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'Star Wars' Minecraft Movie Combines Geek Dreams

A 'Star Wars' fan is creating 'Episode IV: A New Hope' entirely out of stills from the building block video game 'Minecraft.'

Reinventing the fastest forgotten archery.

Faster than Legolas! A historical technique much faster than the known. The Danish archers Lars Andersen has rediscovered. an old and very fast way to shoot ...

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1
Which celebrity has the most popular presence on Facebook?

Asked via email about reaching the 100-million fan milestone, Shakira called it "just an unfathomable number." Having the most popular page on all of Facebook is "something I never necessarily anticipated but a really welcoming and heartwarming surprise." Yet her accomplishment didn't sneak up on her: She'd been posting certain benchmarks to her fans, like breaking 50 million, and becoming the biggest celebrity page on Facebook in March, when she passed fellow pop star Rihanna. She also got a huge boost from the World Cup, with which the singer has a long association, and where she performed at the closing ceremony in Rio earlier this month. The Cup generated 3 billion Facebook interactions (posts, comments, likes and shares) from 350 million people.

2
Twitter Is About to Improve Direct Messages

On Friday night, Twitter announced that it plans to update its iPhone and Android apps, so users can view their entire direct-message history on mobile. Twitter also said it's planning to streamline the process of deleting direct messages on mobile and the web, so there's less confusion.

3
Feds declare big win over Cryptolocker ransomware

Computerworld - Even as security researchers reported that the hacker gang responsible for the Gameover Zeus botnet had begun distributing new malware, U.S. government officials last week claimed victory over the original and said that the Cryptolocker ransomware that the botnet had been pushing has been knocked out.

4 http://www.bbc.com/

5
Blackest is the new black: Scientists develop a material so dark that you can't see it...

A British company has produced a "strange, alien" material so black that it absorbs all but 0.035 per cent of visual light, setting a new world record. To stare at the "super black" coating made of carbon nanotubes – each 10,000 times thinner than a human hair – is an odd experience. It is so dark that the human eye cannot understand what it is seeing. Shapes and contours are lost, leaving nothing but an apparent abyss.

6
One Second on the Internet

In one second on the Internet there are...

7
How Turbans Helped Some Blacks Go Incognito In The Jim Crow Era

At the time, ideas of race in America were quite literally black and white. In some places, if you could pass yourself off as something other than black, you could circumvent some amount of discrimination. People of color — both foreigners and African-Americans — employed this to their advantage. Some did it just to get by in a racist society, some to make a political statement, and others — performers and businessmen — to gain access to fame and money they wouldn't have otherwise had.

8
Tesla's $35,000 car will be called the Model 3

Tesla hasn't quite delivered its new Model X SUV yet, but at least we have a name for its first electric vehicle pointed at the mainstream. In an interview with AutoExpress , CEO Elon Musk (pictured above with an old Model S prototype) revealed it will be called the Model 3 (with three bars to represent it), after Ford put the kibosh on calling it the Model E. Musk has repeatedly targeted 2017 as the release window for a smaller $35,000 vehicle . He's said it will be the third generation after the original Roadster and Model S, and in the interview claims it will have a range of over 200 miles per charge, probably using batteries built in Tesla's planned Gigafactory . Musk also told the mag about a range boost upgrade coming for the original Roadster that will give it a modern battery capable of going up to 400 miles on a charge, "which will allow you to drive from LA to San Francisco non-stop."

9
Side Drawer Navigation Could Cost Half Your User Engagement

The side menu has become fashionable on Android but not yet taken off on iPhone… and so another factor that enters the discussion is the desire for your Android and iOS apps to have similar navigation and user journeys, or not.

10
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn25894-meet-the-electric-life-forms-that-live-on-pure-energy.html

In the process, cells make ATP, a molecule that acts as an energy storage unit for almost all living things. Moving electrons around is a key part of making ATP. "Life's very clever," says Nealson. "It figures out how to suck electrons out of everything we eat and keep them under control." In most living things, the body packages the electrons up into molecules that can safely carry them through the cells until they are dumped on to oxygen.

