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PCMag Live 06/20/14: Apple iWatch Rumors & Date Your Ex's Doppelganger with Match.com

Dan Costa & Sascha Segan chat about the day's top tech news, including new rumors and details about an upcoming Apple iWatch, BlackBerry news that suggests i...

Fun with a few 9V batteries. (244 of them)

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Top News
1
The Supreme Court doesn't understand software, and that's a problem

The problem, at root, is that the courts are confused about the nature of software. The courts have repeatedly said that mathematical algorithms can't be patented. But many judges also seem to believe that some software is worthy of patent protection. The problem is that "software" and "mathematical algorithm" are two terms for the same thing. Until the courts understand that, the laws regarding software patents are going to be incoherent.

2
With Multiple iWatch Designs And A Host Of Sensors, Apple Could Win Over Smartwatch Skeptics | TechCrunch

Apple’s iWatch is almost certainly coming soon, according to a host of recent reports, and the latest from the Wall Street Journal is that it’ll be offered in a variety of designs and screen sizes, and be loaded with over ten sensors including those that track health and fitness. Apple plans to sell a lot of them – between 10 and 15 million before the year ends, according to WSJ, and the key to that optimism might be Apple’s focus on design, and a desire to release something other than a one-size-fits-all take on the smartwatch.

3
How Amazon is holding Hachette hostage

It is an own-goal masterstroke. It is precisely because Hachette has been so successful in selling its ebooks through Amazon that it can't afford to walk away from the retailer. By allowing Amazon to put a lock on its products whose key only Amazon possessed, Hachette has allowed Amazon to utterly usurp its relationship with its customers. The law of DRM means that neither the writer who created a book, nor the publisher who invested in it, gets to control its digital destiny: the lion's share of copyright control goes to the ebook retailer whose sole contribution to the book was running it through a formatting script that locked it up with Amazon's DRM.

4
After 47 years in print, Computerworld finally goes digital-only

“It's sad to lose anything that has endured so long,” he wrote on Thursday. “But we are merely taking part in the natural evolution of the media industry, like so many great publications before us. Trains, after all, were once powered by coal and steam; Computerworld is moving from paper to electrons.”

5
http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22229744.000-hackers-reverseengineer-nsas-leaked-bugging-devices.html

Ossmann specialises in software-defined radio (SDR), an emerging field in which wireless devices are created in software rather than constructed from traditional hardware such as modulators and oscillators. Instead of such circuits, an SDR uses digital-signal-processing chips to allow a programmer to define the wave shape of a radio signal, the frequency it uses and the power level. It operates much like a computer's sound card, but instead of making sounds or processing incoming audio, it makes and receives radio signals. And a single SDR can be changed to any band instantly, including AM, FM, GSM and Bluetooth.

6
This London bus stop is made entirely from 100,000 Lego bricks

An entire Lego bus stop built to Transport for London specifications has been constructed in London's Regent Street—right in front of a toy store, of course. The route signs, the windows, even the seats are made of Lego bricks!

7
Why The Insurance Industry Is Taking Aim At Uber and Lyft

The conflict between the taxicab industry and ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft has just taken a new turn. Taxi drivers and fleet operators feel threatened by the less-regulated startups, but now they're being joined by insurance industry trade associations, which are alleging Uber and Lyft’s convoluted insurance systems endanger riders, pedestrians, and drivers. Two bills are now up for approval in California (where both companies are based) that could force an overhaul in their insurance models--and result in higher fares for customers.

8
Verizon Wireless eyeing Dish Network spectrum

A top Verizon executive told a group of insiders in the last few weeks that the country’s No. 1 wireless carrier was eyeing the lucrative spectrum owned by Charlie Ergen’s satellite-TV company, a banker with direct knowledge of the conversation said.

9
Landing Google Loon Causes Concern in New Zealand - Digits - WSJ

Google has been testing its balloons – part of a trial known as Project Loon—in the lower South Island of New Zealand this week when one of the balloons returning to earth was mistaken for a crashing plane.

10
Videos from Startup School NY are now online

If you missed Startup School NY, you can now watch the talks on  YouTube .

11
Archos releases new iOS-controlled smart home suite with tablet, cameras & environmental sensors

Consumers looking for an self-installed, iOS-compatible "connected home" system now have a new option from electronics manufacturer Archos, as the company's new Smart Home system has hit virtual shelves with cameras, environmental sensors, and a customized control tablet.

