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Netflix is bringing Dolby Atmos surround sound to its original content starting with Okja

Video streaming services have become the site for mini-platform wars unto themselves, with different services rolling out 4K, high-dynamic range video, and other improvements as they jockey for...

Sorry dog, playing on top of a bale of hay will never end well

Dog fails are the cutest fails.

This map from Zocdoc shows which health benefits people search for most in different states

As you may have heard from every single TV, radio, and web outlet, Congress is fiddling with the Affordable Care Act, ho

Meet the hologram-making, Singularity University alum who wants to reimagine theater

Theater geeks like me tend to recoil in horror when we hear about stage initiatives that incorporate a lot of technology

Amazing tropical resort in 'Minecraft' makes us wish we were digital cube people

The perfect vacation spot made of cubes.

Poor Porsche completely spins out trying to keep up with a Tesla

"OHHHH!!!"

Neill Blomkamp on his next short film, Firebase, and life in a virtual simulation

The District 9 director on the model for his new studio: ‘The focus right now is on giving all of this away for free’

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Top News
1
Google must yank search results globally, says Canada's top court

In a case involving pirated goods, the country's top court says removing results only on Google's Canada site isn't enough. But critics worry about free speech.

2
Petya ransomware: Where it comes from and how to protect yourself - TechRepublic

Once the ransomware infects a machine, it then attempts to spread itself to other PCs on the network. To propagate itself, it will try to steal credentials to gain local admin privileges, attempt to use file-shares to transfer the malicious file between PCs, and then remotely execute the file. The ransomware encrypts entire hard drives and demands a Bitcoin payment of $300 to release them.

3
The revolution in your pocket: How the iPhone changed everything - TechRepublic

Even if you would never be caught dead using an Apple product, it's clear that 10 years after the iPhone (and nine years after the App Store), it set off a revolution that has given us power and connectivity that we never had before. It turns out that the entire personal-computer era, the one that I grew up in and that appeared to be on its way to change the world, was just a prelude. We live in year 10 of the smartphone era. Long may it reign.

4
Tinder's new 'Gold' subscription shows your likes before you swipe

Gold members should see the "Likes You" feature from the top of the match list. From there you can access the "Likes You" grid and start auto-matching, dismissing, or clicking into each person's profile. When swiping in general, Gold members will be able to identify their likes thanks to the presence of a gold heart next to the person's name. The rapid-fire function is tailor-made to suit our hyperactive browsing habits.

5
4 ways that AI is enabling today's IoT revolution

While it’s early days, there are still many examples of companies already using AI & IoT to change their operations. Uber started leveraging AI to match drivers and passengers but has continuously evolved its technology to better recognize consumer behaviors and prepare for the autonomous driving era. Siemens, meanwhile, used AI & IoT to automate production lines, giving them the capability to run unsupervised for weeks, self-organizing to improve a process.

6
How to Create Instagram Stories : Social Media Examiner

How can you use these analytics? Let’s say that you have one particular photo or video that is getting a lot of views. You may want to share that to your profile and use it to encourage more people to view your story. Or, if you notice a significant drop-off of views at a particular part of your story, you might want to delete that photo or video to see if people will continue viewing past that point once you’ve removed that particular photo or video.

7
New under-display fingerprint sensor is slow but promising

Now that edge-to-edge displays are commonplace on smartphones, the new holy grail for mobile engineering is the creation of the under-display fingerprint sensor. Not under glass — that's easy — but under the thickness of the glass plus display, something nobody has quite mastered on a production scale yet.

8
Forbes PR on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

9
Leaked Facebook Rules Reveal Why It Won't Protect Black Children From Hate Speech

On Wednesday, ProPublica published dozens of startling training documents reportedly used by Facebook to train moderators on hate speech. As the trove of slides and quizzes reveals, Facebook uses a warped, one-sided reasoning to balance policing hate speech against users’ freedom of expression on the platform. This is perhaps best summarized by the above image from one of its training slideshows, wherein Facebook instructs moderators to protect “White Men,” but not “Female Drivers” or “Black Children.”

