Top Videos
Microsoft Band will track your golf game from start to finish

You won't have to worry about buying a dedicated golf watch to track every nuance of your next trip to the links -- a Microsoft Band will soon do the job

Dope is the future of the American coming-of-age movie

Coming-of-age stories are about going through something defining. Movies like The Breakfast Club endure because the experiences they capture, like grappling with identity or awkward sexuality, are...

NASA's Europa mission takes another step toward reality

NASA's current plan for exploring Europa has just passed its first major review, proving that it's feasible, unlike any of the previous ideas the agency'

The 'Bitch I'm Madonna' video is not good at all, not even a little

Not even cameos from Beyoncé, Katy Perry, Miley Cyrus, Rita Ora, Kanye West and Chris Rock can salvage Madonna's 'Bitch I'm Madonna' music video.

Ivory DNA reveals Africa's elephant poaching hotspots, study finds

Biologists at the University of Washington matched DNA from illegal ivory samples to DNA in elephant dung, revealing two of Africa's largest poaching areas.

'Inside Out' review: You will walk out of the theater knowing yourself better

"Inside Out" is a lovingly rendered Big Idea that leads you by the head and strikes you deep in the heart: A beautiful wisdom, delivered beautifully.

A Brief History Of Tinder

TechCrunch is a leading technology media property, dedicated to obsessively profiling startups, reviewing new Internet products, and breaking tech news.

[View All Videos]

Top News
1
Alibaba's Ant Financial valued at $45 billion after new funding: source

Ant Financial sold stakes to external investors, including China Development Bank Capital Co and a holding company affiliated with David Yu, the co-founder of Alibaba Executive Chairman Jack Ma's private equity firm Yunfeng Capital, the person said, adding that they did not know how much was raised.

2
Fearing net neutrality rules, Sprint stops throttling heavy data users

Apparently, the policy reversal isn’t going to cause any sort of nightmare congestion scenario, either. “Sprint doesn’t expect users to notice any significant difference in their services now that we no longer engage in the process,” a Sprint spokesman told the Journal .

3
E3 2015: New Xbox One Backwards Compatibility Details - IGN

During a demonstration today, the company confirmed Xbox One owners will be able to play older titles online with gamers who own an Xbox 360, and also explained a bit more about what functionality the games will have.

4
Brigade Seeks To Reboot Political Engagement In America With Civic Social Media

On Wednesday, the new company finally gave the public a sense of how Brigade will actually work by releasing its first app. The simple, well-designed software for iOS, Android and Web uses the familiar social networking metaphor (you have a personal profile, you follow others) and then adds a twist: along with updates, you're prompted answer questions about specific issues ("agree" or "disagree") and then can try to sway others to change their positions on issues. Over time, you develop a range of positions that can be used to calculate an alignment score to show how congruent your views are with other people, political candidates and advocacy groups. Your participation in discussions will lead to an "impact score" that shows how influential you in convincing others to change their positions.

5
Pope Francis: Global warming is a threat to humanity

Pope Francis approaches climate change and sustainable development as issues that can be solved if action is taken soon, which is in agreement with most scientific assessments of the subject. The encyclical appeals to humanity to act to "protect our common home" and "seek a sustainable and integral development, for we know that things can change."

6
Zesty - Senior Backend Engineer (Rails)

Zesty is re-inventing the way companies serve food. We use serious technology to let every startup provide exceptional, healthy food like Google does. We’re less than 18 months old and we already serve hundreds of companies in the Bay Area, including names you know like GitHub, Heroku and Slack. Every day, Zesty has to figure out exactly the right set of meals to order for each company, balancing variety, cost, health, dietary restrictions, and automatically learning from individual employee feedback. Then, we need to get thousands of meals from a distributed network of restaurants to hundreds of startups, all before lunch-time, using crowd-sourced transportation. This is a massive logistics and constraint satisfaction problem and we’re building deep technology that will let us do it better than anyone. If you’re interested in building the kind of back-end systems that power Uber and Lyft, Zesty is a way to get in on the very ground floor of an engineering team with similar challenges. So far our tech is all built by a tiny crack team of Oxford mathematicians. You’d be one of the first 5 engineers to join and would work closely with our founders.