12
TNW Rewind

[{"id":"flipboard-QeZaiU8STsGVfk7815MJag:a:47933081-1403275392","hashCode":118638182,"sortValue":31100350593731,"type":"post","title":"7 Web design disasters that drive people crazy","excerptText":"<i>Gar­rett Heath is a tech­nol­o­gy sto­ry­teller with Rack­space.</i><p>While work­ing on an arti­cle about respon­sive design, I real­ized how frus­trat­ing it is when com­pa­nies design for a desk­top only expe­ri­ence. I use a lap­top for much of my Web brows­ing, but when I’m on the go it dri­ves me nuts when there is a poor mobile expe­ri­ence.<p>This got me think­ing about some of the other UX blun­ders that make us all want to pull out our hair. A poor­ly designed web­site has real impacts, whether page views or sales—faster than Face­book acquir­ing a bil­lion dol­lar com­pa­ny, we bounce away to anoth­er with a bet­ter user expe­ri­ence.<p>Here are seven things that will drive your users crazy.<p>1. Requiring users to signup before browsing your site<p>Noth­ing gets peo­ple’s blood boil­ing as much as hav­ing to signup for an account before they can view a web­site.

13
More punk, less hell!

An assessment of four years of anarchist rule yields a rather surprising conclusion: the punks put the city’s financial house in order. They can also look back on some very successful speeches, a few dozen kilometers of bike paths, a zoning plan, a new school organization (that no one complains about any more) and a relaxed, booming city – tourism is growing by 20% a year (and some say that is the new bubble). In speeches, president Grímsson no longer praises Icelanders’ killer instinct, but their creativity. Real estate prices are again on the rise and the Range Rovers are back too. In polls last October, the Best Party hit its high-water mark of 38%. Shortly thereafter, Gnarr announced he would retire and dissolve the Best Party. His reason: «I’m a comedian, not a politician.» He added: «I was a cab driver for four years, a really good one even, and I quit doing that as well.»

14
JBL Clip: Tiny, travel-friendly Bluetooth speaker adds a key feature - CNET

JBL's $50 micro wireless speaker now has speakerphone capabilities (and a clip on top)

15
Rian Johnson to Write and Direct Star Wars: Episode 8 - IGN

So what can we take away from this news? Aside from the fact that we live in a world where new Star Wars movies are happening with Luke, Leia, and Han!? It’s clear that Disney and Lucasfilm are looking to new blood for these films. With the exception of J.J. Abrams, Johnson, Trank, and Edwards all come from pretty low-budget beginnings and all made good-to-great sci-fi films with limited means. These are filmmakers who have proven themselves, and really, fans couldn’t ask for anything more.

16
Fast Company Is Hiring An Ambitious Associate Events Editor

Our events are not like any other business events or conferences, so this position is really not like any other “programming” role. You will work hand in hand with our senior events editor to drive, develop, and distinguish Fast Company events from the rest. You will work on ways to extend events--whether it is coordinating live chats with confirmed speakers ahead of an event and promoting that on social media to our 1M+ social following … or identifying and executing on experiential editorial exhibits and site visits for our full-day events. This role will be key to building momentum around agenda development and speaker management, which ties to audience recruitment and promotion of the event.

17
Biz Stone on the early days of Twitter: 'You can be nice and successful at the same time'

Yeah, sure. "You can be successful and also be nice at the same time" is kind of the gist of my book. You don't lose anything; you gain things. In my case, you gain notoriety, knowledge, friends. I decided one day that I was going to be nice all the time and see if that got me anywhere. And it was fantastic. It made me feel free to go up to teachers and say things like: "I have a no homework policy, here's how it's gonna go."

18
SoftBank CEO Says Robots Make Peace, Not ‘Terminator’ War - Digits - WSJ

It is a cliche that Japan has more of an affinity for robots than western countries. And like most cliches, it is probably wrong. Yes, Japan has its share of evil robots in movies and manga (Mechagodzilla, anyone?), just as there are plenty of lovable, quirky robots from Hollywood. But the contrast between Mr. Musk’s view on artificial intelligence and Son’s is striking.

