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PewDiePie's response to making $7.4 million is exactly why he's so successful

There are a few things commonly accepted about Felix Kjellberg, aka PewDiePie. He screams a lot. He publishes videos himself playing video games. He makes a lot of money doing so. The latest figure...

Sherlock special is coming to big and small screens 'in the next year'

Sherlock is back this year for a special extended episode — and it's coming to the big screen. Speaking at Comic-Con today, executive producer Steven Moffat said that the show's upcoming one-off...

One-of-a-kind Apollo-themed Ford Mustang headed for airshow auction - CNET

Ford has created a one-of-a-kind Mustang modeled after NASA's Saturn V Apollo rocket, to be auctioned in late July.

Watch famous movies edited down to just the lines spoken by people of color

"Every Single Word Spoken by a Person of Color in [Mainstream Film Title]" is a new Tumblr project by Welcome to Night Vale's Dylan Marron, which has so far reduced 11 mainstream films to the lines...

Revenge-seeking dog hoses owner down

An enterprising dog stole a hose to create a water-park experience for his owner.

20th Century Fox Stole Some of Marvel’s Swagger for Comic-Con

A massive collection of Marvel stars gathered at Comic-Con on Saturday, but it wasn’t for the the Marvel Studios panel—it was the 20th Century Fox one.

The Last of Us concept artist John Sweeney creates limited edition Shenmue 3 print

Shenmue 3 was was announced at this year's E3, causing minor meltdowns among those who'd been waiting 15 years for the second sequel to the Dreamcast classic. And it's not just players who are...

Diplomats: Iran nuclear agreement announcement planned Monday

Though hurdles remains, hopes are for a historic deal to be announced Monday.

Nifty New Resin Solves a Major Problem With 3-D Printing

Formlabs' new resin can be turned into cyan chains strong enough to hoist cinder blocks.

Prelude FLNG Taking Shape - Bird's-Eye-View of Largest Floating Structure Ever Built - gCaptain

Here’s the latest update from Shell on its massive Prelude FLNG (floating liquefied natural gas) facility currently under construction at Samsung Heavy Industries’ shipyard in Geoje, South Korea. At 488 meters long and 600,000 tons fully loaded, the facility will be the largest floating object ever constructed. And now as the last of the topside modules …

22 useless beauty tips that you should ignore

While some beauty tips are invaluable, there are tons of other hacks that might be harming your skin.

Everything From Today’s American Horror Story/Scream Queens Combo Panel

Ryan Murphy has managed to secure himself an entire hour at Comic Con, thanks to a panel that combined the AHS and Fox's new fall show Scream Queens.

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Top News
1
Interconnected rats' brains create organic computer

The researcher then explored the idea of a "superbrain" and experimented with a pack of rats. They worked in pairs, so when one set solved a problem, their brain activity was relayed to the other pair through electrical stimulation. On receiving the electrical clues to solve the problem, the second pair found it easier to complete the task. The interconnected group of rodents learned to recognize brain activity patterns to complete the tasks and they synchronized their activities when given a particular stimulus. In one particular test, they received electrical stimulation that was linked to an increase or decrease in the air temperature and pressure. Based on those cues, the group was able to predict the chance of rain with 41 percent accuracy. The demo concluded that the rats achieved better and faster results than they would individually.

2
White House may find more data breaches following security 'sprint'

As for preventing future disasters? That's a tougher call. Scott isn't yet saying how well each branch fared during the sprint, but he notes that "some will get there, and some won't." In other words, it's likely that numerous institutions will need to revamp their security policies, whether they're learning how to protect against hacks or limit the damage if and when someone gets in. That's not comforting if your information is stored at one of those behind-the-times institutions, but it beats finding out after a future incident.

3
Why we need to slow down our lives

Some people, if they can afford it, try to acquire a place in the country or a second home; I’ve always thought it easier to make a second house in the week — especially if, like most of us, you lack the funds for expensive real estate. These days, in the age of movement and connection, space, as Marx had it in another context, has been annihilated by time; we feel as though we can make contact with almost anywhere at any moment. But as fast as geography is coming under our control, the clock is exerting more and more tyranny over us. And the more we can contact others, the more, it sometimes seems, we lose contact with ourselves. When I left New York City for the backstreets of Japan, I figured I’d be growing poorer in terms of money, amusements, social life, and obvious prospects, but I’d be richer in what I prize most: days and hours.

