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Watch as Coney Island hot dog-eating champ defends his 8-year title streak

Joey Chestnut is going for his ninth win in the Coney Island hot dog contest.

A YouTuber removed her makeup to reveal the Internet's harsh beauty standards

A YouTube user received dozens of shaming comments about her looks and decided to fight back against false images of perfection.

Watch Kendrick Lamar's bold, cinematic video for 'Alright'

Kendrick Lamar's magnum opus To Pimp a Butterfly didn't have many obvious single candidates, but the smooth, soulful Pharrell production "Alright" was one of them. It now has an ambitious music...

Watch an F-16 fighter jet blast a drone out of the air - CNET

A Danish fighter jet shows off top-gun skills for the modern age by taking out a flying drone with spectacular accuracy.

1,776 times American aircraft did something completely badass

Okay, actually, it's only five times — I couldn't resist the "1776" symbolism in the headline. Forgive me. What you're about to see below are five situations where American aircraft, built from...

The most beautiful (and ridiculous) blunts known to man

This artist specializes in creating ridiculous-looking blunts, like helicopters.

NASA dropped this Cessna 82 feet... for your safety

NASA filmed a plane crash with 40 cameras... for your safety, of course.

Meet the man building a stock exchange that doesn’t screw people over

Welcome to our new series — How did you get that job? — where we’ll run interviews with interesting people about their work and how they came to be doing it. When Brad Katsuyama came to the US in...

'We've made hope return to Europe' - in conversation with Paul Mason on Ch4

Visit the post for more.

25 Things to Know About Apple Music

Apple Music arrives today. Here's how to get it and what you get once you sign up.

The Underfunded, Disorganized Plan to Save Earth from the Next Giant Asteroid

Meet the interstellar warriors of Spaceguard.

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Top News
1
Samsung and Oppo sued over bloatware in China

The commissions biggest complaint is that neither company informed consumers about the number of apps pre-installed on the handsets and that consumers are not offered any information on how to uninstall those which they don’t want. The legal case is seeking a ruling that would require Samsung and Oppo to label the apps on packaging and to provide instructions on how to remove said apps.

2
How I grew a startup the hard way

A report from CB Insights points to a number of reasons startups fail, and many of them correlate with an inability to scale effectively. Factors, such as getting outcompeted (19 percent), lost focus (13 percent) and team disharmony (13 percent), all relate to people doing too much work or certain tasks going overlooked. Personally, I’ve learned that as companies grow, they go through a series of phases.

3
Hyundai sees hydrogen fuel cell cars as the future

Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles emit only water vapor as exhaust. They also have remarkable advantages over all-electric vehicles, such as the Tesla Model S, in that they can travel 300 miles on a tank of fuel and can refuel in just five minutes. By comparison, a Tesla using the company's so-called "Superchargers" requires at least 20 minutes to achieve a half-charged battery. A full charge will provide a range of up to 265 miles. Toyota's RAV4 electric vehicle can go a maximum of 125 miles on one charge.

4
Making your design portfolio stand out in 2015

You know what sets a design portfolio apart these days? It’s not a designer’s experience, beautiful visuals or the number of clients. It’s the way you communicate those things.

5
The unbelievable story behind the 'Back to Back World War Champs' tank top

that features an American flag accompanied by a simple slogan "Back to Back World War Champs." The success of the tank top spurred Grandex to slap the slogan on a plethora of items including koozies, hats and posters.

6
Internet.org by Facebook

7 MIT Technology Review

English (US)

8
Adidas Knit These Sneakers Entirely From Ocean Plastic Trash

For now, they'll turn to sources like fishing nets and easier-to-reach beach trash for their material source; Liedtke says they have no worries about finding enough to supply the line of shoes when it launches later this year. They won't be using the tiny fragments of plastic that swirl, soup-like, in places like the Pacific Gyre, though that could change as new technology becomes available. "If you want to take it out of the ocean, you can trawl for days and days and get a tiny spoonful of plastic," Gutsch says. "At this point we didn't see a feasible technology. What we believe now is that you can instead avoid the microplastic that's coming into the system."

9
Call Them Hippies, But the Grateful Dead Were Tech Pioneers | WIRED

Out in the trenches, new technologies are perhaps forming in response to these reunion appearances. Only a few years ago, a crew of jam fans created GroupMe, a group texting app ideal for mass communications at shows and festivals, eventually selling it to Skype for millions. Probably, there will be Deadheads using it to find one another in Chicago and Santa Clara, if they haven’t already adapted to some newer tech. Heads continue to play with new configurations, lately including the Bluetooth-enabled Zoku. Billing itself as “the Secret Society App” to anonymously find “tribes off-the-grid in real life,”  Zoku works even when the Deadheads inevitably overload the local cell network, as they did during the shows in California. Others are in various stages of development. The secondary ticket market for the Dead shows has been the hugest of the summer, according to StubHub, but the fans also have the Deadhead-friendly face-value ticket site/app CashOrTrade at their disposal to level the playing field a bit.