19
Watch the miraculous survival of a failed world record car jump

On March 18th, French rally car driver Guerlain Chicherit set out to break the world record for the longest car jump. After calculating 15 different parameters, including altitude, angle, speed, and weight of the car, Chicherit sped down a snowy mountain at 160kmh (99mph) in an attempt to jump a 360-foot gap between a steel ramp and concrete landing. It all went horribly wrong. Chicherit’s car nosedived sharply before landing, sending him flipping over and cartwheeling inside a specially adapted BMW Mini he previously used to perform a 360-degree backflip last year.

20
Box Inc. in talks with TPG for funding before IPO

Online-storage startup Box Inc., three months after filing for an initial public offering, is in talks to raise a round of funding from private-equity firm TPG that would help buy it time before an IPO, said people familiar with the matter.

21
Our Favorite Android, iOS, and Windows Phone Apps of the Week

Getting a restful night's sleep has a lot to do with how and when you wake up. Sleep Cycle uses your phone's built-in accelerometer to analyze how you move in your sleep. It figures out when you're in the shallowest state of sleep and wakes you up then, so you arise rested rather than ruined. This week's updates fix some bugs and flesh out some neat customization features. [ $2 ]

22
Path is back with a new messaging app that can talk to people and places

After a year of keeping quiet and releasing hardly any product updates, the Path CEO is today unveiling the future of the company: a messaging app, an acquisition, and a social network where you can add as many friends as you want. He’s also breaking out numbers about Path usage for the first time in months. The app now has 4 million daily users, Morin says, up from 1.5 million at the beginning of 2014, and handles 10 times more traffic than it did a year ago.

23
Apple said to team up with pro athletes to test iWatch fitness capabilities

Apple has teamed up with some of the sports world’s most notable professional athletes in order to test the upcoming “iWatch’s” fitness capabilities in intense training environments, according to a source with knowledge of the testing. This source says that Apple has invited athletes from the MLB, NHL, and NBA to its Cupertino-based campus on multiple occasions over the past several weeks to brief the players on the upcoming wearable device and provide an opportunity for testing to be conducted in professional conditioning environments.

24
Apple's smartwatch reportedly launching this fall

Apple's smartwatch reportedly launching this fall Apple appears poised to jump into the smartwatch market this fall. According to separate reports from Reuters and The Wall Street Journal, Apple's smartwatch will launch as early as October. Reuters reports Check out this story on USATODAY.com: http://usat.ly/1irgoG4

25
This Company Pays Its Employees $25,000 To Quit — No Strings Attached — Even If They Were Just Hired

GoogleRiot Games HQ in Santa Monica, California. The offer has some minor qualifications. It's only available to North America staff for now, and they have to elect to take the package (which Riot Games has named "Queue Dodge") within the first 60 days of employment. Staff who opt for it will get 10% of their salary up to $25,000. There is a hiring crunch in tech right now, and jobs for qualified programmers and developers can easily start in the six-figure range. Although, it would still be regarded as a huge error if RG had hired someone for around $250,000 and then lost that hire in the first two months.

26
will.i.am - home

Frontman for pop supergroup The Black Eyed Peas (selling 33MM albums and 58 million singles worldwide), will.i.am is a multi-faceted musician and entertainer.  will.i.am’s latest album #willpower has already charted a top 10 hit single and will feature artists such as Britney Spears, Justin Bieber, Lil Wayne, Nicole Scherzinger, Waka Flocka Flame, Diddy, Chris Brown, David Guetta, Baby Kaely and Miley Cyrus.  Throughout the course of his career, will.i.am has won 8 American Music Awards, 7 Grammy Awards, 3 World Music Awards, 2 MTV Video Music Awards, and 1 Billboard Music Award.  Bring the action.

27
National and Local Weather Forecast, Hurricane, Radar and Report

© 1995-2014. The Weather Channel, LLC weather.com® Licensed by TRUSTe Terms of Use Privacy Policy Parental Controls Ad Choices Georgia Org Accessibility Tools

28
Why Finnish babies sleep in boxes

We couldn't wait to get the lid off. There were all the clothes you would expect, with the addition of a snowsuit for Finland's icy winters. And then the box itself. I had never considered putting my baby to sleep in a cardboard box, but if it's good enough for the majority of Finns, then why not? Jasper slept in it - as you might expect - like a baby.

