Top Videos
Photoshop has a new interface just for app designers

Adobe's Photoshop CC 2015 will have a new technical preview known as Design Space, giving smartphone UI designers a simple layout for improved efficiency.

Amazon's voice-controlled Echo is now available to anyone that wants it

Late last year, Amazon announced the Echo, a wireless speaker with a voice-controlled personal assistant built in. We called it "Siri in a box" in our review, and that's a pretty apt description....

Today's YouTube hope-giver: Mama Rabbit defeats snake with kung fu kicks - CNET

Technically Incorrect: More than 2.5 million people have gravitated to a video of a mama rabbit trying to protect her babies. Mama teaches the snake a lesson, and how, with kung fu-style prowess.

'Beat It' cover is powerful with only one instrument

Miguel Rivera boldly takes on a legendary Michael Jackson song with only his guitar.

Women, it's time to be #notsorry about your body at the beach

A new campaign seeks to end the bodyshaming that women do to themselves.

Selena Gomez does a perfect imitation of Taylor Swift's dancing

Selena Gomez imitated Taylor Swift, A$AP Rocky and Shakira during an interview with iHeartRadio.

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Top News
1
Google Music Crunches Your Data to Craft Perfect Playlists | WIRED

Roman’s big plan is to have you open the app, press play, and just listen. The way he sees it, Google Music isn’t just a library or a search engine; its job is to provide music to make the things we do every day, better. Waking up, working out, commuting: everything can be better with the right tunes. Music will now use contextual information—day of the week, time of day, and device, for starters—to figure out what you’re doing and what you might want to listen to. Then, you’ll get a playlist full of songs perfectly tuned not just for you, but for right now. When it’s 2PM and you’re at your laptop, open up Music and you should see something like the “Music with a beat to work to” playlist. Once you’re home and the lights are off, the sexy-time playlist might start playing instead.

2
iOS 9 can delete and automatically re-download apps to make room for updates

Deleting an app from your phone or tablet normally takes all of that app's saved data and settings with it. Presumably, Apple has either devised a way to keep that from happening, or it's using iCloud to backup and restore your data along with the app. It's also not clear whether iDevices could delete and restore, say, locally stored music and video content from iTunes to make room for updates. Even if iOS 9 can only delete apps, though, that should be enough to free up the few hundred megabytes that over-the-air iOS updates require. We'll likely learn more as iOS 9 nears its official release in the fall.

3
New Virtual-Reality Device Uses Eye-Tracking as Interface | MIT Technology Review

Fove, founded by former Sony Computer Entertainment producer Yuka Kojima and image-processing wunderkind Lochlainn Wilson, makes a device that is the first of its kind to use eye tracking as its primary user interface, following the user’s pupils with infrared light. It’s a simple but science-fiction-esque invention. You become Iron Man, able to navigate digital menu screens merely by allowing your gaze to linger on a particular button, or Cyclops, capable of firing lasers from your eyes to shoot down alien spaceships.

4
Virtual Reality Is Finally Growing Up

While that's a true that we have a new era and industry to work upon for a long time, which is VR, and while several VR content and headset creators have showed the best of their abilities in VR at E3 this year, I particularly got interested about the product of FOVE Inc. and what an early jump into eye tracking VR. While the big competitors are there but no one really knows if someone extra-genius like FOVE come out from nowhere and starts to dominate in VR market. In technologies, it all depends upon your creativity and if you have that creative imagination, you can win the game by 10/10.

5
Review: the new Kindle Paperwhite is the best e-reader

There’s a new Kindle Paperwhite out, and it’s just like the old one except for a high-resolution screen. Nobody was really expecting it to happen: after all, before this update, Amazon had a pretty simple, almost Apple-esque breakdown of its Kindle e-readers. There's the low-end Kindle at $79, with a boxy body and no backlight (seriously, don't buy this one). There's the high-end Kindle Voyage with a high-contrast "micro-etched" glass screen and an adaptive light sensor at $199 (quite pricey). And then there's the Kindle Paperwhite; at $119 it lands in the sweet spot of features and price.