4
Why we laugh

Did you know that you're 30 times more likely to laugh if you're with somebody else than if you're alone? Cognitive neuroscientist Sophie Scott shares this and other surprising facts about laughter in this fast-paced, action-packed and, yes, hilarious dash through the science of the topic.

5
2017 Bugatti Chiron: The $2.5-million, 1500-hp Son of Veyron - Feature

The 8.0-liter W-16 engine returns, though now with direct injection, increased boost pressure, and at least two of its four turbochargers electrically powered. Output rises from 1200 to 1500 horsepower, and the 1106 pound-feet torque peak arrives lower in the rev range. A seven-speed dual-clutch automatic again handles the shifting, and the four-wheel-drive system adds torque vectoring.

6
The Best Way to Cook a Steak - Bon Appetit

We love a juicy, well-cooked (though not well-done!) steak. When you’ve got a quality piece of meat, you don’t have to gussy it up with complicated cooking techniques and extravagant sauces—and that’s precisely why we love it. It’s simplicity at its best: just good, old fashioned, unfussy eatin’. So why is cooking a steak so darn difficult? From a tragically gray exterior to an overly-cooked inside, there are so many ways to go wrong.

7
A shark-deterrent wetsuit (and it's not what you think)

Hamish Jolly, an ocean swimmer in Australia, wanted a wetsuit that would deter a curious shark from mistaking him for a potential source of nourishment. (Which, statistically, is rare, but certainly a fate worth avoiding.) Working with a team of scientists, he and his friends came up with a fresh approach — not a shark cage, not a suit of chain-mail, but a sleek suit that taps our growing understanding of shark vision.

8
inTacto's 2013 FLAT DESIGN vs REALISM

Battle of FLAT vs. REALISM

9
Why do ambitious women have flat heads?

Dame Stephanie Shirley is the most successful tech entrepreneur you never heard of. In the 1960s, she founded a pioneering all-woman software company in the UK, which was ultimately valued at $3 billion, making millionaires of 70 of her team members. In this frank and often hilarious talk, she explains why she went by “Steve,” how she upended the expectations of the time, and shares some sure-fire ways to identify ambitious women …

10
These Photos Will Make You Want To Put Your Phone Down Forever

You've probably noticed something like this in your own life: You're at dinner with someone, there's a lull in the conversation, and suddenly both of you are checking your smartphones. Romero says the devices become an excuse to hide a "lost connection" between people.

11
Be an opportunity maker

We all want to use our talents to create something meaningful with our lives. But how to get started? (And ... what if you're shy?) Writer Kare Anderson shares her own story of chronic shyness, and how she opened up her world by helping other people use their own talents and passions.

12
NASA just released the 1st clear photo ever taken of Pluto and its largest moon

New Horizons' seven instruments will study Pluto in more detail than any of the five moons, including Charon. But simply from detailed images like this — and many more to come as New Horizons closes in on Pluto — scientists will still get a better understanding of Charon than they ever have before.

13
Dr Schäuble’s Plan for Europe: Do Europeans approve? - Article to appear in Die Zeit on Thursday 16th July 2015

Pre-publication summary:  Five months of intense negotiations between Greece and the Eurogroup never had a chance of success. Condemned to lead to impasse, their purpose was to pave the ground for what Dr Schäuble had decided was ‘optimal’ well before our government was even elected: That Greece should be eased out of the Eurozone in order to discipline member-states resisting his very specific plan for re-structuring the Eurozone.

14
Summer Season Sneak Peek

See what’s in store this summer on an all-new season of MythBusters, including Adam's goosebump-inducing brush with space.

15
Denmark generated 140% of its national energy needs through wind power yesterday

While wind levels yesterday were much higher than normal, it is estimated that Denmark could be producing half of its energy from renewable sources before 2020. The government aims to be producing 84 per cent of Denmark's electricity needs through wind power by 2035.