29
Kids are Heroes - Kids are making a difference in this world

By sharing the humanitarian efforts of hundreds of kids from all over the world who are actively making this a better planet for all of us, we empower children who visit our site to become compassionate leaders by engaging them in youth volunteerism.

30
TypeRacer - the global typing competition

Don't wait to get started: the road to becoming a touch typing master is long, but at least TypeRacer makes it fun and easy. To be clear, TypeRacer is not an easy typing game, but it will actually make you a better typist than those easy typing games for kids. It makes you type the same sort of text you would see at typing jobs.

31
A first look inside the ambitious Harry Potter theme park opening next month

Muggles of every stripe will soon be able to visit Diagon Alley and partake in the wizarding world's commercial wonders. The new expansion to Universal Orlando's Harry Potter-themed area comes replete with iconic locations like Ollivander's wand shop and The Leaky Cauldron. Frothing mugs of Butterbeer and plushies modelled after the franchise's more recognizable creatures will of course be available for impulse buyers. And for those looking to add magic into their lives, "interactive wands" can be purchased and used to cast spells in the park.

32
The Teaching Class

No one ever says this, probably because adjuncts don’t want to advocate themselves out of a job. But being adjuncts makes teachers do a worse job than they would do otherwise. When I was adjuncting at Columbia, I remember calculating the maximum number of hours I could spend on my class before I reduced my pay rate to under $15/hour. It was less time than I would have liked to spend, but I couldn’t work for less than that. So I taught differently: I assigned fewer drafts, I held shorter and less frequent conferences, I read student essays faster and homework assignments hardly at all. When I realized I was not going to be able to do right by my students, I stopped classroom teaching. In part, this anecdote is just that—a little story about me. It depends on the particulars of my financial situation and personality. I didn’t want to have a job in which my time was so undervalued that I felt I was either doing a poor job or giving my time away as a gift. But it’s also not just about me. Others have written about how the circumstances of adjuncting force them into grade inflation, or into designing easier courses so that they’ll get better student evaluations.

33
The 100 Best Android Apps of 2014

This App Is Stale While 100 apps is a reasonably manageable slice of the one million plus apps in the Google Play store, it's still a challenge to keep up to date. That's the nature of a platform as enormous and dynamic as Android. We update the list frequently to keep it from becoming an ossified mess filled with broken and unhip apps. Hopefully, the next time you read this, there will be some new gems for you to discover.

34
4 Myths About Apple Design, From An Ex-Apple Designer

It is a very visual spatial company for sure thanks to Steve. Leaders tend to set the environment, and Steve was a very visual spatial person. It's why design is so "centric" to everything at Apple. It is rare to find visual spatial people in a role where they can set the environment for a whole company. Usually that is dictated by the bottom dollar and things like design get set aside. This is why Steve had such a difficult time early on with the board. Apple is an extremely rare company mainly because of the type people they hire. Most companies are managed, and ran by audio sequential people who care more about numbers and processes, rather than design and function. It often shows in how they do business, and the decisions they make with products. Knowing your employees, and how their brains work is key to them fitting in with your company. The HR team at Apple does a good job at finding the right people.

35
Pixel perfect: the story of eBoy

The trio came together here in Berlin during the mid-’90s, and have spent the last two decades honing their craft in meticulous detail, building elaborate cityscapes, portraits, and designer toys, one pixel at a time. Everything they create is governed by the same 8-bit style — a seemingly limited medium whose aesthetic arose from early video game culture — but what happens within those parameters is a mix of exuberance, geekiness, and boyish imagination: robots battle monsters, topless women dangle from street poles, zombies storm an Arby’s.

36
Tech

Biz Stone says Twitter is in need of “creative vision”: Twitter “is going to change, it’s got to change. People, times and culture are changing and so the software that reflects this kind of zeitgeist has got to change too,” he tells The Telegraph. Stone said he had some ideas to share with CEO Dick Costolo: “I do. I’m happy to share them over drinks with Dick, if he wants to hear them."

37
iPhone 6 Rumors: iOS 8 code hints at new weather sensors

In mid-June, 9to5 Mac spotted a snippet of code in iOS 8, which seems to indicate that the iPhone 6 will have barometer and air pressure sensors. The sensors will measure altitude, air pressure, temperature, and other weather conditions. iPhone 6 users who enjoy mountain climbing, hiking, and other outdoor sports should find these added sensors very useful for predicting rapidly changing weather conditions. Since the new barometer feature is packed in iOS 8, it’s very likely that the technology will appear on the iPhone 6, iWatch, and the other products the company plans to introduce this year.