6
Instagram's Overhauled Search: Real-Time Instead of Real Bad | WIRED

This kind of real-time visual stream was the goal all along, he explained. Early on, he and cofounder Mike Krieger “had this vision that if we could grow large enough and have a system that allowed people to tag who they were with, they could see what is happening right now.” He used the example of Hurricane Sandy, a storm that decimated parts of New York City two-and-a-half years ago. Even back then, traditional media outlets featured images from Instagram as part of their storm coverage. “But if you wanted to see photos, you had to know Sandy [was happening in the first place] and and to go look for that hashtag,” said Systrom. “We want to be the first place to cover it, and to have broad reach to cover the real things happening on the ground.”

7
5 Ways Cities Can Become More Active (And No, You Won't Have To Walk Everywhere)

A new report from Designed to Move —a coalition that was founded by Nike and now includes more than 80 sports and health organizations—makes this point conclusively, laying out streams of evidence for the relationship between "active environments" and healthier populations. And, in fact, it even makes an economic claim: That cities are more productive and competitive when they make themselves "more active." That's because new bike lanes and walkways have been shown to spur retail trade, and because denser, walkable downtowns have been shown to produce more tax dollars than less dense environments. In total, the report cities 521 academic findings (mostly journal papers) from 17 countries. If nothing else, the report is a useful source of information for any wanting to promote active development.

8
Google Inceptionism may be cooler than the real thing

It may not be quite the same thing as planting an idea in a dreaming mind, but it stands to argue that this form of inception is even cooler. In a fascinating leap forward in the realm of artificial intelligence, the Google research lab has effectively “trained” artificial neural networks  by showing them millions of images whose features are recognized by layers of artificial neurons. Each layer recognizes an additional aspect of the image until the final output is reached. Taken all at once, the process allows for an artificially intelligent system to recognize a picture, but Google wanted to know at each individual stage. And that’s where things got cool.

9
What does the future hold for Microsoft Dynamics?

Scavo argues that this is the direction Microsoft was already highlighting for Dynamics at Convergence, which has shifted from being an event purely covering Dynamics to one where Microsoft showcases its range of business solutions. “For example, there was a presentation by Ford on its connected car initiative using Azure. Ford is a Dynamics customer, but that’s only a small part of how it’s leveraging Microsoft technologies. Likewise, WASH Multifamily Laundry Systems is a Dynamics CRM and GP customer, but it shared about its use of other Microsoft products, including Azure and Machine Learning, to analyze data from its field locations. Microsoft is one of the few vendors that can bring such a wide variety of technologies to business customers, but having Dynamics as a self-contained business unit really didn’t promote those synergies. The new organizational model is much better aligned to the One Microsoft strategy.”

10
Lapface is a lo-fi streaming community to show you're working

It’s a simple idea and unlikely to become the next great online hangout or trouble Periscope, but there’s something really sweet about Lapface and getting a snapshot into other people’s worlds.

11
Microrobotic tentacles pick up bugs without squishing them

Some researchers develop soft robots , while others specialize on building tiny ones. This robotic tentacle by a team of engineers from Iowa State University, however, is both soft and tiny. In fact, that's a true-to-size ant encircled by the tentacle in the picture above and not a scaled-up version of the bug. Associate electrical/computer engineering professor Jaeyoun (Jay) Kim wanted to "pioneer new work in the field with both microscale and soft robotics." So, he and his team set out to make microtubes using a silicon-based material called PDMS, measuring 8 millimeters in length and less than a hundredth of an inch in width.

12
Eternify tricks Spotify into paying bands more with 30-second loops (update)

If you don't mind completely ignoring the service's terms for a little extra dough from Spotify , Eternify can lend a hand. The website games the streaming service's payouts by streaming 30-second clips from an artist on an endless loop, which, of course, is a complete violation of the streaming service's terms and conditions. It's the work of the band Ohm and Sport , and the site's plays aim to boost an artist's royalties by keeping its catalog going for as long as you can stand it.

13
Taylor Swift Wins!

UPDATE: No bad blood here! On Sunday evening, Apple responded to Taylor Swift's rallying cry to fairly compensate artists. "We hear you @taylorswift13 and indie artists," Apple's Senior Vice President of Internet Software and Services Eddy Cue tweeted .

