Top News
1
Forget the Shortest Route Across a City; New Algorithm Finds the Most Beautiful | MIT Technology Review

That could change now thanks to the work of Daniele Quercia at Yahoo Labs in Barcelona, Spain, and a couple of pals. These guys have worked out how to measure the “beauty” of specific locations within cities and then designed an algorithm that automatically chooses a route between two locations in a way that maximizes the beauty along it. “The goal of this work is to automatically suggest routes that are not only short but also emotionally pleasant,” they say.

2
The Beginner's Guide to Skype

On the Facebook News Feed in Skype, you can hover your mouse over your friend’s update, which will show if she is available for phone or video calling. If your friend's mobile or landline number shows, you can call her using Skype credit or a subscription (see below). If your Facebook friend also has Skype, you can call her for free by tapping "Call Skype." If no options appear, this means your friend has not registered her phone number on her Facebook profile, and that she is not your Skype contact.

3
Heat Index: Find the Right Dating Site or App for You

With Spira's help, we narrowed down which sites and apps users should check out. We created a scale, from most likely to land you a relationship, to least likely. If you want to get married, casually date or simply hook up, take a look below.

4
Nathan Heller: The Tech Industry vs. San Francisco

Many people in San Francisco today worry that the tech industry is behaving like Coyote, professing to nurture and provide while actually hoarding. San Francisco has a real-estate shortage. Some speculators, looking to capitalize on growing demand, have started circumventing rent control using buyouts: lumps of cash given if long-term tenants leave. Others have invoked a 1986 California law known as the Ellis Act, which permits evictions when landlords want to go out of business permanently. By repeatedly going “out of business” and exploiting a loophole in the local condo laws, speculators have been able to transform rent-controlled buildings into market-value homes. From 1990 to 1997, there were twenty-eight Ellis Act petitions in San Francisco. From 2006 to 2013, there were three hundred and seventy-four. (A California Senate bill that would curb Ellis Act abuses had been heavily championed by the San Francisco mayor and a few tech firms, but it was abandoned in Sacramento by its chief legislative advocate last week.) San Francisco today has the second-highest median income in the United States, but, even using that peg, middle-income San Franciscans can afford less than a sixth of the homes available in town.

5
The Top 10 Reasons You're Still Clinging to Facebook

For some, Facebook serves as a news and gossip aggregate. It may also be the only online social environment that consists of people you actually know. You can find out what matters to them, which can be more interesting and important to you than what some people (who you often don’t know personally) post on Twitter .

6
Emmy Nominations: What You Can Expect Today

But there's really no need to give much thought to the bleak possibility of their omission. When Mindy Kaling and Carson Daly reveal the nominees for the 66th Primetime Emmy Awards live from Hollywood, all indications are you'll hear those familiar names and others in major categories. Joining the aforementioned trio in the League of probable nominees are the likes of Game of Thrones , Mad Men , Louie — you know, the usual.

7
Microsoft warns support ending for popular Windows products - CNET

Complete end of support for Windows Server 2003 is approaching next year, as well. On July 14, Microsoft's extended support period for that product cuts off, which means the company won't be issuing patches, updates or fixes of any kind for that operating system (unless users have pricey Custom Support Agreements in place). A number of small businesses are still running Windows Server 2003. Microsoft officials are hoping to convince them to move to Windows Server 2012 R2 and/or Azure.

8
A Brain-Computer Interface for Speech | MIT Technology Review

At UCSF, Chang has been carrying out speech experiments in connection with brain surgeries he performs on patients with epilepsy. A sheet of electrodes placed under the patients’ skulls records electrical activity from the surface of the brain. Patients wear the device, known as an electrocorticography array, for several days so that doctors can locate the exact source of seizures.

9
Smartphone App Revenue Dominated By A Handful Of Games And Developers

Smartphone watchers are happy to describe the current third-party developer ecosystem as ‘an app world’, but new research suggests that it is ‘a gaming world’ instead, and you’re going to need large pockets if you are going to attempt to take on the big names.

10
Girl Geek Academy wants to teach one million girls to code - CNET

After running these workshops and discovering just how many women were interested in learning these skills, Butow and her associates decided to widen their scope -- opening up a series of classes and programs for women of all ages (above the age of 18) and skill levels with a target of helping one million build apps and learn to create startups by the year 2025.

11
Washington, D.C. Uber User "Held Against Will in High Speed Chase"

When poor old Ryan Simonetti booked a ride on Uber on Tuesday, he was hoping for a quiet journey from the Verizon Center to his company's new offices in Tysons Corner. But instead, he got rather more than he bargained for.

12
US farmer drops iPhone in grain bin, gets it back from Japan - CNET

Sometimes, minor phone-related miracles do occur. That iPhone is now back in Whitney's possession, many months later, after traveling across the world in a grain shipment. The iPhone was moved along by truck, barge, and ship on its journey. A worker at a grain facility in Japan found it, sleuthed out the owner, and mailed it back to Whitney.

