.

42
What Killed The Infographic?

Infographics, it seems, are a dying breed. Except that in talking to a dozen data visualization experts across the world's top studios, I learned that the story is far more nuanced. Once a playground for independent designers, data visualization has evolved into something more mature, corporate, and honest about its failings. The quirky, experimental infographics that once peppered the Internet may be disappearing. But that's only because data visualization, as a medium, has finally grown up and gotten a job. Data visualization has finally grown up and gotten a job.

43
NBA Playoffs: Breaking down the Conference Finals with top NBA analysts

After an exhilarating first two rounds of the NBA playoffs, we now get to enjoy two intense battles in the Conference Finals. Can James Harden and the Rockets come back against Steph Curry and the Warriors? Will the Hawks have answer for LeBron and the Cavs? To answer all these questions we're hosting a live Hangout on Air at 4pm ET on Friday, May 22. Mashable's Senior Sports Reporter Sam Laird will be joined by NBA TV analyst Steve Smith, Bleacher Report's Ethan Skolnick,  and NBA.com's Sekou Smith. What questions do you have about the Conference Finals? Ask them in the Q&A app and we'll answer them during the Hangout.

44
Benchmark Partners Pick The Next Google

The partners from one of the world’s leading venture firms pick which tech companies they feel have similar direction as Google in 2001. Music: "Morning" by Lusky Subscribe to FORBES: http://www.youtube.com/forbes Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/forbes/vi... For more FORBES content: http://forbes.com Follow FORBES on Twitter: http://twitter.com/forbes Like FORBES on Facebook: http://fb.com/forbes Follow FORBES on Instagram: http://instagram.com/forbes

45
On Edgar Allan Poe by Marilynne Robinson

Edgar Allan Poe was and is a turbulence, an anomaly among the major American writers of his period, an anomaly to this day. He both amazed and antagonized his contemporaries, who could not dismiss him from the first rank of writers, though many felt his work to be morally questionable and in dubious taste, and though he scourged them in print regularly in the course of producing a body of criticism that is sometimes flatly vindictive and often brilliant.

46
The brain in love

Why do we crave love so much, even to the point that we would die for it? To learn more about our very real, very physical need for romantic love, Helen Fisher and her research team took MRIs of people in love — and people who had just been dumped.

47
Home | Newsletters | MIT Technology Review

I would like to receive information about other MIT Technology Review initiatives.

48
http://www.instructables.com/id/intel/

Introducing the Intel® Internet of Things hub which brings you the best IoT Instructables.

49
Gizmodo on Twitter

Stratos Card Review: This smart credit card is still too dumb: http://gizmo.do/qrGvsye  pic.twitter.com/rKDsFryKI8

50
What if we prescribed video games, and not Ritalin, to treat ADHD?

With the success, Gazzaley began working on a game about mindfulness, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and, through a company he co-founded, Akili Interactive Labs, another game for elementary-school-aged children that could treat ADHD, depression, and other disorders. One of the initial investors in the trials was the Irish drug company Shire Pharmaceuticals, makers of Adderall. “What we hope is literally in five years that we can drop those doses down, in some cases potentially remove them, and then use a game to selectively activate a circuit in your brain,” Gazzaley said. He also began working with researchers at the University of California–San Diego to develop a combination MRI/EEG brain-imaging device that connects to a game and feeds real-time images of players’ brains into the game engine. Imagine, he said, watching your brain cells fire onscreen in a 3-D animation and having the ability to change the pattern as you watch. The device could someday allow researchers and game developers to tweak simulations so that they actually heal players’ cognitive deficits — even injuries.

51 11 must-see TED Talks
52 The Top Jobs In 10 Years Might Not Be What You Expect
53 These New Greaseless Bearings Can Spin Virtually Forever
54 LinkedIn Founder Reid Hoffman on the biggest lie employers tell employees
55 Patagonia’s Anti-Growth Strategy - The New Yorker
56 These 20 deep, absorbing PC games will eat days of your life
57 Twelve Tomorrows
58 What I'm Teaching my Son about Money
59 A Game of Shark and Minnow
60 The Ultimate Hard Drive Test: What Hard Drive is Best?
61 Exclusive: The CIA is shuttering a secretive climate research program
62 The Ridiculous Jobs Of The Digital Economy, Illustrated As Children's Book Characters
63 Save All Your Photos—Especially the 'Bad' Ones | WIRED
64 Reg Saddler on Twitter
65 7 Step Content Creation Strategy for Epic Content Marketing
66 What to watch out for at the 2015 world's fair in Milan
67 The city that makes Rome blush: 5 reasons why Palmyra's ruins are so important
68 CrowdJustice Wants To Bring Crowdfunding To Public Interest Litigation
69 What’s in This Picture? AI Becomes as Smart as a Toddler
70 The Internet golden rule: Pretend your online sex is already public knowledge
71 Fantasy must shake off the tyranny of the mega-novel
72 With one false tweet, computer-based Hack Crash led to real panic
73 Somehow, "Bob's Burgers" Has Quietly Become The Hottest Destination For Comics On TV
74 12 Habits Of Successful Young Entrepreneurs
75 Apple and Google Just Attended a Confidential Spy Summit in a Remote English Mansion - The Intercept
76 Explorable Explanations
77 Who in the NBA 'sucks at getting dressed'?
78 Neville Longbottom's enormous wand has the Internet spell-bound
79 How Low-Wage Workers Get Hosed On Memorial Day
80 Listen, learn ... then lead
81 For the first time ever, Destiny's weekend vendor sets up in the Reef
82 8 unique summer vacations that won't break the bank
83 Finding Your Tribe Is An Ongoing Quest
84 Microsoft is almost certainly buying 6wunderkinder, the company behind Wunderlist, source says
85 Does Color Even Exist?
86 Teleport Your Real-Life Facial Expressions into Virtual Reality with This Oculus Rift Hack | MIT Technology Review
87 Montblanc to Apple: Our Swiss Smartwatch Will Outlast Yours
88 Tinder jumps into music sales with fake Zedd profile
89 EU dropped pesticide laws due to US pressure over TTIP, documents reveal