10
The first 21 days of a bee’s life

We’ve heard that bees are disappearing. But what is making bee colonies so vulnerable? Photographer Anand Varma raised bees in his backyard — in front of a camera — to get an up close view. This project, for National Geographic, gives a lyrical glimpse into a beehive, and reveals one of the biggest threats to its health, a mite that preys on baby bees in their first 21 days of life. With footage set to music from Rob Moose and the Magik*Magik Orchestra, Varma shows the problem ... and what’s being done to solve it. (This talk was part of a session at TED2015 guest-curated by Pop-Up Magazine: popupmagazine.com or @popupmag on Twitter.)

11
Dear Veronica: Behind the Scenes with Sirron Norris

Veronica Belmont Interviews street artist Sirron Norris » Read more here: http://www.engadget.com/2015/06/06/de... Get More Engadget: » Subscribe to Engadget on YouTube: http://engt.co/subscribe » Like on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/engadget » Follow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/engadget » Read: http://www.engadget.com Technology isn't all about bits and processors. It's the car with no driver, human organs printed in a lab and leisurely flights into space. It's the future and Engadget is here to tell you all about it. Since 2004, we've covered cutting edge devices and the technology that powers them. As we enter our second decade, we're looking beyond the gadgets themselves to explore how they impact our lives. Engadget is the definitive guide to this connected life.

12
How giant websites design for you (and a billion others, too)

Facebook’s “like” and “share” buttons are seen 22 billion times a day, making them some of the most-viewed design elements ever created. Margaret Gould Stewart, Facebook’s director of product design, outlines three rules for design at such a massive scale—one so big that the tiniest of tweaks can cause global outrage, but also so large that the subtlest of improvements can positively impact the lives of many.

13
Programming bacteria to detect cancer (and maybe treat it)

Liver cancer is one of the most difficult cancers to detect, but synthetic biologist Tal Danino had a left-field thought: What if we could create a probiotic, edible bacteria that was "programmed" to find liver tumors? His insight exploits something we're just beginning to understand about bacteria: their power of quorum sensing, or doing something together once they reach critical mass. Danino, a TED Fellow, explains how quorum sensing works — and how clever bacteria working together could someday change cancer treatment.

14
YC-Backed Livecoding.tv Is Twitch.tv For Coding

Livecoding.tv was founded by Dr. MJG and Jamie Green. Livecoding.tv is a business that was sparked by the problems that Michael and Jamie faced when they first learned to code. They both faced a similar struggle when they reached basic level of ability, but wanted to take their coding to the next level. Now they want to solve this problem for the next generation of coders, wherever they are in the …

15
This Is Why No One Follows You on Twitter

But first, it's a good idea to take a look at how most people will see your Twitter profile. If someone finds you in his or her Home stream, or clicks on a "Who to follow" suggestion, the Profile Summary pop-up below shows what your potential audience sees of your Twitter presence.

16
Why city flags may be the worst-designed thing you've never noticed

Roman Mars is obsessed with flags — and after you watch this talk, you might be, too. These ubiquitous symbols of civic pride are often designed, well, pretty terribly. But they don't have to be. In this surprising and hilarious talk about vexillology — the study of flags — Mars reveals the five basic principles of flag design and shows why he believes they can be applied to just about anything.

17
How to let altruism be your guide

What is altruism? Put simply, it's the wish that other people may be happy. And, says Matthieu Ricard, a happiness researcher and a Buddhist monk, altruism is also a great lens for making decisions, both for the short and long term, in work and in life.

18
4 reasons why talented women are shut out of tech

We’ve all heard about the gender gap in tech. Women simply aren’t thriving in one of the most promising fields in the United States — and not for lack of talent. And here’s the truth: It’s not solely a problem for women. It’s a problem for men, too. In just five years, there will be a million unfilled computer science–related jobs in the United States, which according to our calculations could amount to a $500 billion opportunity cost. Tech companies are producing jobs three times faster than the U.S. is producing computer scientists. There are incredible opportunities here. We need women to help fill these jobs, and we need them now.

19
JetBlue to start direct flights from New York City to Cuba in July

"I commend JetBlue CEO Robin Hayes for his leadership in making JetBlue the first major carrier to announce a direct flight from New York to Cuba in this new era between our nations," Governor Cuomo said in a statement on Tuesday.

20
The politics of fiction

Listening to stories widens the imagination; telling them lets us leap over cultural walls, embrace different experiences, feel what others feel. Elif Shafak builds on this simple idea to argue that fiction can overcome identity politics.