14
China says up to United States to resume cyber security talks

BEIJING It is up to the United States to create conditions to resume regular talks on cyber security, China's foreign ministry said on Tuesday, as the two countries began three days of high-level meetings in Washington.

15
Google is funding a plan to bring free Wi-Fi to NYC

“By bringing these two industry leaders together, Intersection will help make cities connected places where you can walk down any street and access free ultra high-speed Wi-Fi, find transit and wayfinding information, access information about city services — the possibilities are endless," Doctoroff says in a company press release.

16
10 Tips to Help You Get the Most Out of Windows 10

1. Customize the Start Menu Windows 10's reprise of the Start menu, which dates 20 years back to Windows 95, has been a much-applauded feature of Microsoft's next operating system. But it's not a simple return to the old Windows XP-style Start menu. Instead, Windows 10 combines the tiles of Windows 8's modern, touch-friendly user interface with the earlier metaphor. Maybe you want more tiles, maybe fewer or none. You can have the new Start menu your way: Simply click and hold the cursor on the edge of the Start box and drag it to the size you want. As with Windows 8, you can also pin any applications—including traditional desktop ones—to tiles. If you tap All Apps, you'll see a small tile for every single program on the computer, and you can pin any with a right-click option.

17
US, UK spies said to attack security software

The spies sought to reverse-engineer Kaspersky’s software: according to a warrant renewal request published by The Intercept, the British spy agency saw Kaspersky’s software as a barrier to its intelligence gathering processes, and needed to reverse- engineer it to find ways to get around it.

18
Instagram Blacklisted In North Korea

PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — Warnings are appearing on Instagram accounts in North Korea that say access to the popular photo-sharing app is being denied and that the site is blacklisted for harmful content.

19
Watsi is hiring a full-stack engineer

We’re looking for a full-stack engineer to join our eight-person team in San Francisco. The ideal candidate is a self-directed, product-focused generalist who’s excited to work on whatever is needed to bring healthcare to the world –everything from optimizing donation flows to designing a patient management system for hospitals around the world.

20
New Apple patent could hide iPhone 6's ugly antenna cutouts

The patent is for technology that would make the plastic antennas in the phones look like metal, creating the illusion of one smooth continuous piece of aluminum. The new material wouldn't interfere with any wireless signals or touchscreens, the company states in the patent.

21
Here's Shia LaBeouf as Every Doctor from Doctor Who - IGN

Artist Brandon Bird is responsible for these uncanny portraits and is selling each original oil painting, along with art prints and posters of Shia as the various Time Lords, over at his website .

22
Epson Perfection V800 Photo

Although the Epson Perfection V800 Photo ($739.99) is a flatbed scanner —and can scan photographic prints— its real value is as a film scanner. It can handle both positive and negative film (including slides) in sizes ranging from 35mm to as large as 8 by 10 inches. You don't have to look any further than the price to know that it's aimed at serious photographers who insist on high-quality scans. More important, it delivers enough to make it our Editors' Choice for a top-quality film scanner, particularly for prosumers.

23
Microsoft made a better YouTube search engine than Google

YouTube might never be dethroned as the king of online video, but Microsoft has just made a compelling case for visiting Bing before you watch anything on YouTube.

24
Taylor Swift called out as a hypocrite following her demand that Apple pay artists

Jason Sheldon, a U.K.-based photographer posted his response online, pulling excerpts from Swift’s original letter to make his case against her. Specifically, he takes issue with the fact that any photos photographers take at Swift’s concerts can be used by her team because she is “granted free and unlimited use of [their] work, worldwide, in perpetuity,” while the photographers’ own use of the images is heavily restricted. “If you don’t like being exploited, that’s great — make a huge statement about it, and you’ll have my support,” writes Sheldon. “But how about making sure you’re not guilty of the very same tactic before you have a pop at someone else?” He goes on to ask that she change her policy. “Like Apple, you can afford to pay for photographs so please stop forcing us to hand them over to you while you prevent us from publishing them more than once, ever,” he writes.