13
How The EU Censors Google & Search Engines Just Like China

But as Europe is now discovering, having a court grant this new right without some better guidelines on exactly how it should be used, or not used, is fraught with issues — among them, enabling the effective censorship of the press. That’s because even if the law removes content only from a search engine like Google, but not from a media outlet itself, the inability for people to easily find the content is de facto censorship.

14 Why Have Small Tech Company IPOs Disappeared?

I am the Cordell Professor of Finance at the University of Florida’s Warrington College of Business Administration. I have been writing on initial public offerings (IPOs) for over 30 years and I speak publicly at IPO forums and seminars world-wide. I have been quoted hundreds of times in the Financial Times, New York Times, USA Today, Wall Street Journal, and Washington Post, and I appear occasionally on Bloomberg TV/Radio, CNBC, and Fox Business. Google Scholar records over 25,000 citations to my work. I do some consulting and have been a mutual fund trustee, and I am president-elect of the Financial Management Association. In my personal investing, over time I have beaten the market, mainly through successful market timing rather than picking individual securities that have outperformed.

15
Transformer jet is like the Optimus Prime of planes - CNET

As far as onboard technology goes, BAE gave us a look at 3D-printing technology that can use data from engineers to print out UAVs deployed from the aircraft to survey dangerous situations. And it showed how such aircraft might one day be equipped with a concentrated laser beam to destroy enemy missiles.

16
Researcher: I Was Suspended For Finding Flaws In FireEye Security Kit

Bourbon told me he was contacted by FireEye and asked to remove the posts. Emails seen by your reporter appear to back up that claim and indicated the security firm reached out to Bourbon’s employer, Sogeti, an IT consultancy, to let it know what was going on. They also indicated FireEye was told by the researcher about the vulnerabilities back in May, but hadn’t given him any notice of patches for the flaws. Bourbon believes FireEye may have had a part in proceedings by complaining to his managers, which the security firm has denied . He was also irritated by the contact made with Sogeti in the first place, as he claimed he found the vulnerabilities in his own time, not on the company clock.

17
PayPal's Braintree Moves To Be The Cash Register For Every App

Braintree’s new tools also pave the way for it to incorporate other kids of payment into its virtual registers, including crypto currencies like Bitcoin and debit-payments to regional banks in countries like Germany. Braintree operates in 40 countries and takes 130 different currencies. It also owns peer-to-peer payments network Venmo, and says the system is automatically integrated into its merchant software.

18 How Silicon Valley Could Revolutionize Salinas Valley, America's Farming Capital

Salinas Valley, just an hour south of Silicon Valley, is the fresh food capital of America and home to agricultural giants such as Dole Foods, Chiquita, Driscoll Berries, Taylor Farms, Ocean Mist Farms, JV Smith and Tanimura & Antle, to name a few. Salinas Valley agriculture is an $8 billion business and it is here that more than 80 percent of the nation’s lettuce is produced and other top crops, including strawberries, broccoli, artichokes and wine grapes. This is a highly competitive industry that has been refined over five generations, taking out every element of cost, and now it is ripe for innovation.

19
WIRED Summer Binge-Watching Guide: Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles | Underwire | WIRED

These are the chronicles of Sarah Connor, to be sure, but John’s dynamic with Cameron is the most important element of this series. Not just because he’s mad crushing on her, either. Sarah is John’s mom and essential to his survival, i.e. essential to the survival of the future Resistance, but her humanity dooms her to being only a temporary presence in his life. Cameron, on the other hand, will be at John’s side as his forever-protector as long as there’s juice pumping through her chip, and that means his trust in her is crucial. John can sleep at night because he knows he’s got metal to protect him from metal, which is something not even a mother’s love can provide. John says it himself in a passionate defense of his guardian at one point: “She saves my life!” So, basically, the entire series hinges on this one scene, which comes in the opener of Season 2. Cameron has sustained critical systems damage after a car bombing and reverted back to her factory settings, so to speak. The new mission: Terminate John Connor. It takes both Connors and two very big trucks to neutralize the rampaging former-friendly, but once they’ve got her pinned John leaps in to pull her chip and administer the machine equivalent of the True Death .

20
How to Keep the Internet of Things From Repeating AOL’s Early Blunders | Business | WIRED

If Supalla’s idea works—and hardware makers are smart enough to open up their devices through robust APIs—Spark’s cloud service doesn’t have to be anywhere near the only option, just as the web itself lives on innumerable servers and services. The key point is to ensure that the better paradigm prevails. For the Internet of Things, as with the entire internet itself, it’s not the nodes that matter. It’s the network. “Today, there aren’t enough things on the market to worry about intercompatibility, but there will be five years from now,” Supalla says. And if we do right, he says, “all of the sudden these products stop looking like hardware and start behaving a little more like software.”

21
The Evolving Genius Of Louis Kahn

A new exhibition at the Design Museum in London is designed to expose a broader audience to Kahn's architectural genius. "We talk about Louis Kahn as someone who isn’t as heralded within the general public as he should be," curator Alex Newson says in an interview.