10
Why suggesting that Microsoft buy Docker is crazy talk - TechRepublic

Not everyone agrees that Microsoft should buy Docker, and for good reason. Here's why Mark Balch of container appliance manufacturer Diamanti thinks that's a bad idea.

11
Canon's full-frame 6D Mark II is a solid upgrade with a catch

Nearly four years after it first launched its original EOS 6D budget full-frame camera, Canon has unveiled a successor. The EOS 6D Mark II improves on the past model in nearly every way, offering more connection options, resolution, much faster autofocus and higher sensitivity, while retaining the light weight and good handling we liked about the original. It falls down in a key area, however, offering just 1080p video resolution rather than the 4K you'd expect in a modern DSLR.

12
Windows 10 adds end-to-end security to the Fall Creators Update - TechRepublic

The new features were announced in a blog post from Rob Lefferts, partner director of the Windows & Devices Group, Security & Enterprise, published Tuesday. "Our goal is to ensure customer safety as the security threat landscape continues to grow increasingly more sophisticated and adversaries are more successful at impacting the bottom line," Lefferts wrote in the post. "New security features in the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update allows us to be more front footed and make life harder for the bad guys."

13
The new global ransomware attack shows how many people still don't install software updates

The companies putting out the updates don’t always help much, either. Of the 18 updates Microsoft released on March 14, including the Petya/WannaCry fix, half were rated “critical,” and the rest were labeled “important.” That leaves users with little information they could use to prioritize their own updates. If, for example, it was clear that skipping a particular update would leave users vulnerable to a dangerous ransomware attack, people might agree to interrupt their work to protect themselves.

14
Fileless malware: The smart person's guide - TechRepublic

Fileless malware uses system files and functions native to the operating systems to evade detection and deliver its payload. Learn more about this invisible threat and the best approach to combat it.

15
Most IoT devices are an attack waiting to happen, unless manufacturers update their kernels - TechRepublic

Let's say that an IoT device does ship with an updated version of the embedded Linux kernel. Although upon first release, that kernel may be secure, given the rate at which malware attacks are rising, it will very shortly be vulnerable. When was the last time your IoT device updated its firmware? The only IoT device I own that regularly (and automatically) updates is Amazon Echo. The frequency of the updates has yet to be determined, but I've noticed a few instances when weekly updates were applied. These updates apply new features as well as patch security vulnerabilities. Amazon gets it. Another (un)stellar example of this is my current modem. The installed firmware on this particular device was released in September, 2016 and has yet to be updated. A number of vulnerabilities have been discovered since 9/2016. This is not acceptable. Most IoT devices do not update with nearly the regularity as does Echo. What's really surprising (to me) about this is that the devices do not alert the user they have been updated.

16
Incredible New Observation Shows Supermassive Black Holes Orbiting Each Other

You think our galaxy is special? Ha. Our boring pinwheel of gas and dark matter might be a nice hangout for humans. But 750 or so million light years away, there’s an elliptical galaxy, Galaxy 0402+379, whose two supermassive black holes are orbiting each other from a distance of only 24 or so light years. Their combined mass is around 15 billion times that of our Sun.

17
Like the Concorde, but with cheaper fares

As detailed last week at the 2017 Paris Air Show, the Boom Passenger Airliner would accommodate 45-55 passengers (half that of the Concorde) at a maximum speed of Mach 2.2. Flying that fast, it would cut the current flight time between London and New York in half to just 3 hours, 15 minutes and a reduce a typical 14-hour flight between Los Angeles and Sydney to 6 hours, 45 minutes. Though the Concorde flew slightly slower at Mach 2.02, its usual flight time between London and New York was only 15 minutes longer.