25
Twitter tells Jack Dorsey: you can't be CEO if you keep running Square

There's a lot that you can make of the comments, but the gist is that Dorsey is far from guaranteed the job. If both Twitter and Dorsey stand by what they're saying, then it would seem that Dorsey absolutely won't be the next full-time CEO. Of course, it's always possible that Dorsey will change his mind and offer to take a smaller role at Square or that Twitter will grow more comfortable with the idea of him running two companies at once. Nothing is set in stone, but, right now, Twitter wants investors to know that Dorsey doesn't meet its requirements.

26
PayPal's head of design: 'If a page is not functional, it's not worthwhile'

PayPal’s business depends more on its servers than its interface. However, in recent times, PayPal has taken a closer look at its design and how it can still remain simple and functional, as it redefines itself as it tries to redefine itself as a software platform independent of eBay.

27
How They Made True Detective's Opening Credits So Eerie | WIRED

This surreal form of motion produces the effect of being in a dream, while the ambiguity of the images—a lifeguard station set against wildly flowing hair, a freeway running through a silhouette of a face, black-and-white footage of a solar flare—give a brooding sense of what’s to come without revealing too much. As Clair explains it, the best opening sequences tend to be a hyper-intense visual distillation of the ideas and emotions. It has to pack into a minute and a half what a narrative might take multiple episodes to communicate. “The story of these characters’ lives are more detailed and messier and chaotic,” he says of season two. “They’re really lives that are falling apart, and that’s what we tried to capture with the visuals here.”

28
Toshiba accounting problems extended to chip, PC ops - Nikkei

TOKYO Toshiba Corp's semiconductor and personal computer businesses were also affected by accounting irregularities, which is likely to force the Japanese industrial conglomerate to revise down profit further, the Nikkei business daily reported.

29
Netflix Declares 7-for-1 Stock Split After S&P-Leading Run

Netflix Inc. declared a 7-for-1 stock split, rewarding shareholders after its stock doubled this year to lead the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index.

30
IGN on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

31
WPP, Daily Mail, Snapchat Partner to Launch Content Marketing Company Truffle Pig

Mr. Jutkowitz added that Truffle Pig will allow ad clients to receive content production, strategy and distribution from a single entity, rather than requiring them to work with numerous partners—a factor that he think will make a difference for the new company. “When you put all these things together in one place, it turn into something different,” he said.”It isn’t up to every agency to create every single piece of content under its roof in the new era.”

32
The psychology of emojis

In order to know how emojis could fit into your communication, think about your audience and how they speak to one another and to you. Are they quick and to the point, or are they chatty? Do they use slang or any distinct vernacular? Having a detailed set of personas can be really helpful here!

33
Square's Apple Pay Reader Shows How We Pay Is Still in Flux | WIRED

According to Jesse Dorogusker, who oversaw the creation of the new reader as Square’s head of hardware, the tests revealed some “weird” behavior among those paying for some mighty good coffee with their personal Apple gadgets. Some people touched their wrists to the reader with their Apple Watches facing up, before realizing that the Watch doesn’t send a payment unless it’s facing down. “I’ve seen it,” Dorogusker says, shrugging his shoulders. “The new ritual is something we have to fine tune.” And sometimes, when they positioned their phones and Watches in the correct way and a payment went through flawlessly, they’re weren’t quite sure that it had. By the time they looked at their phone or watch display, he says, the notification saying they had paid successfully was already gone. “You have to adapt to the experience being too fast.”

34
Building Nuclide, a unified developer experience

At this year's F8, Facebook's developer conference, our infrastructure team talked about Nuclide, a project designed to provide a unified developer experience for engineers throughout the company — whether they work on native iOS apps, on React and React Native code, or on Hack to run on our HHVM web servers.

35
Hulu Will Sell Showtime on the Web, Too -- At a 20 Percent Discount

The 20 percent difference in the two plans, announced today, says a lot about Hulu’s ambitions to build up its TV-on-the-Web service: Hulu says it will pay for the $2 discount out of its own pocket, in the hope of convincing more people to buy its base subscription service at $8 a month — for a total of $17 a month. (Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly reported Showtime’s price via Apple, Sony and Roku).