16
Get ready for hybrid thinking

Two hundred million years ago, our mammal ancestors developed a new brain feature: the neocortex. This stamp-sized piece of tissue (wrapped around a brain the size of a walnut) is the key to what humanity has become. Now, futurist Ray Kurzweil suggests, we should get ready for the next big leap in brain power, as we tap into the computing power in the cloud.

17
The power of time off

Every seven years, designer Stefan Sagmeister closes his New York studio for a yearlong sabbatical to rejuvenate and refresh their creative outlook. He explains the often overlooked value of time off and shows the innovative projects inspired by his time in Bali.

18
100s Of Civilians Plan To Monitor Possible Military Takeover Of Texas

If President Barack Obama really is planning to implement martial law under the guise of a military training exercise beginning Wednesday, hundreds of civilian volunteers will be ahead of him.

19
How to make creative cities -- from buildings to buses

The greatest project of all is day-to-day life. “We realized in a moment of navel-gazing that the biggest project we’ve had is the studio itself and how our work and approach has evolved over 20 years,” Heatherwick says. “We’re not experts at anything, but we’re experts at not being experts, and we’ve developed a system to do this.” That means thinking large and then zooming in close, doing research and analysis, hunting down the real problem to solve, and asking questions and breaking that down “until the real thing is discovered.” At the studio, designers test and experiment with materials to see how people respond to its touch and feel. “There is a great responsibility, because some of the things we create are among the biggest objects made by we wee humans,” he says.

20
Facebook is making it easier to declutter your News Feed

Facebook's News Feed is unquestionably one of the most important parts of the site — it's the first thing you see when you visit, and the quality of that experience probably dictates to a large degree how useful you find Facebook in general. The company has spent a lot of time working on ways to make sure it  surfaces interesting and relevant content — but no matter how good its algorithms are, there's  a good chance that your page is often littered with stuff from "friends" you're not that close with and pages you've liked over the years that you can't remember liking in the first place.

21 Forbes Tech

Forgot your password?

22
The unheard story of David and Goliath

It's a classic underdog tale: David, a young shepherd armed only with a sling, beats Goliath, the mighty warrior. The story has transcended its biblical origins to become a common shorthand for unlikely victory. But, asks Malcolm Gladwell, is that really what the David and Goliath story is about?

23
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video

About 1,000 companies make smartphones. Just one reaps nearly all the profits. Apple recorded 92% of the total operating income from the eight top smartphone makers in the first quarter, up from 65% a year earlier.

24
A visual history of inequality in industrial America

For the last 12 years, LaToya Ruby Frazier has photographed friends, neighbors and family in Braddock, Pennsylvania. But though the steel town has lately been hailed as a posterchild of "rustbelt revitalization," Frazier's pictures tell a different story, of the real impact of inequality and environmental toxicity. In this short, powerful talk, the TED Fellow shares a deeply personal glimpse of an often-unseen world.

25
Your next selfie could be your last, Russia warns

The "Safe Selfie" pamphlet ( PDF ) released Tuesday depicts dangerous selfie situations in the style of roadside warning signs. In one, a figure holds a selfie stick in front of an oncoming train, above a caption that reads: "A selfie on the railway tracks is a bad idea if you value your life." Other graphics urge people to not take selfies in the company of tigers or while holding a gun. "A cool selfie could cost you your life," the leaflet reads. The ministry has also released a public safety video that includes risky shots taken by smartphone users.

26
New Horizons spacecraft now within Pluto's sphere of influence

The New Horizons spacecraft has officially entered Pluto's neighborhood. NASA mission specialist Alex Parker tweeted today that the probe has entered the area of space where Pluto exerts more gravitational influence than the Sun does. That means New Horizons has entered into Pluto's sphere of influence — also known as its Hill sphere.

27
A 17-year-old invented an ingenious way to instantly stop bleeding

Suneris The first product in the rollout is a five-pack of 5-milliliter syringes that costs $150. Landolina says Suneris has its sights set on a US rollout first, followed by a release in Europe and Asia sometime early next year. The company has partnered with VetPlus , a British company focused on animal medicine, to expand its manufacturing across the pond.