22
The Not So Hidden Costs Of An Internet Of Things

Assuming that a unified set of standards emerges, the fear is that it will only gain traction once these connected devices gain a toe-hold in the marketplace, with the inevitable privacy and security breaches that will surely follow. When it comes to safeguarding user data – the bits of it that are not being monetized, at least – Silicon Valley often takes a, “We must wait until the problems happen” approach. The argument, neatly summarized by Google’s Vint Cerf at an FTC workshop  last year is that this is all such uncharted territory that we can’t develop solutions until we see exactly what the nature of the problems are. But at this point, it’s clear that consumers deserve to have a reasonable assumption of privacy and security before they expose their home appliances and wearables to the Internet. The onus shouldn’t be on the user to push and pull obscure levers to maintain control over privacy. Privacy and security should be enabled by default, with consumers given a choice to opt-out of best practices rather than having to opt-in.

23
Have You Read The Latest Startup Thriller?

After selling his startup, Lucas Carlson decided to write a book. Like most self-important entrepreneurs on a mission to change the world, he wanted to write about lessons learned in startup life. But his wife, who Carlson says is a barometer for his ideas, told him that it was a “stupid idea.”

24
Samsung said it would look into new child-labor allegations at one of its supplier factories

SEOUL—Samsung Electronics Co. said Thursday it will look into new allegations about the use of child labor at one of its supplier factories in China.

25
High Quality Images of the iPhone 6's Supposed Rear Shell

Regardless, the images show a nearly all-metal design, with some, but not all, of the access ports cut out: the headphone jack and Lightning port are there, for instance, while the camera, mic and flash holes are yet to be machined. What we're looking at is a more rounded take on the current iPhone 5S. The Apple logo is cut out of the shell, too, suggesting that the iPhone may get a durable embedded logo like the iPad.

26
4 Questions To Ask When Hunting For A Startup Job--Or Any Job At That

During the interview process, ask questions that confirm the company’s values align with your own, and seek to understand the degree of corporate transparency and whether there will be frequent feedback from the management team. If not, your new startup job may fail to meet your expectations and become an environment of frustration instead of the incubator for growth you are seeking.

27
Emergency surveillance law to be brought in with cross-party support

There will be no power to look at the content of phone calls, only location, date and the phone numbers. Government sources say they have been forced to act due to European court of justice ruling in April saying the current laws invaded individual privacy. The government says if there had been no new powers there would have been no obligation on phone and internet companies to keep records if there was a UK court challenge to the retention of data.

28
Customers Infuriated Over Jeep 'Scam' With $10K Vehicles

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 34 million unique visitors worldwide and 15 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

29
Suspended Machines Exist Only To Keep Themselves From Falling Down

Grayber originally wanted to be an inventor, but found the process frustrating. As a student at Hampshire College, Grayber found an outlet for his passion for inventing in sculpture. Grayber's first autonomous objects, made of raw steel and wooden timbers, were, similarly, mechanical pieces that suspended themselves in mid-air. He designed them to work with the architecture of the school's art gallery, and recalls: "The faculty was so worried about the pieces falling on someone that they called a campus public safety meeting before they would allow my show to open."

30
Firestorm Coming to The CW's Flash - IGN

“[Executive producers] Geoff Johns, Andrew Kreisberg and myself designed the pilot and series to include Ronnie (aka Firestorm) — and to actually have someone with Robbie's talent playing the role is beyond exciting. We can't wait for viewers and fans of the character to check it out," said EP Greg Berlanti (Arrow, The Tomorrow People) in a statement.

31
DrivePop: 1 TB of Cloud Backup Accessible Everywhere - Lifetime License | Cult of Mac Deals

IS THIS CLOUD STORAGE? – Online Backup is different than a cloud storage service like Dropbox or Google Drive. With cloud storage, you can upload and save files online without saving a copy on your computer. With Online Backup, you must hold an original copy – at all times – of the file on the computer it was backed up from. If you delete files from your computer that have been backed up, DrivePop will remove the corresponding backup from their servers, but they will keep the most recent version of your deleted files for 30 days, so you’ll always be able to get your files back.

32
Google faces Motorola phone ban

Motorola faces the prospect of being forced to remove its handsets from sale in Germany and to recall phones already bought by business customers.

33
Microsoft's 'Project Spark' game creator headed for October release

Microsoft's Project Spark has already been available to early testers for the better part of four months , but gamers have been kept in the dark over when it'll finally go on general sale. Until today. The company has announced that the retail version of its game-creation title will hit Xbox One and PC in October as part of a phased worldwide rollout. It'll be available first in the Americas on October 7th, then make its way to Asia-Pacific countries on October 9th before hitting Europe on October 10th. Microsoft is pricing the Project Spark Starter Pack for Xbox One at $39.99/£29.99 and will include packs full of sounds, effects, animations, props and "advanced creator features" that will help you create a virtual world that you (and hopefully others) can be proud of. It'll also feature the first sci-fi pack Galaxies: First Contact , Champions Quest: Void Storm , special characters and the first episode of what the developers are calling an "epic campaign adventure." The good news is that there's plenty of time enjoy the open beta , check the source links below to get involved (and earn achievements in the process).

34
A Machine That Counts Calories Just By Looking At Food

GE's new calorie-counting device uses microwaves to figure out how much fat and water are in your foods--so you don't have to guess.