36
IGN on Twitter

Daddy's Home trailer pits Will Ferrell against Mark Wahlberg http://go.ign.com/QOOWAhp  pic.twitter.com/URP9JhuqDm

37
Dancing Raccoons, Fail Videos, And Billy Joel: Why Radio Stations Lust For Facebook Memes

In recent years, Facebook’s News Feed created an enormous opportunity for the publishing business. Facebook, the place where people went to see what their friends were up to, became a central destination. News Feed collected and spread links and comments and videos, creating a virtuous cycle of attention—to organizations posting from the outside, its growth and ability to drive attention suggested endless demand. This culminated in something like industry dominance; news organizations and entertainment sites and video producers, some more intentionally than others, found that, even on the internet, the best way to reach the most people was still through a platform that isn’t their own. For Facebook, publishers filled a void in the service, supplying near-endless matter for conversation, reference and consumption within the feed; for publishers, Facebook provided growth. Facebook as a video host, or as a host for articles, strains the definition of partnership. How can you partner with the company that provides the entire context for your existence? This arrangement likewise strains the definition of a publication, which—having lost some degree of self-determination—is reduced to the sum of its content.

38
Google's new health watch will keep tabs on patients' vitals

This device could be a boon to medical research as it allows doctors to continually gather important data on their patients in real life conditions. "Historically, doctors do everything -- patients just need to turn up at the trial site," Kara Dennis, managing director of mobile health at Medidata, told Bloomberg . "Now, we're asking patients to take on meaningful responsibility in gathering information." Google plans to partner with academic institutions to ensure the device's accuracy before seeking regulatory approval in both the US and Europe later this summer.

39
The biggest obstacle to a great career is your comfort zone

What do you consider the biggest barrier to a successful career? Is it the absence of qualifications or lack of experience? Difficulty with performing well during job interviews or making good first impressions? In my experience, the biggest barrier was a lack of insight. Not being aware of the opportunities that were available to me. Not because they were hard to find, but rather hard to apply to.

40
Buick and GMC vehicles will support Android Auto and CarPlay

If you prefer to drive big honking Buick sedans and GMC trucks, you won't have to give up a phone-savvy infotainment system for the privilege. Both Apple's CarPlay and Google's Android Auto are coming to the Buick and GMC lineups, starting with the 2016 model year. CarPlay will arrive first, beginning with Buick's LaCrosse and Regal as well as GMC's Canyon, Sierra and Yukon. The Android option will show up some time later in the model year. Between this and similar moves from Cadillac and Chevy , you won't have to be fussy about your choice of cars or smartphones -- so long as you like GM's brands in the first place, you'll be taken care of.

41
Mashable on Twitter

New 'Wet Hot American Summer' trailer drips in VHS nostalgia. Watch: http://on.mash.to/1N5Nuph  pic.twitter.com/tL2XoFrMdz

42
How to make magic transforming Twitter images

You might assume that it’s actually two images – and Twitter does support attaching multiple pictures to tweets – but it’s not. Instead, the ‘magic’ message takes advantage of a quirk on the social network: Support for transparency in PNG images .

43
Amazon’s Mechanical Turk Fee Hike Irks Researchers

Kristy Milland, a psychology student at Ryerson University in Toronto, said she’ll likely have to pare her spending on Mechanical Turk after the price changes are implemented. Milland spends about $1,500 per month on Mechanical Turk polling users in an effort to study the demographics and motivations of people who use the service.

44
BlackBerry shares climb as revenue slide slows

Chen said he is committed to having a hardware business for now and said he'd like to see BlackBerry's device revenue expand again. He refused to confirm a Reuters report that the company will develop an Android device, but he said: "If I can secure Android, I will make an Android phone. If I can't, then I won't."

45
Spanish On-Demand Cleaning Startup Wayook Quietly Picks Up Backing From Axon Partners Group

Wayook , the Spanish on-demand cleaning startup, has quietly raised its first funding round: a modest €640,000 from Axon Partners Group. The investment closed a few weeks back but went mostly under the radar, which is synonymous of Wayook as a whole.

46
The future of UX design

User experience design is often thought of as a new or emerging concept in Web design and app design. However, it has been around long before it was ever given the name “user experience.”