28
No one ever wants to admit the real reason to buy a Kindle

"I wouldn't be caught dead reading it in book form, but on a Kindle it was easily disguised!" one Business Insider reporter said of her "Fifty Shades" experience.

29
Man killed by lightning because of selfie stick? - CNET

Technically Incorrect: A walker in Wales is struck by lightning and reports suggest that his metal selfie stick may have attracted the bolt.

30
Cliff-clinging concept house offers stomach-churning views - CNET

Casa Brutale, from design network OPA (Open Platform for Architecture), is not for people with vertigo or fear of heights. It hangs over a cliff in an upside-down "L" shape. The top is a swimming pool with a glass side looking out over the edge of the cliff. Massive glass windows give the home unobstructed views outward, emphasizing the sheer drop beyond.

31
Accelerators Are The New Business School

It’s no secret that most startups fail. What’s a bit less obvious is that most startup accelerators also fail. While a few top-tier programs get the cream of the crop unicorns of the future, the hundreds of others struggle to attract teams that will produce the investment-grade companies on which their models so depend.

32
How the Olympics rotted Greece

The project was part of a mismanaged economic fantasy that has helped put Greece in a hole. Yet in this, as in so many of its missteps over the last 15 years, Greece was enabled by an agency in the wealthy heart of Europe. The IOC, nestling comfortably among the banks in Switzerland, should have known better. But the IOC, eager to distribute Olympic profits to its stakeholders (the National Olympic Committees and the international sports federations) and to promote the interests of its corporate partners (the sponsors and broadcasters), seems not to care. It brings its circus to town for 17 days and then, after the final fireworks end the most expensive party in the world, leaves, never to return. The host must clear up the broken bottles.

33
Meet The Children Who Live In Ghana's Hellish Digital Dump

Nor do most people think of dumps like the one in Ghana when they drop off a laptop or phone for recycling. But recyclers don't always recycle: Since labor costs and environmental laws make electronics expensive to process in a place like the U.S., companies can often make more money by selling old gadgets to waste traders who ship to Asia and Africa. The majority end up in China, followed by India, Nigeria, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Benin, and Liberia.

34
A Look Into the Innovative Mind of One of the World's Most Inventive Architects

Soon after graduation, with Conran as a mentor, he founded Heatherwick Studio. What was then a small undertaking—just Heatherwick and fellow RCA graduate Jonathan Thomas—is, 20 years later, a bustling warren of nearly 200 designers, architects and “makers.” This diverse staff is the other reason Heatherwick’s range of projects is so broad: the team is highly collaborative, and because their skills are so varied their projects can be too. “It’s more stimulating to always be doing something different,” he explains. “We never want the illusion of solid ground.”

35
Could We End Road Rage If You Could Just Send A Smiley Face To Other Drivers?

this is a start, but better yet, redo the drivers ed program & pattern it after germany. 1st of all, the u.s. kind of hands out drivers licenses as if it were candy. it should b harder to get a driver's license than it is now. driver's ed should teach drivers to think of others. don't park in the passing lanes. pass quickly & pull over 4 the next driver. don't pull into a lane unless u know u won't b slowing someone down. if someone is tailgating u, it could b that they r running late due to circumstances beyond their control, in spite of having started early on their trip. or they could have an emergency. pull over to let them by. in some states the cops r cracking down on people parking in the passing lane. they r also cracking down on the people that cause road rage incidents to begin with (it's about time). don't speed up when someone is trying to pass u on a 2 way road. it's not only illegal in some states, but also dangerous & has caused deadly accidents. it really boils down to thinking of others u share the road with.

36
The insane ways your phone and computer can be hacked — even if they're not connected to the internet

The insane ways your phone and computer can be hacked — even if they're not connected to the internet

37
This tiny house carved out of a single tree could be in Hobbiton instead of Haida Gwaii

The trees are BIG on the islands of Haida Gwaii (formerly known as the Queen Charlotte Island)- big enough that you could actually live in them. Artist, raconteur and fly fisherman Noel Wotten of Sitka Studio in the town of Tlell demonstrates this with this incredible space that he carved out of the stump of a single tree.