18
Report: 37% of adults at 'serious risk' of being hacked through their IoT devices - TechRepublic

Some 37% of UK adults said they did not know how to protect their smart devices from being hacked, the report found. One in three adults said they were not aware of the possible security risks their smart gadgets open up, such as criminals hacking into door locks, baby monitors, and other connected devices. The same number also said they don't think smart device manufacturers provide adequate education to consumers about the dangers of non-secure Internet of Things (IoT) devices.

19
'Rick and Morty' update brings Mr. Poopybutthole to 'Rocket League'

The anniversary update, coming July 5, will include a handful of Rick and Morty items that will drop as common-level items after online matches. There are Rick Sanchez and Morty Smith antennas, car toppers featuring a Mr. Meeseeks, a Cromulon, and Mr. Poopybutthole, a cartoony rocket boost trail, and portal wheels.

20
http://engt.co/2tk12NS

21
Scientists Push Back Against Controversial Paper Claiming a Limit To Human Lifespans

So Brown’s team, as well as four other teams, re-analyzed the Nature paper and found lots of problems. Brown’s own analysis found that the existence of the plateau at 115 years depends on the age and death date of the oldest person ever, France’s Jeanne Louise Calment, who lived to be 122. Others mentioned the increase in the number of people living past 100 will make it more likely to see more folks live past 115, or even 122. Still others found problems with the statistics and methods used to analyze such small sample sizes or argued that we don’t have enough data to be sure. One paper noted that breaking the data up into individual years that people died in is arbitrary, since years are an arbitrary division of time. Maybe the presence of a 25-year plateau is itself a statistical fluctuation.

22
Telegram app agrees to register in Russia, but not to share private data

MOSCOW Pavel Durov, founder of the Telegram messaging app, agreed on Wednesday for his firm to be registered in Russia after coming under pressure from the authorities to do so, but said it would not share confidential user data with anyone.

23
Volvo, Autoliv And Nvidia Aim For Self-Driving Car Debut By 2021

Volvo and Autoliv will form a new partnership, called Zenunity, which aims to develop self-driving car software based on Nvidia’s Drive PX computing platform.

24
Facebook Now Has 2 Billion Users

Tom is PCMag's San Francisco-based news reporter. He got his start in technology journalism by reviewing the latest hard drives, keyboards, and much more for PCMag's sister site, Computer Shopper. As a freelancer, he's written on topics as diverse as Borneo's rain forests, Middle Eastern airlines, and big data's role in presidential elections. A graduate of Middlebury College, Tom also has a master's journalism degree from New York University. Follow him on Twitter @branttom. More »

25
Uber says it never told self-driving car executive to take Google's files

Uber said it never told a self-driving car executive to download files from his former employer, Alphabet Inc's Waymo unit, according to a court filing in a contentious trade secret lawsuit.

26
NASA finds signs of ancient 'Niagara Falls' of lava on Mars

Sure, NASA has found signs of ancient water on Mars multiple times over the years, but now it's time to talk about something that's significantly more badass: molten Martian lava.

27
Petya virus is something worse than ransomware, new analysis shows

So then why purport to be ransomware? There’s no way to say for certain right now, but Suiche believes it was about hiding who was really behind the attack. “We believe the ransomware was in fact a lure to control the media narrative,” he writes, saying that ransomware suggests “some mysterious hacker group” being behind the virus “rather than a national state.”

28
Ocadao supermarket trials driverless van deliveries - BBC News

Internet-based grocer Ocado teams up with a robotics firm to test driverless deliveries in London.

29
https://news.slashdot.org/story/17/06/28/2028211/samsung-plans-to-open-380-million-home-appliance-plant-in-us-creating-almost-1000-jobs?utm_source=slashdot&utm_medium=twitter

The South Korean firm said this year it was in talks to build a home appliances plant in the United States amid worries about protectionist policies under U.S. President Donald Trump put pressure on global companies to generate jobs in the country. "With this investment, Samsung is reaffirming its commitment to expanding its U.S. operations and deepening our connection to the American consumers, engineers and innovators," Samsung Electronics America President and CEO Tim Baxter said.