38
Iran Doles Out Prison Sentences to Tech Bloggers, or 'Enemy Cyber Activists'

The bloggers received the following sentences, according to Mashable 's source, who asked to remain anonymous to protect his safety: Honarmand, 11 years; Vahedi: 2.5 years; Hossein Nozari: 7 years; Reza Nozari: 1.5 years with 3 years of probation; Paknejad: 5 years. The other six people, whose identities are unknown at this point, all received prison sentences of 1.5 years in prison with 3 years' probation. (While the five bloggers who were identified appear to have been part of the original group of 16 arrested, it's not currently clear whether that holds true for the unidentified six.)

39
The history of Android

Surprisingly, multitasking and background applications already worked in Milestone 3. Leaving an app didn't close it—apps would save state, even down to text left in a text box. This was a feature iOS wouldn’t get around to matching until the release of iOS 4 in 2010, and it really showed the difference between the two platforms. iOS was originally meant to be a closed platform with no third-party apps, so the platform robustness wasn’t a huge focus. Android was built from the ground up to be a powerful app platform, and ease of app development was one of the driving forces behind its creation.

40
The TheTechNewsBlog Daily

The TheTechNewsBlog Daily, by TheTechNewsBlog: updated automatically with a curated selection of articles, blog posts, videos and photos.

41
Pounding house music, neon lights, and wild dancing — before 9 a.m

For 20- and 30-somethings undeterred by the $25 price tag, Daybreaker offers a wholesome pre-work rager fueled by little more than house music and endorphins. The crowd is mostly decked out in workout gear or in the tech world’s non-uniform uniform of jeans and T-shirts. Chatting up attendees, you hear the word “energized” a lot. Tom Sikes, a Brooklyn musician whose band, Great Caesar, was playing at the event, tells me: “People are mostly just looking for ways to break the monotony, or at least the repetitiveness, of the NYC work week.” He readjusts his vintage Yankees hat. “I actually don’t see it as vastly different,” he adds, “from going for a 7 am run before heading to the office.”

42
8 Super-Specific Steps To Dealing With Gmail Overload

Next time you're checking your Gmail for new messages, ask yourself this: Is my inbox a free-for-all where Amazon daily deals are jumbled with important memos from my boss? If you answered yes, you're probably wasting valuable time sifting through junk to get to the information you really want.

43
An Exclusive Look Inside ESPN's Cutting-Edge New SportsCenter Studio

After three years and an estimated $125 million, ESPN is launching what may be the world’s most advanced TV studio. SportsCenter’s new home, which is scheduled to go live on June 22, has every imaginable screen: taller than a standard basketball hoop; embedded in the floor; seamless; touchscreen. An entire wall consists of LED displays sticking out at different depths, like an art installation. One telling stat: 130. That’s how many more screens the new studio has compared to the old.

44
CDC: 75 US government employees may have been exposed to live anthrax

The CDC reports that 75 employees working in federal government labs in Atlanta may have been exposed to live anthrax bacteria. The exposures took place because researchers reportedly failed to inactivate the bacteria while they were handling samples,  Reuters reports . These samples were then transported to lower-security CDC labs that aren't meant to handle live anthrax. According to  The Washington Post , the mishandling of the bacteria and the resulting exposures were discovered on 13 June. Officials are now treating the employees to prevent infection.

45
Bestselling Author Joshua Ferris Takes on Social Media in Latest Novel

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 34 million unique visitors worldwide and 15 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

46
Jerry Seinfeld

Thank you so much for featuring Jerry in this interview. Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee is not only a terrific web program, but a fantastic idea brought to life. I've watched both seasons and eagerly await the new one. On top of that (and what some of your interview delves into) they feature classic Honda and Acura commercials from days past. It's really intriguing use of ad space, something I bet other web sponsors will incorporate into their marketing in the near future.

47
What The Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast

How could this vision mesh with the life you have? Don’t assume you have to add it on top of the hours you already spend getting ready or that you’ll have to get to work earlier. If you fill the morning hours with important activities you’ll crowd out things that are more time intensive than they need to be. Map out a morning schedule. What time would you have to get up and what time do you need to go to bed to get enough sleep? As for the mornings themselves, what would make your ritual easier? Do you need to set your easel next to your bed? Can you find a more cheerful alarm clock or one you can’t turn off so easily?