38
Joss Whedon's next project is a comic series about a "Victorian female Batman"

By the end of filming Age of Ultron , Joss Whedon made it clear that he was more than ready to move onto something else — something that a big studio wouldn't meddle with. During comic publisher Dark Horse's Comic-Con panel this afternoon, Whedon announced that his next project is something much smaller: a new comic called Twist , which will be coming out next year. "It deals with the most important moral question facing us, which is: Why isn't there a Victorian female Batman?" That's all we know so far, but it sounds amazing. Six issues of the series will be out next year. Cover art was shown during the panel, and it should end up online soon.

39
What Startups Can Learn From The Art Market

What lessons can start-ups learn from Durand-Ruel? First, they can build a "Vibe"—a vibrating, volatile, social and economic space. Second, shaping a Vibe and building a volatile space significantly boosts the chances of generating innovation. Third, a Vibe can have a market structure, as in art auctions, but in the case of incubators and art galleries most of volatility comes from opaque, personal relationships—the role of Curator-Patron is as critical to innovation as that of the creative.

40
IGN on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

41
air-conditioned shirt

Air conditioned shirt keeps you cool while looking professional; so you can keep your cool. This air-conditioned short has two fans (on either side near the back of this dress shirt) that force cool air under the clothing and out through the collar and cuff openings. Perfect for those long, hot summer days stuck at the office. I've explored alternative clothing to keep cool at work before, and this air-conditioned shirt is a fine additional to my cooling arsenal. I was inspired to make the air conditioned shirt after seeing the commercially available one from Kuchofuku (Japan). They are the " only one company in the world " that makes them, and they retail retail for $138. Using reclaimed computer fans, scrap electronics, and a dapper dress shirt from the thrift store, I was able to make this AC Shirt for around $10 - and can work with almost any type or style of shirt or pants. Ready? Let's make!

42
Event Pokemon - Pokemon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire Wiki Guide - IGN

To get these Pokemon, you must choose "Mystery Gift" at the main menu of your Pokemon Omega Ruby or Alpha Sapphire game. The next step depends on the method of distribution. Some Pokemon are distributed over the internet, some are at select areas via wireless connection, and some are obtained through special codes.

43
Find every company flying drones near you with our new search tool

A precision agriculture firm in Charles City, Iowa. A builder performing roof inspection from Carlisle, Kentucky. A company monitoring explosive charges based in Ijamesville, Maryland. A security firm conducting surveillance over private property in Cottage Grove, Oregon. These are just a handful of the businesses now allowed to fly drones over US soil.

44
7 Rejections

On June 26, 2008, our friend Michael Seibel introduced us to 7 prominent investors in Silicon Valley. We were attempting to raise $150,000 at a $1.5M valuation. That means for $150,000 you could have bought 10% of Airbnb. Below you will see 5 rejections. The other 2 did not reply.

45
Guys, it's never ever OK to wear open-toed sandals

"I don’t want to see the hair on your toes, or your non-pedicured toes. I don’t want to know how unkempt your feet are. And it’s ok— you’re a dude. I don’t expect you to have soft, lovely feet like, for instance, I do. But that’s why there’s no need to parade them around. No gladiators, no thongs. No Rainbows — unless you're a camp counselor!"

46
Government pulls the plug on household solar

The Abbott government has opened up another front in its war on renewable energy by pulling the plug on investments in the most common form of alternative energy, rooftop and small-scale solar.

47
'It's a graveyard': The software devs leaving Greece for good | ZDNet

George Vakalopoulos worked 12 hour days, Monday to Sunday, for a small software company in Greece. He wasn't paid for six months, and even financed business trips abroad from his own pocket, hoping that things would work out. They didn't. Vakalopoulos left Greece in 2012 and is now based in Zürich, Switzerland. "I had no option other than going abroad after I delivered my project. It wasn't worth working in Athens under such conditions," he told ZDNet.