7
"What Kind Of Tree Is That?" You Ask, Because You Are An Inquisitive Person: This App Will Tell You

Unfortunately, the reviews for PlantNet aren't exactly stellar. And in my brief trial, my results were mixed. In part, that's due to the particularly difficult challenge PlanetNet is working on: Computer image recognition still hasn't entirely been cracked. Computers have an easier time with music recognition, since it's just comprised of rhythms and pitches. With images there's a lot more going on. Established companies like Flickr and startups alike haven't been able to solve it.

8
BBC experiment lets you control iPlayer with your mind

Instead of grabbing the remote or poking at your smartphone, the BBC thinks the future of TV navigation could lie in mind control . For its latest experiment, the broadcaster is testing a brainwave reading headset developed by This Place that lets you launch iPlayer and choose programmes with your thoughts. The device uses two sensors, one on your forehead and one on your ear, to interpret electrical activity as "concentration" or "meditation." Depending on your preference, focusing your mind will trigger a contextual command, such as launching the app or selecting from one of five programmes on a scrolling carousel. Once the app lands on your chosen TV show, you simply have to "think" until a pink volume bar fills on the left-hand side of the screen. The functionality is basic, but the BBC hopes it can be adapted to assist viewers with disabilities. For now it's just a proof of concept, but maybe in the future we'll all be using brainwaves to tune into BBC Two.

9
Edward Snowden Supports Apple’s Public Stance On Privacy

And we should support vendors who are willing to innovate. Who are willing to take positions like that, and go “You know, just because it’s popular to collect everybody’s information and resell it..to advertisers and whatever, it’s going to serve our reputation, it’s going to serve our relationship with our customers, and it’s going to serve society better. If instead we just align ourselves with our customers and what they really want, if we can outcompete people on the value of our products without needing to subsidize that by information that we’ve basically stolen from our customers, that’s absolutely something that should be supported. And regardless of whether it’s honest or dishonest, for the moment, now, that’s something we should support, that’s something we should incentivize, and it’s actually something we should emulate.

10
Russia's Ulmart in talks with funds on private placement - co-owner

ST PETERSBURG, Russia Russian Internet retailer Ulmart is in talks with several funds on a private placement of about 15 percent of its shares, hoping to raise at least $150 million this year, the company's chairman of the board and co-owner said on Thursday.

11
FCC Plans To Hit AT&T With $100 Million Fine Over “Unlimited” Data Plans

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) announced Wednesday that it plans to fine AT&T, the nation’s second-largest wireless carrier by subscribers, $100 million for misleading consumers about its unlimited mobile data plans.

12
Facial-Recognition Concerns Keep Facebook ‘Moments’ From Europe

Facebook is not offering its new photo-sharing app Moments in Europe because of regulators’ concerns about its facial-recognition technology, the company’s European policy chief said Thursday.

13
Major security flaw may affect 600M Samsung smartphones - CNET

Flaw in pre-installed keyboard software could allow hackers to eavesdrop on users' calls and damage handsets, a security company discovers.

14
HP unveils $300 Pavilion X2 hybrid and new Envy laptops

HP's got refreshed laptops for budget buyers and those looking for something a bit more premium. The company just announced its latest Pavilion X2 hybrid laptop, which features a 10-inch detachable screen and an Atom Bay Trail processor for just $300. The big change this year is a new magnetic latch which quickly connects the X2's screen and keyboard, and also lets you easily reorient the laptop in different orientations. Also announced was the new 15.6 and 17.3-inch Envy laptops sporting the latest Intel and AMD processors and double the battery life from last year. The smaller model will run you $630 for the AMD chip or $800 for the Intel one, while the 17.3-inch starts at $1,000. (HP also announced a 14-inch Envy that won't make it to the U.S.)