30
US imposes stricter security screenings at foreign airports, but won’t expand laptop ban yet

John Kelly, the US secretary of Homeland Security, announced today that the new measures were being put in place. Though he didn’t go into specifics, Kelly said the new requirements would include further screenings of electronics, more thorough vetting of passengers, and measures meant to stop “insider attacks.”

31
From Ukraine with ransomware: How the global mess all began

Now researchers believe they found where the first spark went off. The attacks started in Kiev, Ukraine, during the early hours of Tuesday. While the majority of victims were in Ukraine and neighboring Russia, it spread throughout the world, hitting global companies like Maersk, FedEx and Merck.

32
Steve Jobs’s Mock Turtleneck Gets a Second Life

33
Lifehacker on Twitter

This web app maps out North America's indigenous history: http://lifehac.kr/Rjl0NqA  pic.twitter.com/fxXRuonTtR

34
Remote code execution flaws exposed in Kaspersky Server software | ZDNet

"Kaspersky Lab would like to thank researchers from Core Security Technologies for pointing out vulnerabilities in Web Console of Kaspersky Anti-Virus for Linux File Server 8, which allowed, under specific conditions, unauthorized access to some product functionality. These vulnerabilities are now fixed. Kaspersky Lab recommends to all customers, using Web Console, to upgrade the Kaspersky Anti-Virus for Linux File Server 8 to new CF4 version."

35
10 Games Every Nintendo Wii U Player Needs

$59.99 The premiere game for the Wii U could be the best 3D Mario game since Super Mario 64. Yes, better than Super Mario Galaxy. A big reason why is because Mario in HD looks fantastic. Mario's whimsical, colorful visuals were born for high-def. The orchestrated music will make you wish all Mario games sound this way. The controls feel perfect. Each level is filled with new ideas to toy with like a stage where platforms vanish and reappear to the rhythm of the music. It's also a fantastic multiplayer game. You will argue, yell, and finally agree to work together to find every single last star, stamp, and secret (find all the hidden Luigis!) until you've conquered the game and either replay it all over again or await the inevitable sequel (we hope). A must-have for any Wii U owner.

36
Alan Moore's Weird Noir Anthology Series Show Pieces Is Coming to Shudder

Alan Moore has had many works adapted into films—including Watchmen , From Hell , and V for Vendetta —but noir thriller Show Pieces , first released in 2012, is the first time the acclaimed author wrote specifically for the screen. The five-part series hits horror streaming network Shudder tomorrow.

37
Lin Manuel-Miranda's new charity challenge has inspired celebrities to sing some 'Hamilton' hits

@ayeshacurry and I are collaborating with Lin-Manuel Miranda to raise money for a coalition of immigration organizations.  We all feel strongly about supporting these important organizations fighting to protect immigrants, refugees, and asylum seekers who want to make a better life for themselves and their families. The grand prize winner will join us and Lin-Manuel at the LA opening on August 16th. We think that this will be the biggest Hamilton sweepstakes yet, but we need your help… Head over to prizeo.com/Hamilton for more details.  #ham4all  #thatgirlgood

38
Honda adds Apple CarPlay to some 2018 Fit configurations

Honda on Wednesday filled in an important gap in its support for Apple CarPlay, finally announcing compatibility for the Fit hatchback line via 2018 models, which launch in July. Both CarPlay and Android Auto will be availble on Sport, EX, and EX-L trims of the car, Honda said. On all three, drivers will connect through a 7-inch touchscreen. The company has yet to reveal pricing, but EX versions of the 2017 Fit start at $18,000, nearly $2,000 more than the base LX configuration. All 2018 trims will also gain access to Honda's Sensing driver assist technologies, such as collision and lane departure features —they will only come standard on EX and EX-L packages, however. The Fit is an important addition as one of Honda's most affordable products. A common complaint with CarPlay is that the technology is often reserved for mid- to high-end vehicles, and even then it may not always be a standard technology. There are a growing number of exceptions though, from automakers such as Ford , Kia, and Chevrolet. Honda itself offers CarPlay on the Accord and Civic, two of the most popular cars in the U.