48
A first look at iOS 9: Little changes add up to something big

The biggest of the new preloaded apps is basically straight out of the oven; News first went live in the third iOS 9 developer beta, which dropped all of 24 hours ago. Considering the work that goes into building a news-reading platform from nothing, it's not a surprise we're only seeing it now, or that it's not all that pretty yet. Actually, let me rephrase: Some of the stories look great, as a handful of news providers have been working with Apple on a handsome design format. The ones that don't however, are often just a headline and some body text (at least, that's how Engadget's stories look). Still, you can tell there's something important brewing here: It offers some solid-looking stories right out of the gate, and there's plenty of depth when it comes to choosing your go-to news sources. It might just seem like a Flipboard clone for now, but I suspect the finished product will be worth keeping an eye on.

49
The first Miss America was a 16-year-old high schooler

That summer, she and the other five contestants toured the city, culminating in Margaret being awarded the title of “Miss Washington, D.C.” The prize: a place of honor at the Second Annual Atlantic City Pageant, where Margaret would be entered into the new “Inter-City Beauty” contest. Under scrutiny by judges and spectators, and peppered with questions, Gorman wooed the crowd and took the top amateur prize, then the coveted grand prize: the "Golden Mermaid" trophy.

50
OnePlus 2 specs leak ahead of July 27 debut - CNET

A new leak on Mobipicker could fill in some of the other details for the OnePlus 2. Taking them with the proverbial grain of salt, the report claims the phone could possess a 5.5-inch, 1080p HD display. That isn't as high as the 2K screens with 2,560x1,440-pixel resolutions we're seeing these days for larger phones, but it would still appear nice and sharp overall.

51 Chat Apps Take a Swipe at Facebook
52 Netflix Moves Into Original Feature Films, Starting This October
53 Wikileaks Release: Hacking Team Says It Sold Spyware To FSB, Russia's Secret Police
54 Two Cheers for the Middle Ages! by Eric Christiansen
55 The strange tale of the Norden bombsight
56 Hot Wax: Keeping Vinyl Alive
57 Pan Am Games: Link to our website without permission and we'll sue
58 F-U-N-D-E-D: Eyeing innovation, Disney sees big future in tiny companies - CNET
59 Goals Suck: Why Building Habits and Systems Makes Sense
60 8 surprising foods you've never tried to grill before
61 The most over-the-top tech billionaire vacation homes
62 Hulu pays record-breaking $192 million to keep South Park through 2019
63 The Death of Reddit
64 Why Ed Tech Is Taking Off In Latin America
65 Doppler Labs wants to change how you listen to concerts with 'hearables'
66 Popular music album covers get a 'Star Wars' makeover - CNET
67 How iOS 9 transforms the iPad (hands-on) - CNET
68 History of Awesome
69 The Sydney Opera House: 10 years late and 1,457% over budget
70 The first 6 TED Talks
71 NASA Plans To Use Nukes On Potential Doomsday Asteroid
72 Facebook reportedly in talks to put music videos in your News Feed
73 Virtual Reality Porn And The Future Of Loneliness
74 How Google tries to keep 'sneaky' spam from your inbox - CNET
75 The players in Europe's Greek-crisis Game of Thrones
76 How to install the iOS 9 public beta - CNET
77 Who Needs Google's Dreaming Robot? Just Eat Some Shrooms Instead
78 Welcome to Voat: Reddit killer, troll haven, and the strange face of internet free speech
79 Facebook's name pronunciation tool is your ticket to trolling its 'real name' policy
80 The truth about blogging on Medium
81 Dreams of an Automotive Industry in Uganda | MIT Technology Review
82 The Death of Reddit
83 There's no shame in Cristiano Ronaldo's tech-shill game
84 Reinstate conservation officer suspended for refusing to kill bear cubs, petition says
85 17 clever ways to upcycle your pool noodles
86 There are two things holding me back from recommending Samsung's Galaxy S6 over the iPhone
87 J.K. Rowling shuts down Serena Williams hater in one perfect tweet
88 How I setup an online course worth $100k