15
Toshiba's Windows 10 laptops all have a built-in Cortana key

Toshiba just unveiled its back-to-school laptop lineup, and while mainstream notebooks are normally a bit of a snooze, there's at least one detail that makes these worth a second look. Everything in the line, from the $395 entry-level model to the souped-up 4K editions, has a built-in keyboard button to launch Cortana in Windows 10 . Just hit what appears to be a search key in the Function row, and you'll bring up Microsoft's voice assistant, which can respond to commands like "what's the weather?", "tell me a joke" and "sing a song". (With all due respect to Cortana voice actress Jen Taylor , you might want to skip that last one.) Toshiba is not the only PC maker that's chosen to add extra features related to Cortana, but the built-in hotkey is still pretty novel.

16
Major indie labels are not happy with Apple Music

All told, Apple's terms seems to be pleasing most record labels. It will pay out 71.5 percent of its Music revenues to labels (who will then distribute a fraction of that to their artists). That's higher than Spotify's 70 percent, but lower than Tidal. which offers 75 percent (supposedly 62.5 percent to labels, 12.5 percent to artists). Beggars doesn't seem to have an issue with what Apple's offering artists and labels in general, and says "in many ways the deal structure is very progressive." It hopes that "the obstacles to agreement" for it and other independent labels to join Apple Music can be removed prior to the service's launch in two weeks.

17
HP Fixed Everything Wrong With Its Budget-Friendly Detachable Notebook

It’s hard to build a cheap two-in-one PC that doesn’t have something fundamentally wrong with it. Believe us, we’ve looked —lower end convertibles usually have bad screens, flimsy hinges or sell essential accessories separately. Then something like the new 10-inch HP Pavilion x2 comes along. It’s small, costs only $300 and, at first blush, seems to do almost everything right.

18
Cisco to Invest $10 Billion in China Over Next Few Years

The giant networking vendor announced the investments June 17 during a trip to the country by CEO John Chambers and Chuck Robbins, the executive who will replace Chambers next month. The $10 billion represents only the latest efforts Cisco has made in China over the past two decades. The investments will be used to support innovation and development initiatives within the country around such areas as cloud computing. Cisco officials did not delve into specifics.

19
A NASA Expert Is Here To Answer Your Questions About Orbital Settlements

It’s Space Habitats Week here at Gizmodo and io9. Planetary settlements have garnered a lot of attention lately, from caves on the Moon to eventual outposts on Mars (we’re not going to talk about Mars One). Today, you can ask Al Globus, an expert on orbital settlements, about why humanity’s future is in orbit rather than on the surface of other worlds.

20
Amazon's delivery drones could be in the air within a year

Commercial drone operations like Amazon's highly-touted delivery service could commence in about a year, according to a senior official from the Federal Aviation Administration. FAA Deputy Administrator Michael Whitaker told a congressional committee on Wednesday the necessary regulations for commercial UAVs to operate in public airspace will "be in place within a year." That's way shorter than the 2017 start date that the FAA originally figured on. And when the rules are finally settled on, Amazon will be ready. "We'd like to begin delivering to our customers as soon as it's approved," Paul Misener, Amazon's VP of global public policy, testified at the hearing. "We will have it (the technology) in place by the time any regulations are ready. We are working very quickly."

21
How Disney came up with its bubble shooter for Pixar’s ‘Inside Out’

We talked with Tim FitzRandolph, vice president of creative at Disney Mobile, after a screening of the film at Pixar’s headquarters in Emeryville, Calif. He told us how the process worked of hearing about the film and translating it into a mobile game, Inside Out: Thought Bubbles, which debuts on mobile devices today.

22
Elon Musk's life story is more incredible than fiction

Elon Musk's life story is more incredible than fiction

23
OnePlus says its next flagship won't overheat, despite what you heard

"Today, I am proud to share with you that our eagerly-awaited OnePlus 2 will come loaded with the Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 v2.1," starts the blog post from OnePlus. Color us not surprised that the sequel to one of the most sought-after Android phones will come with, well, the processor you expected it to (bar those pesky overheating rumors ). What's more interesting is that ".1" hanging off the end of the processor's version number. OnePlus goes on to explain that it worked directly with Qualcomm to create an "improved" version of the CPU. One the phone-maker claims won't get hot like reports suggest.