39
Ethereum Could Be Using More Than a Country's Worth of Electricity

Still, the methodology behind de Vries index isn’t totally exact, and since blockchain is decentralized, it would be next to impossible to truly ascertain just how much electricity these home-based Ether mining operations are consuming. The estimates do indicate, however, just how energy-intensive cryptocurrency mining has the potential to be. One major reason for this is the power-hungry graphics cards involved. It’s ironic that mining cryptocurrencies in order to maintain blockchains — which are perhaps the most efficient and secure information ledgers we have — is a process that’s not particularly efficient.

40
Uber Denies It Knew About Copied Data in Waymo Secrets Suit

Uber told U.S. District Judge William Alsup in Wednesday’s filing that it searched its own servers in vain for Waymo’s files and noted that it has allowed Waymo to conduct 55 hours of inspections of its computers, facilities and emails. Alsup said in a May 11 ruling that Waymo made a “compelling” showing that Levandowski absconded with its files and that Uber “knew or should have known" the engineer took the information when it brought him aboard.

41
Eerily Accurate Facial Reconstructions Are Allowing the Dead to Speak

Researchers at Liverpool John Moore’s University have reconstructed the face of a man who lived in Dublin some 500 years ago. Incredibly accurate reconstructions like this are providing archaeologists with new way of studying the past—while also allowing them to visualize some of the most forgotten figures in history.

42
Google Photos' AI-powered sharing is now available

Neither feature is flawless. What if your significant other has their back turned to the camera in an otherwise important shot? And while your friends won't need Google Photos to receive suggested shares, the shared library clearly depends on everyone signing up. Still, this might be one of the more practical examples of how AI technology can help in everyday life. You won't always have to remember to share photos when you get home -- a machine will do much of the work for you.

43
Earthling police officer pulls over an alien riding shotgun in a real WTF moment

According to WSB-TV, the alien is a fake stuffed doll and police say the driver, who was issued a verbal warning, "did not mention as to why he had an out of this world passenger."

44
Dad's genius pool nap hack has the internet screaming

According to Skyler, her father "bought a snorkel for the sole purpose of taking naps in the pool." She snapped a few photos of her dad, face down in the pool, with a snorkel in his mouth, floating on a pool noodle.

45
The biggest Windows 10 shop? Microsoft partner Accenture | ZDNet

Accenture is on track to have all of its 400,000 employees on Windows 10 by 2018, officials say, which will culminate a two-year corporate migration.

46
I Tried Using Food as Makeup and It Went Poorly

I didn’t make a whole palette like Yeah does in her video, but instead focused on a single color: a nice, whorish lime green. I soaked some green apple Skittles—thank Dog lime is coming back—in a bit of water until all of their glorious coloring was depleted, then mixed that sugary water with some rice flour to make my shadow. It was pretty enough but, when I tried to rub it on my eyes, it just rolled up into little crumbs and fell from my lids onto the rest of my face.

47
iOS 11 on an iPad Pro still won’t replace your laptop

If you have a hovering app open on top of other apps, the interactions with that app are messy, even for a beta. There’s a little handle at the top which hints you can swipe down on it, but if you miss the tap target then the Notification Center (that now looks like a lock screen) activates. Likewise, closing the app from this view is extremely frustrating. You’d expect you could swipe down on the app to dismiss it, but that swipe down action will actually snap it into a side-by-side view or replace whatever other app you had snapped. To dismiss a floating app you actually have to swipe on the very left edge of the app and push it towards the right-hand side of the screen for it to disappear. To get it back, you then swipe from the right-hand edge of the screen. If that sounds confusing, it’s because it simply is. Swiping from the right-hand edge of the screen normally without any apps floating does nothing, so Apple has re-purposed an edge swipe gesture for a super specific reason.