11 The hacker who went to war with Riot Games

Here's how he claimed it happened: During their first bout of bruteforcing passwords in the 2012 North America attack, Duffy's group obtained details for a senior staff member. Aware of the breach, Riot told its employees to change their passwords, but Duffy claims this one employee did not. Through this account, the group was able to access Riot’s servers. Once inside, they dropped in backdoor software that gave them ongoing access to the servers. Riot didn’t detect the backdoor until one of his colleagues got "sloppy," Duffy said.

12
18 Ways English Differs From Whatever The Hell Language We Text In

To prove our point, we went through our own phones to figure out how the English language differs from whatever the hell it is we use when texting. Here’s what we figured out.

13
Why You Feel Terrible After Spending Too Much Time On Facebook

Next time you’re in a bad mood, resist the urge to try and cheer yourself up by checking Facebook. It likely won’t work, according to a recent study.

14
Smelling farts could be the best thing you do today - CNET

Hydrogen sulfide, commonly found in rotten eggs and human flatulence, could have significant health benefits in small doses, researchers at the University of Exeter say.

15
Google Offers A Free Crash Course In Android Development | TechCrunch

The Android course is presented by Google Developer Advocates Reto Meier, Dan Galpin and Katherine Kuan, and also features personalized feedback and direct guidance from coaches for students who are also enrolled in Udacity’s paid, guided subscription program. The aim of the program is to provide context regarding the history of Android and its creation, as well as teach you how to build actual Android software, with the aim of getting devs to the point where they can think in terms of Android programming instead of just shoehorning their existing experience onto the platform.

16
GoTenna creates a cell network out of thin air anywhere on Earth - CNET

GoTenna , a Brooklyn-based hardware startup, has a modified, smartphone app-based approach to staying in touch at a lower cost when cell service is shaky, no satellite connection required. The device, a thin 2-ounce wand that can be strapped to a backpack or belt loop, connects to a smartphone app via Bluetooth low energy (LE). Slide out the antenna and power on the device and you'll then be able to send messages and GPS coordinates from your smartphone to others connected to a GoTenna. The company offers downloadable, high-resolution offline maps for referencing transmitted location data.

17
How Becoming a Father Changes Your Brain | Science Blogs | WIRED

Well, the scientist in me is pleased to see this development, but actually I have to say the researchers’ discussion about the possible future applications of their research left me feeling a little uncomfortable. Their hope is that future research combining structural and functional data will give them a better idea of the brain changes typically seen in a well-adjusted father who has formed a healthy attachment with his offspring. This information, they explained, could then be used to identify “distinct changes in the parental brain among at-risk fathers in order to construct more specific and early interventions.” This conjured for me a creepy image of fathers having their brains scanned to see if they have suitably bonded to their babies. Certainly any developments along these lines would require a lot more research and have to be handled with extreme care. Imagine the potential hurt if a neural “mis-diagnosis” were made.

18
The TheTechNewsBlog Daily

The TheTechNewsBlog Daily, by TheTechNewsBlog: updated automatically with a curated selection of articles, blog posts, videos and photos.

19
Will Light Field Photography Replace DSLRs? Lytro's CEO Says Yes

So what we ended up doing with the Lytro Illum is we took that audience and we got together with that market and the capabilities that these people really like and we put that on steroids. There’s a bigger, much higher resolution sensor. A brand new light field lens designed from the ground up gives you optical capabilities that you can’t get in any other camera and then we put massive computational power inside the camera. It’s the equivalent of taking a third-generation iPad Air and putting it right inside a high-end camera.

20
Can meditation really slow ageing?

Others aren’t so impressed. Surgeon-oncologist David Gorski is a well-known critic of alternative medicine and pseudoscience who blogs under the name of Orac – he’s previously described Dean Ornish as “one of the four horsemen of the Woo-pocalypse”. Gorski stops short of pronouncing meditation as off-limits for scientific inquiry, but expresses concern that the preliminary results of these studies are being oversold. How can the researchers be sure they’re investigating it rigorously? “It’s really hard to do with these things,” he says. “It is easy to be led astray. Nobel Prize-winners are not infallible.” Blackburn’s own biochemistry community also seems ambivalent about her interest in meditation. Three senior telomere researchers I contacted declined to discuss this aspect of her work, with one explaining that he didn’t want to comment “on such a controversial issue”.