24
The Verge on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

25
Mobile SEO in 2015 — everything you need to know

The following are mobile-friendly SEO best practices and considerations to keep in mind while optimizing your website and content for mobile. Take note that not all of these elements are correct for every business; you should focus on the tactics that best align with the current state of your mobile efforts.

26
Microsoft needs SDN for Azure cloud

“When we started to build these networks and started to see these types of requirements, the scale we were operating at, you can’t have humans provisioning things,” Russinovich said. “You’ve got to have systems that are very flexible and also delivering functionality very quickly. This meant we couldn’t go to the Web and do an Internet search for a scalable cloud controller that supports this kind of functionality. It just didn’t exist.”

27
Information Regarding the Keyboard Security Issue and Our Device Policy Update

So the likelihood of making a successful attack, exploiting this vulnerability is low. There have been no reported customer cases of Galaxy devices being compromised through these keyboard updates.* But as the reports indicate, the risk does exist and Samsung will roll out a security policy update in the coming days.

28
FCC votes to subsidize broadband internet for low-income households

Last month, the Federal Communications Commission announced plans to subsidize broadband internet service for low-income households. Today, the commission voted on the matter, approving the addition of internet subsidies to the Lifeline program that already offers both phone and prepaid wireless . Less than half of homes that make less than $25,000 have internet access, and today's vote offers help and provides steps to oversee the process, too. For example, service providers will no longer verify eligibility . That task will be given to a third-party instead. The vote also set the subsidy rate at $9.25 per month for both internet and phone service. Where does that money come from? Fees paid by service providers that are listed on customers' monthly bills . The FCC is looking to ensure not only the program's efficiency, but cut down on fraud and establish a set budget as well.

29
Fitbit shares soar on first day of trading in New York - BBC News

Shares in the wearable technology company Fitbit have soared nearly 50% on their first day of trading on the New York Stock Exchange.

30
BMW's 'Light & Charge' street lamps double as EV chargers

The idea itself isn't new: BMW announced the Light & Charge project last year , but showed them off for first time yesterday at Low Carbon Oxford Week in the UK. Like other smart street lamps, BMW has integrated controls that will adjust the amount of light needed depending on the time of day (like switching off when no one is around). The car maker also says that its new street lights will feature a standard EV connector, allowing drivers of other electric vehicles to patch into its chargers with the swipe of a card. The only requirement for Light & Charge is that lamps are installed where there is ample parking nearby (as they already draw power direct from the national grid), making them perfect for busy town and city centres.

31
4 Ways To Fix A Cracked Phone Screen

Okay, so your phone screen is cracked. It happens to the best of us. The good news is that you don't necessarily need to buy a new phone.

32
You can soon buy a 7,471-volume printed version of Wikipedia for $500,000

“Print Wikipedia is both a utilitarian visualization of the largest accumulation of human knowledge and a poetic gesture towards the inhuman scale of big data,” explained Mandiberg. “Built on what is likely the largest appropriation ever made, it is also a work of found poetry that draws attention to the sheer size of Wikipedia’s content and the impossibility of rendering the encyclopedia as a material object in fixed form: Once a volume is printed, it is already out of date.”

33
A Russian Official Wants To Investigate The Apollo Missions

Calling for ‘international investigations’ into the ‘murky’ details surrounding the Apollo Moon missions is normally the preserve of 4chan and tinfoil hat-wearers. But now, you can add Russian Investigative Commission spokesperson Vladimir Markin to that illustrious list.

34
You'll be able to FaceTime from your wrist on a future Apple Watch

The camera is easily the biggest news. Sources told 9to5Mac that it’ll sit near the top of a future Apple Watch’s display and enable wearers to make and receive video calls right from their wrists. That wouldn’t make the next-generation Apple Watch the first smartwatch to pack a camera — that dubious honor goes to the Samsung Galaxy Gear — but it’d be the first with camera placed in an orientation suited to video calling on a smartwatch (the Galaxy Gear’s faces outward).