48
A man's bold, unadvised tattoo proposal thankfully went very right

A man's bold, unadvised tattoo proposal thankfully went very right

49
Revamped Twitch app streams live from your phone

As useful as the Twitch mobile app can be, it still falls short of what you're used to on the desktop, especially if you're a broadcaster. Would you believe that you have to switch apps just to stream live? Thankfully, it's shrinking that gap today. It's starting to roll out a Twitch app overhaul that adds some of the features you take for granted while refining the interface. For creators, the biggest deal is simply direct mobile streaming -- you can livestream to your channel without any go-between software. While phone-based broadcasting was certainly possible before, this could easily lead to more IRL streams from your favorite streamers.

50
Macau's ATMs Are Using Facial Recognition to Help Follow the Money

Chinese bettors withdrawing money from some ATMs in Macau need to do more than punch in their PIN code. They also have to stare into a camera for six seconds so facial-recognition software can verify their identity and help monitor transactions.

51 The most important question to ask a potential IoT development partner
52 TNW on Twitter
53 Legislation is needed for smart cities, say 90% of US companies - TechRepublic
54 Four Times You Might Actually Want To Put Up With A Crappy Boss
55 Tencent Rules China. The Problem Is the Rest of the World
56 Petya ransomware: everything we know about the massive cyber attack
57 Elon Musk's boring machine completes the first section of an LA tunnel
58 CNET News on Twitter
59 China Is About to Bury Elon Musk in Batteries
60 When IoT met AI: The Intelligence of Things
61 ChargePoint takes over GE’s 9,800 electric vehicle charging spots
62 Ditto doll is looking damn good in its new purple wig
63 Google unveils Advr, an experimental Area 120 project for advertising in VR
64 10 years of iPhone innovation: The top features Apple launched with each new iPhone - TechRepublic
65 iZombie's Season Finale Obliterated the Status Quo and Made Next Season a Must-Watch
66 Petya ransomware attack: What it is, and why this is happening again | ZDNet
67 Kentucky Wildlife Officials Assure Citizens That Alleged Lake Shark Threat Isn’t Real
68 Nasdaq’s Trekkie CEO Wants To Modernize Wall Street With Blockchain, VR, And Anything Else That Sticks
69 Turns Out New Petya is Not a Ransomware, It’s a Destructive Wiper Malware
70 The Best Tablets of 2017
71 Leaked Manual Reveals How CIA Can Track Windows Users by Gauging Wi-Fi Signal
72 Kansas City Royals catcher knocked down by a collegiate killer softball pitch
73 Google News gets facelift that focuses on showing facts
74 A commercial astronaut training site and its massive pool are coming to Britain
75 6 Things the US Government Is Doing That Supervillains Have Also Done
76 Your Yearly Facebook Usage Has A Lower Carbon Footprint Than A Latte
77 Amazon Starts Charm Offensive as Merchants Defect to Wal-Mart
78 How Spider-Man: Homecoming Balanced Peter Parker's Legacy and Tony Stark's Influence
79 The Country’s Mayors Commit Their Cities To 100% Renewable Power
80 US replaces airplane laptop ban with tighter security
81 The Latest Hack May Be About Disruption, Not Money
82 The Most Important Thing in the Universe to Star-Lord Was Almost a Darth Vader Figure
83 6 Red Flags That Make Recruiters Pass On Your Resume
84 Petya ransomware attack: How many victims are there really? | ZDNet
85 We review CNET's original iPhone review
86 We’re Tracking Every Project Elon Musk Has Dreamed Up.
87 Everything you need to know about Safari 11 | Cult of Mac
88 Why 2017 Is The Year Of Reckoning For The Streaming Music Business
89 FedEx Says Cyberattack Disrupts TNT's Worldwide Operations
90 Assuming that women journalists don't tweet strong opinions is 'complete bollocks'
91 LG’s new 77-inch OLED wallpaper TV is now available for the price of a new car
92 TNW on Twitter
93 Former Employee Sues Binary for Post-Resignation Harassment