21
Save $9, Here Are The TechCrunch Staff’s Email Addresses | TechCrunch

I hate email. But there’s one thing I hate even more: people selling my email address. Currently trending at the top of Product Hunt , Pressfarm is an email database for tech journalists — and it’s not free.

22
The Difference Between New York City Animals and Animals Everywhere Else

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 34 million unique visitors worldwide and 15 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

23
15 Twitter Facts and Figures for 2014 You Need to Know - Jeffbullas's Blog

The social media network that was never meant to be a social network, Twitter, celebrated its eighth birthday in March, 2014. The now microblogging giant has come a long way since co-founder Jack Dorsey’s first tweet, “just setting up my twttr” back on March 21, 2006.

24
It Is Idiotic To Hand Out Your Twitter Password To Prove Passwords Are Dead

Ironically, you need a WSJ password to read the piece. But his handing out his password happens in the first paragraph which all can read, and it was, quite honestly, the only novel part of the piece. The rest explains device-based authentication to people who haven’t been paying attention to tech security, and haven’t set it up already for their Google, Facebook, Twitter, Yahoo, Bank of America, Paypal, or fill-in-the-online-service-here accounts. As a journalism stunt to get clicks it was brilliant but as a practical approach to security, it was very dumb. So what happened after he handed his password out? The obvious. A whole bunch of people tried to log into his Twitter account. And every time one did, Mims got a text message with a verification code. He said on Twitter that he started receiving two text messages every minute. He finally switched to getting the code via a designated “Twitter for iPhone” app, but there was still an option to send a verification code to his phone, and when you clicked on that, it revealed Mims’s full phone number, starting with a 301 Maryland area code.

25
Mozilla Launches Improved JPEG Encoder | TechCrunch

Mozilla is in a position where its support for a new format could put quite a bit weight behind it. To clear this hurdle, though, a new format would have to offer a significant improvement over the existing ones. Gal admitted that formats like WebP offer a number of other features that aren’t available in JPEG (like animations), but for Mozilla, that hasn’t been enough to support it yet. He does, however, believe that some of the newer formats will offer significant improvements. The problem with many of those is that they are encumbered by patents so it may be a while before we will see Mozilla support those (if ever). Instead, the format he seems to think has the largest potential to be included in Firefox is Daala , a new video compression technology (with applications for images as well), that Mozilla is working on in partnership with the Xiph.Org foundation.

26
Do You Feel Pressure Or Do You Apply Pressure? | TechCrunch

In this case, everyone is under-empowered to make the right decision and get you what you want. The key to delegation is better empowerment. You could simply give the head of engineering the ability to say “no” to everything, but you may well miss all your sales forecasts and cause yourself an even bigger problem. A better approach would be to formalize the change process. You can say that once a project begins, you can alter its definition, resources, priorities or schedule, but doing so requires a formal meeting with all the stakeholders and the CEO. At that meeting, all changes and their potential consequences will be discussed and a decision will be reached. If you implement such a process, you will find that the number of changes drops by an order of magnitude. By simply making it more difficult to make a change, you will apply pressure to the team to find another way to make the sales number.

27
Should we eat bugs? - Emma Bryce

What's tasty, abundant and high in protein? Bugs! Although less common outside the tropics, entomophagy, the practice of eating bugs, was once extremely widespread throughout cultures. You may feel icky about munching on insects, but they feed about 2 billion people each day (Mmm, fried tarantulas). They also hold promise for food security and the environment. Emma Bryce makes a compelling case for dining on bugs.

28
Yo Raises $1.5M In Funding At A $10M Valuation, Investors Include Betaworks And Pete Cashmore | TechCrunch

Yo , the simple app that just sends a “yo” to your friends, has closed $1.5 million in seed funding with a $10 million valuation and is finally ready to talk about its investors. They include Betaworks, Mashable’s Pete Cashmore, and the founders of China’s Tencent, among others.