35
Final Fantasy VII Remake Wiki Guide - IGN

FINAL FANTASY VII has quickly become one of the best-selling Role Playing games of all time. Combining fully polygonal characters with pre-rendered backgrounds and a stirring musical score by Nobuo Uematsu, FINAL FANTASY VII is a worthwhile addition to any RPG collection. The story centers on the young mercenary Cloud Strife, who is fighting against the evil Shinra, Inc. Along the way, he meets an unforgettable cast of characters such as his childhood friend Tifa Lockhart and the grumpy pilot Cid Highwind. = Wiki Sections =

36
YouTube Wants To Get Into Eyewitness News

Video uploaded from people on the scene can provide crucial context, but these services can also amplify bad information, since many people share before making sure what they’re sharing is real. YouTube Newswire will be fact-checked by editors at a “social media news company” called Storyful, and YouTube is also launching a project called “The First Draft Coalition” to help journalists find trustworthy footage. That project will launch in the fall, but in the meantime, Newswire is already up.

37
The DxO ONE Is A Plug-In iPhone Camera With A 1-Inch Sensor

The DxO ONE is even smaller than the RX100, however – it’s roughly as tall as your iPhone 6 is wide, and only about an inch thick. The camera can swivel around the Lightning port, turning your iPhone into basically a swivel LCD display, and it can capture RAW files, meaning you’ll have lots more flexibility with the finished product in terms of editing with programs like Adobe Lightroom.

38
First Salesforce Wave Analytics App Washes Ashore

Salesforce announced a new Wave analytics app today called Sales Wave Analytics, the first in a line of what the company is calling ‘role-based’ packaged apps for the Wave platform.

39
Vimeo overhauls Cameo into a simple video editor for iOS

As far as video-editing apps go, Cameo isn't particularly unique, but it seems like a fine choice if you want a tool that's simple and easy to use. It lets you import clips from your camera roll — there's no shooting inside the app — put them in order, add text over them, and color them with a handful of filters (they look fine, but never quite as good as you'd hope). The app also includes free music that you can run on top of the videos. The update is being released this morning for iOS, which is where Vimeo says it's focusing its efforts. Vimeo doesn't appear to have immediate plans for bringing Cameo over to other platforms.

40
Coinbase now lets you buy and sell Bitcoins instantly

Instant Exchange is available for users with USD, EUR and GBP wallets. Once you’ve ordered Bitcoin through Coinbase, funds will be withdrawn from your local currency wallet immediately. Receiving Bitcoin through Instant Exchange also credits your wallet automatically.

41
Obsolete Time

We aim to develop a desk clock based on the legendary nixie tubes. We are a team of students studying different area on engineering tackling the challenges of designing a product from scratch. Design choices: -IN-12 Russian Nixie Tubes -Minimalistic -Made of Premium materials -Use of reed switches to allow control while not having buttons showing -Android App to control all functionalities of the clock through Bluetooth Feel free to contact us directly at info(@)obsoletetime.com

42
Cameo, Vimeo’s Video Editing Platform, Ditches Social Networking Functionality

While the new update contains familiar features like easy importing, editing, and HD video support, the redesign notably removes Cameo’s social networking features. Previously, users could follow other filmmakers inside the app and view their posts in a Instagram-style feed.

43
How to build a happy and productive remote team

Even growth-stage startups have been successful with remote teams. Take Olark as an example. Olark has built a 30-person distributed team and bootstrapped itself to a multi-million dollar company over the past 7 years.

44
IoT is the password killer we've been waiting for

IoT, with its tiny screens & headless devices, will drive an authentication revolution. It's a short leap from the kind of two-factor authentication used on the Apple Watch to proximity-based authentication that does away with any user interaction. Passwords are just the canary in the coalmine.