47
Soon for Hulu, it's Showtime. For you, it's a discount - CNET

The partnership between Hulu and Showtime is the latest in a trend of traditional TV companies choosing to launch direct-to-consumer online channels. After years of resistance, companies such as HBO, CBS, Nickelodeon and Dish are offering services that stream their live programming online. Though the new options could undermine their main business of reaching viewers via a pricey package from cable companies and other providers, the programmers are loosening the reins as they grow anxious that today's young consumers won't sign up for in big, expensive TV contracts when they become the heads of their own households.

48
Epson's smart glasses are for tech-loving mechanics

For the mall-pounding public, smart glasses are a hard sell. The combo of dorky looks and, well, lack of actual need has strangled the few attempts to commercialize them. Epson (of printer fame) thinks trade and industry is where the market/money is, and is adding another smart headset to its professional-friendly range. The Moverio Pro BT-2000 (yah, really) is based on Epson's existing BT-200 model, with a more rugged design and a juicier specification. This time around, Epson is tempting engineers with a 5-megapixel stereo/3D camera with depth sensing, head tracking and support for augmented reality, like if Dickies made HoloLens. Factories and workplaces of the near future, at least those with the BT- 2000 , would have engineers sharing what they are doing, beaming images directly to other headsets for remote viewing -- be it for training or remote support (thanks to WiFi and Bluetooth conenctivity). Or, working on a tricky motor, with the schematics or next step right there in your peripheral vision. The Android-based software also adds scope for custom applications, plus there's support for voice control.

49
Instagram's latest update puts Twitter on notice

But Instagram has a clear target in mind with the update. Seemingly taking a jab at the more text-heavy Twitter, Instagram added on its blog: "Rich visual content captures everyone's unique take - not just what the community is talking about, but also what they're doing and seeing."

50
ZDNet on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

51 The Next Web on Twitter
52 Google's Sidewalk Labs takes over plans to line NYC streets with free Wi-Fi hubs
53 http://www.amazon.com/
54 5 ways to kill your dreams
55 TechCrunch
56 Classics for the people – why we should all learn from the ancient Greeks
57 Learn to read Chinese ... with ease!
58 The 10 Most-Pirated Movies
59 Never, ever give up
60 A kinder, gentler philosophy of success
61 For parents, happiness is a very high bar
62 A kinder, gentler philosophy of success
63 PewResearch Internet on Twitter
64 Lifehacker on Twitter
65 How to live to be 100+
66 Kids need structure
67 Surplus food for the homeless is just an app away - CNET
68 A ghost heart?
69 With A Fresh $15 Million, Olapic Will Replace Brands’ Stock Photos With Your Instagram Pics
70 100 Best Instagram Accounts
71 Growing new organs
72 7 TED Talks on the complexity of memory
73 How Mars might hold the secret to the origin of life
74 School Scrambles To Preserve Newly Discovered Chalkboards From 1917
75 A 17-year-old invented an ingenious way to instantly stop bleeding
76 Geomagnetic Storm Slams Earth Causing Radio Signal Blackouts and Possible Auroras
77 Google Gives Gmail Users the Ability to ‘Undo Send’
78 Reg Saddler on Twitter
79 Post-Quantum Encryption No Longer A Laughing Matter
80 Your State's Most Popular Unique Google Search Is Super-Embarrassing
81 Yotpo Raises An Additional $15M, Adds Former GoDaddy CEO To Board
82 More evidence suggests Earth is entering a sixth extinction-level event | ExtremeTech
83 Mom Wants Uber to Pay After Driver Sexually Assaulted Her Daughter
84 "Second Cousins," "Once Removed", and More Explained in Chart Form
85 A World Without Work
86 Jelli Raises $21M From Intel, iHeartMedia, UMG And More For Its “AdWords For Audio” Platform
87 Why Young, Slim, Vegetarian, Non-Smoking Indians Are Struggling With Coronary Artery Disease, Heart Attacks, and Diabetes - DNA (Beta)
88 The American civil war then and now – interactive
89 Task Manager Todoist Releases Completely Revamped Android App
90 API-Based Money Mover Currency Cloud Taps Sapphire Ventures And Rakuten For $18M
91 A London Tube map that's far more useful than the 'official' one
92 U.K. Spy Oversight Court Rules GCHQ Acted Unlawfully Again