29
20 Starry-Eyed Summer Romance Confessions

You and your summer fling may spend every minute attached at the lips, but your fleeting romance probably won't last past Labor Day. Mashable asked secret-posting app Whisper to share some of the best confessions regarding summer flings.

30
Add a battery-saving, E Ink display to your phone for $79

One of the drawbacks inherent with our variety of smart devices is short battery life , but the folks behind the InkCase Plus think they have the solution for perhaps the most-used gadget in your arsenal: your phone. The InkCase Plus hits Kickstarter today , and like its name suggests, it's a folio case for your phone that packs an always-on E Ink display. If this sounds kinda familiar, that's because the company launched something similar last year for the iPhone 5 and Samsung Galaxy S II. Now, however, it's available for the Galaxy S5 (or whatever other phone models get at least 500 votes from the pledging community), packs Bluetooth low-energy connectivity and it can act as a modular second screen, with access to apps and notifications . The campaign page promises 18 hours of reading time thanks to the energy-miserly nature of e-paper, and that you can transfer the likes of boarding passes and shopping lists to it too. Sounds pretty handy, yeah?

31
11 Tips for Creating a Successful Interactive Video

So what do you need to know to build your own IV? From choosing an IV platform that’s right for you, to figuring out where to put your first choice point, here are our 11 top tips to keep in mind to create a successful and engaging interactive video.

32
Why Companies Should Kill Job Titles

The person with passion will bring a broad knowledge of the space to the table and is eager to learn from the person with the skill. The person with the want will ask the questions that will spark discussions that wouldn’t otherwise happen. The wants person will also encourage the other two to show off their skills and passions in the space.

33
Fantastically Wrong: The Strange History of Using Organ-Shaped Plants to Treat Disease | Science | WIRED

It’s hard to imagine being the first human being to look at a plant like, say, a stinging nettle and think, “I probably shouldn’t eat this, on account of the general agony it would cause me. But what if I cooked it first?” So you prepare it and nervously drop it down your gullet—and luckily enough, it turns out to be edible. But what if it hadn’t been? And what if there wasn’t a decent gastroenterologist nearby?

34
This Guy Wants $22,000 To Make An iPhone Handle

The following is, by far, the most confusing use of Fonhandle: using it to take selfies. The invention allows you to hold the phone farther away than you could with your arm, though you'll need an app to make the iPhone take a self-timer photo. (Another option is to just hold the phone up with your actual arm, like a regular person.)

35
Need a 3D printer? Hit the hardware store - CNET

Esha Horton hovers over it, making adjustments while simultaneously fielding rapid-fire questions from customers. Horton works for Makerbot, and the display is the first of its kind for Home Depot: a 3D printer -- the fifth-generation MakerBot Replicator, to be exact. Nine other Home Depot stores in California, Illinois, and New York are likewise hosting 3D printing displays and selling the printers. The effort is the result of a partnership between the hardware superstore chain and MakerBot, which has been selling 3D printers for the last five years. Watch our CNET News video to learn more about the pilot project.

36
How quantum mechanics explains global warming - Lieven Scheire

You’ve probably heard that carbon dioxide is warming the Earth. But how exactly is it doing it? Lieven Scheire uses a rainbow, a light bulb and a bit of quantum physics to describe the science behind global warming.

37
5 dangerous things you should let your kids do

At TED U, Gever Tulley, founder of the Tinkering School, spells out 5 dangerous things you should let your kids do — and why a little danger is good for both kids and grownups.

38
The mysterious workings of the adolescent brain

Why do teenagers seem so much more impulsive, so much less self-aware than grown-ups? Cognitive neuroscientist Sarah-Jayne Blakemore compares the prefrontal cortex in adolescents to that of adults, to show us how typically “teenage” behavior is caused by the growing and developing brain.