45
Uber says open to being regulated in massive Mexico City market

MEXICO CITY Ride-hailing service Uber Technologies Inc is open to being regulated in Mexico City, a company spokesperson said on Wednesday, as the rapidly growing start-up seeks to cement its expansion in one of the largest cities in the Americas.

46
Sony's Robotic Dogs Are Dying A Slow And Heartbreaking Death

Back in 1999, Sony released a robotic dog called Aibo, a canine companion that didn’t crap everywhere and only ate electricity. It sold pretty well — 150,000 units, despite the $2,000 price tag. Some owners became remarkably attached, which makes it even more sad that Sony has stopped repairing Aibo. Slowly but surely, they’re all dying.

47
Google’s War Against Apps

Google is engaged in a long-term effort to erode the central role of downloaded apps in hopes of regaining some power it has lost in the mobile world. Last fall it acquired a startup whose technology lets people “stream” an app to a phone without downloading it.

48
The Fantastic, Plastic Brand Evolution of Barbie

Barbie made her debut in 1959 as a teenage fashion model and won the hearts of millions across the globe. Changing the way kids play with dolls, Barbie was the first toy that really allowed children to pretend they’re adults. But some believe she may be too adult, with her unrealistic body proportions and focus on beauty. Watch the video to see Barbie’s brand evolution over the years: from controversy in the '60s to the rise of Barbie’s rival the Bratz dolls and the electronic toy market.

49
SoundCloud to limit embedded tracks to 15,000 plays per day

SoundCloud will soon introduce streaming limits outside of its network. Starting July 1, any track hosted on the service will be limited to 15,000 streams in a 24 hour period.

50
Can Samsung crack wireless audio with its dinosaur egg speakers? - CNET

Traditionally shying away from the audio business, the South Korean electronics giant is trying to make an impact with its new wireless speakers. CNET goes deep within Samsung's research facility to see if it has what it takes.

51 Fitbit opens up 52%
52 Apple Scores Big Profits From Watch Bands
53 California reveals details of self-driving car accidents
54 Exclusive: Apple mines big profits from Watch band
55 The 10 Most Livable Global Cities For Balancing Work And Play
56 Blow Up the Tax Code and Start Over
57 Rebranding The Male Ginger As A Hottie
58 A 12-year-old app developer
59 Kingdom of Mount Vema Exists Only on the Internet
60 Color blind or color brave?
61 Which country does the most good for the world?
62 Women entrepreneurs, example not exception
63 Take "the Other" to lunch
64 Learn more about Reg Saddler (ZAIBATSU) on Empire Avenue
65 11 math talks to blow your mind
66 How to make stress your friend
67 Happy maps
68 WIRED on Twitter
69 The history of Android
70 12 TED Talks to inspire smart conversation
71 Gizmodo on Twitter
72 Be suspicious of simple stories
73 Will Advances in Technology Create a Jobless Future? | MIT Technology Review
74 The Battle of Waterloo, as it happened on June 18, 1815
75 Goldman Sachs Tells Interns to End the Late, Late Show
76 Slash Releases New Concert Film As A BitTorrent Bundle, Global Headbanging Commences
77 How A Team Of Accomplished Entrepreneurs Plan To Revolutionize Your Television Experience
78 The hidden influence of social networks
79 Managed By Q Sweeps Up $15M Led By RRE Ventures, Expands To San Francisco
80 The paradox of choice
81 Hitlist’s FOMO-Inducing Chrome Tab Turns Out To Be A Great Growth Hacking Strategy
82 Bookindy Is A Chrome Extension That Hijacks Amazon To Let You Buy From Your Local Bookstore
83 Google Grows E-Commerce Business In Europe With Ingenico Partnership
84 How to buy happiness
85 HoloLens needs more work, but using it with 'Minecraft' is so damn cool
86 Why Sword Coast Legends is the digital Dungeon & Dragons RPG you've been waiting for
87 Zaibatsu Planet on Twitter
88 BuzzFeed Showcases Its Serious Side With A News App And Customizable Alerts
89 Can Typography Help Us Empathize With Others? | WIRED
90 Reg Saddler on Twitter
91 The best coffee maker you can buy