48
How Many Languages Do Developers Need To Know?

What's different these days is the extent to which companies embrace new languages to further their specific business objectives—a process that also has the effect of creating a dedicated base of developers who are effectively "locked in" to a company's particular platform. That sort of dual strategy dates back at least to Sun's introduction of Java, which the company promoted as a way to challenge Microsoft's dominance on the PC desktop. (Things didn't work out the way Sun planned, although Java eventually found a home in enterprise middleware systems before Google adopted it for Android.)

49
Still Using :-)? You're in the Minority

group of researchers at Carnegie Mellon were chatting on an online message board; they began discussing what might happen if the cable on their building's elevator were cut, sending the elevator into free fall. What if the falling elevator had a candle in it? Or a pigeon? Or a drop of mercury? And then their chat, as chats are wont to do, drove itself to an absurdly logical conclusion. "WARNING!" someone wrote.

50
Miracle Baby Goat Ditches His Wheelchair and Learns to Walk

Frostie, the baby goat who re-learned to move about with the help of a wheelchair after a near-fatal illness, has ditched his wheels and is walking and hopping around on his own.

51 13 Robots Who Don't Know How to Robot
52 7 Entrepreneurs Reflect on the Ups and Downs of Year One
53 Listen to Every Summer Song Since 1962
54 Adidas Reveals The Brazuca, A World Cup Soccer Ball Two And A Half Years In The Making
55 An Extended Interview With WordPress Creator Matt Mullenweg
56 Six Flags Unveils Tallest, Fastest and Steepest Wooden Roller Coaster
57 Google Is Putting $50 Million Toward Getting Girls to Code
58 Flight Attendants Learning Kung Fu at College in China
59 #Unplug: How to Work Hard and Still Have a Life
60 7 Letters to Write Before You Turn 70
61 The iPhone's 'Kill Switch' Stops Thieves
62 Barack Obama Is First President to Be 3D Printed
63 The New Yorker: Battle Of The Strategy Titans
64 Mario Maker for Wii U - Nintendo @ E3
65 We Need An Uber For Healthcare
66 Rosario Dawson Joins Netflix's 'Daredevil' for 'Critical' Role
67 French Air Traffic Controllers Vote to Strike, Again
68 Health and Fitness Apps Are Growing 87% Faster Than Any Other Apps
69 annyang! Easily add speech recognition to your site
70 Google's Made with Code encourages girls to embrace computer science
71 11 Glasses Tricks Every Four Eyes Should Know
72 Crowdsourced Eco-Volunteers Team Up Online to Save Hawaii's Forests
73 Did the NBA Just Make Its Biggest Move Yet to Put Ads on Jerseys?
74 Those GIFs on Twitter Aren't Actually GIFs
75 What Hackathons Are Really About
76 U.S. Marine Who Saved His Friend's Life in Afghanistan Receives Medal of Honor
77 'Sexy' Mugshot of Alleged Felon Steals Hearts
78 See stars come to life in stunning 360-degree time-lapse video - CNET
79 Lego Fusion Blends Virtual and Physical Gameplay
80 Hashtag Activism: How #NotOneMore Caught Fire Online - Digits - WSJ
81 iWatch with 2.5-inch display, wireless charging and more to launch in October
82 Videogrep: Automatic Supercuts with Python
83 The Amazing Micro-Engineered, Water-Repelling Surface That Lives Outside My Window | Science Blogs | WIRED
84 Attention Gamers: Non-Player Characters Have Feelings Too [COMIC]
85 The best Chromebook you can buy
86 New trailers: 'The Judge,' 'The Knick,' 'Animal,' and 'Dear White People'
87 Starbucks' College Plan: Not as Good as We Thought, But Still Pretty Good
88 Emails Show Feds Asking Florida Cops to Deceive Judges | Threat Level | WIRED
89 The 21 Most Dedicated World Cup Fans in Brazil
90 Scientists Teach Computers the Difference Between Forward and Reverse – In Life
91 In an MMMBop, They're (Not) Gone: Hanson Brothers Talk Longevity
92 Pope Francis Is Not a Fan of Legalizing Marijuana