39
What Every Company Should Know About Agile Software Development | MIT Technology Review

An agile team’s goal is to deliver narrow, fully-functional slices of the project at the end of each iteration (usually one to two weeks in length). Perhaps a website’s basic login functionality—from the user interface all the way down to the database—is built during this iteration; next iteration, a “forgot password” feature might be added, and so on. Each slice is demonstrated to end users and stakeholders at the end of the iteration so they can provide feedback on what’s been built so far and guide priorities for future iterations. As you can imagine, this approach makes adapting to the changing marketplace a whole lot easier and makes your software more relevant for customers.

40
Amazon Wants You To Pay $120 For A Glorified Library Card

The service, " Kindle Unlimited ," is essentially an e-book version of your free neighborhood library, except it costs money. For $9.99 a month, or about $120 a year, you can read more than 600,000 e-books and 2,000 audiobooks. (It also comes with a three-month Audible membership, giving you access to another 150,000 audiobooks.) In its press release , Amazon highlighted available selections like those of the "Harry Potter," "Lord of the Rings" and "Hunger Games" series.

41
Babies, Now With GPS [COMIC]

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 34 million unique visitors worldwide and 15 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

42
Superintelligence: Machines Smarter Than Humans

Humans are currently the most intelligent beings on the planet — the result of a long history of evolutionary pressure and adaptation. But could we some day design and build machines that surpass the human intellect?

43
25 Business Books that You Won't See on Most Bookshelves

The fact is, however, that great relationships can be built on sincere connections and respect, and those are the best way to avoid “Field of Dreams Syndrome”—thinking that if you build it, they will come (they won’t.)

44
THE SNAPCHAT REPORT: Audience Numbers, Demographics, And Brands' Early Marketing Efforts

In a new report from BI Intelligence , we provide an exclusive estimate of Snapchat's monthly active users, and break down the app's demographics to help brands and businesses decide whether they need to be on Snapchat. The app is definitely emerging as a key medium for targeted marketing and messaging aimed at teens and millennials. The report also spotlights the opportunities ahead, as users embrace new features like "Stories," which are collections of videos and photos that don't self-destruct. 

45
I'm 22 Years Old, And I Grew Up Without The Internet

I immediately realized that I was missing out on a fantastic way to flirt with girls. I still remember being shocked when I watched my friend sign off a chat session with a casual "AML" (All My Love). He had only been dating this girl for a week, and he was already tossing around the L-word? I can only imagine my look of confusion as he insisted that it somehow didn't mean as much over the internet, that is was just how people talked.

46
US government says online storage isn't protected by the Fourth Amendment

A couple months ago, a New York judge ruled that US search warrants applied to digital information even if they were stored overseas. The decision came about as part of an effort to dig up a Microsoft user's account information stored on a server in Dublin, Ireland. Microsoft responded to the ruling and challenged it, stating that the government's longstanding views of digital content on foreign servers are wrong, and that the protections applied to physical materials should be extended to digital content. In briefs filed last week, however, the US government countered. It states that according to the Stored Communications Act (SCA), content stored online simply do not have the same Fourth Amendment protections as physical data:

47
Imgur Adds Tagging And Custom Galleries, So You Can Actually Find The Meme You’re Looking For | TechCrunch

The tags, by the way, don’t have to be straightforward categories. Schaaf is hoping that they’ll be funny or clever, without going completely off-topic or losing sight of Imgur’s focus on “niceness.” When you look at an image, all user-submitted tags should be visible, but only the two most popular ones will be used for all the sorting functionality that I just described.

48
U.N. Says Governments Are Increasingly Relying On Private Sector For Surveillance | TechCrunch

Whistleblower Edward Snowden’s leaks last year about U.S. and British mass surveillance are an example of when technology is misused. The report highlighted that these technologies were deployed through a transnational network made of “strategic intelligence relationships between governments and regulatory control of private companies and commercial contracts.”

49
11 Simple Inventions That Could Change The World

We have a tendency to lionize mankind's mind-bogglingly complex inventions. It's why we teach our children about the Alexander Graham Bells and Thomas Edisons of the world, and scour the Internet for every little iPhone rumor we can find.

50
Soylent survivor: one month living on lab-made liquid nourishment

Social challenge cropped up almost daily. Lunch meetings and briefings weren’t really an option, unless I wanted to awkwardly nurse a thermos full of Soylent in a restaurant while others ate (I didn’t). Weekly office-wide trips for dollar fish tacos on Monday nights were off limits. And I had to pass on having drinks with a friend, eventually meeting up to sip on a calorie-free, nutrient-free Diet Coke while he enjoyed some of the most delicious-looking beer I’d ever seen. (There’s an argument to be made that I should’ve cut diet sodas out of the Soylent experiment, too, but I had to draw the line somewhere — I wasn’t ready to survive on water, tea, and coffee alone.)

51 Northern Canada is On Fire, And It's Making Global Warming Worse
52 The Moral Hazards and Legal Conundrums of Our Robot-Filled Future | Science | WIRED
53 Here’s why your Comcast rep is yelling at you
54 http://www.tdpf.org.uk/blog/world-health-organization-calls-decriminalisation-drug-use
55 8 Places for Thrifty Bookworms to Download Free E-Books
56 Why the Internet of Things Narrative Has to Change
57 Report: Climate changing more rapidly than at any point on record
58 The Middle East Friendship Chart
59 Google Search On Mobile Now Warns When A Site Won’t Work On Your Device | TechCrunch
60 10 Ways to Dress Like an Adult Baby
61 Startup Makes a New Kind of Flexible, Printed Battery | MIT Technology Review
62 When Amazon Acts Like A Start-up: Why Amazon Has Entered The Ebook Subscription Market
63 Instagram User Finds Inspiration Inside a Cheetos Bag
64 Facebook Tests Buy Button To Let You Purchase Stuff Without Leaving Facebook | TechCrunch
65 Halo TV, Halo: Nightfall On Track Despite Xbox Entertainment Studios Closure - IGN
66 10 DIY Air Fresheners to Make Your Home Smell Good
67 Hostels Embrace Airbnb in Effort to Escape Rising Booking Fees
68 Must Reads: The #Longreads You Missed This Week
69 Scientists Call for Careful Regulation of Genome Editing
70 We Saw Two New Scenes from Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles - IGN
71 Watch an AlphaDog robot venture into (simulated) battle for the first time
72 Floret Is A Gamified Dating App For Virtual Romance | TechCrunch
73 159 Awesome Android Apps for Summer 2014
74 LinkedIn Acquires Newsle To Deliver More Relevant News About Your Connections | TechCrunch
75 PC Dominates Gaming Hardware Sales - IGN
76 Crown of the Sunken King - Dark Souls II Wiki Guide - IGN
77 Lying commies
78 Fujifilm Instax Share SP-1 printer review - CNET
79 Live Updates on MH17: Confusion Surrounds Black Box Location
80 Wear part of the Starship Enterprise on your wrist - CNET
81 Documentary Photography and Photojournalism: Still Images of a World in Motion
82 Filecoin is a data storage network and electronic currency based on Bitcoin.
83 Verizon Is Twitter-Stalking Competitors' Angry Customers
84 No signal? GoTenna has a messaging gadget that will work in the middle of nowhere
85 Google Enlists Novartis To Ship Glucose-Sensing And Autofocus Smart Contact Lenses In As Little As 5 Years | TechCrunch
86 Samsung In Talks To Scoop Up SmartThings For Around $200 Million | TechCrunch
87 Start Before You're Ready, Really
88 Tight squeeze? Squishy robots could go from hard to soft - CNET
89 London WW2 bomb shelter reclaimed for underground farming (pictures) - CNET
90 An Open Letter To Janet Yellen: Is There A Biotech Bubble?
91 The 12 Best Toys Of Tech's Wealthiest Executives
92 Kim Kardashian May Make $85 Million From Her Video Game
93 Yellen Fire In The Biotech Theater
94 THE PROGRAMMATIC ADVERTISING REPORT: Mobile, Video, and Real-Time Bidding Will Catapult Programmatic Ad Spend