21
Safari is the new IE

Contribute to WebKit. The core of Safari is still, after all, an open-source project, so there’s no practical reason why anyone with the C++ chops couldn’t roll up their sleeves and implement the new APIs themselves. (The absurdity of giving free labor to the richest company on earth isn’t lost on me, but we’re talking desperate times here.) The major problem I see with this approach is that WebKit is not Safari, and Apple could still decide to not deploy WebKit features to their flagship browser. To circle back to IndexedDB again, it was fully implemented by Google well before the Blink fork, and for several years, Apple could have just flipped a bit in their build script to include Google’s implementation, but instead they decided to waffle for a few years and then replace it with their own broken version. There’s no guarantee they wouldn’t do the same thing for other outside contributions.

22
MIT Technology Review’s 50 Smartest Companies 2015, from Tesla to Uber | MIT Technology Review

Right here. This year, when the editors of MIT Technology Review began our annual search for the smartest companies, we did not have trouble finding big ideas. To make the list, a company must have truly innovative technology and a business model that is both practical and ambitious, with the result that it has set the agenda in its field over the past 12 months.

23
How a driverless car sees the road

Statistically, the least reliable part of the car is ... the driver. Chris Urmson heads up Google's driverless car program, one of several efforts to remove humans from the driver's seat. He talks about where his program is right now, and shares fascinating footage that shows how the car sees the road and makes autonomous decisions about what to do next.

24
Chevy rolls out tiny air conditioner for your hot smartphone - CNET

Chevy is introducing a personal air conditioner for your smartphone. It's a cold air vent that chills out your phone when it sits on a little tray below the dashboard. The idea is that keeping your phone cool improves performance and battery life compared with cooking it like a pancake on a griddle inside a hot car .

25
How do teens think about body image, beauty and bullying?

I have seen how the beauty is presented on TV/Movies/Commercials, etc and they give an image of a certain type, making it seem like this is what we suppose to look like and if you don’t look like that, you’re weird or ugly. That is so wrong. Also, the bullies are bullies because they are being bullied by their parents or others, so they take it out on whoever they think they can manipulate or beat. The Bible talks about true beauty and about bullies. Read my blog and you may understand more about life. God bless and thanks for reading my comments. Awesome blog by the way. :)

26
This is scientific proof that summer movies were better 30 years ago

There are times when the gauzy lens of nostalgia distorts how we think about movies, music, and TV shows of years past, tricking us into thinking they're better than they were — and then there are times when we're presented with cold, hard facts that things simply were better. Take, for example, the state of summer movies in 1985.

27
Windows 10: release date, price, news and features

Regardless of whether the "final" version of Windows 10 is available, Insiders must continue to receive preview updates – which will not stop after July 29 – for their copy of Windows to remain genuine. If you want to opt out of the preview, you'll likely have to restore back to your previous version of Windows 7 or 8.1 and perform a clean Windows 10 install from there.

28
The 10 Most-Pirated Movies

When you're done, please be sure to let us know what you think about the movies on our most-bootlegged film list. If you've seen these pictures (legally or otherwise) and think they're worth watching by any means possible, share your opinions in the comment section below. We'd love to hear them! If you have strong thoughts about piracy, on either side of the equation, let us know about that, too.

29
Facebook changed its logo yesterday, did you notice?

Facebook quietly changed its logo yesterday for the first time since 2005 and you probably didn’t even notice.

30
The original smartwatches: Casio's history of wild wrist designs

The Apple Watch has been out for over two months now, and other modern smartwatches well before that. It’s no longer the stuff of sci-fi to consider using your watch to play music, control your TV, or track your fitness. But these are all things that you’ve been able to do for a surprisingly long time — well, if you maybe lived in Japan in the ‘90s and didn’t mind carrying around a bunch of Casio watches, that is.

31
A powerful poem about what it feels like to be transgender

"I was the mystery of an anatomy, a question asked but not answered," says poet Lee Mokobe, a TED Fellow, in this gripping and poetic exploration of identity and transition. It's a thoughtful reflection on bodies, and the meanings poured into them.

32
7 Router Features You Should Be Using for Better Wi-Fi

Do Double Duty: Add External Storage The latest breed of routers can take the pain out of shared data storage, too. Current generation high-end models offer the ability to connect external storage directly to the router, with options for USB 2.0, 3.0, and SATA connections, depending upon the model. This allows a do-it-yourself network-attached storage setup. The data may be accessible via multiple paths in addition to network mapping, for example via a router-based FTP server, which can make folders on the drive available externally via the Web. In most cases, any USB storage device, from thumb drives to spinning hard drives, can be attached and made available as shared-storage devices. If it supports it, the drive could also work with DLNA for use as a media server for DLNA-capable devices on your network.

33
Technology and The Evolution of Storytelling

I’ve admired Walt Disney so much my whole life and part of it is because he entertained people like no other person in history has ever done. The way he makes you feel when you watch his movies, the way he makes you feel when go through that tunnel under the train station at Disneyland and you’re transported.

34
Raging Bull Markets: How Young Men’s Hormones Unsettle Finance

That’s one recommendation from research into the role of hormones in provoking risky behavior in financial decisions. Cortisol and testosterone, more prevalent in young men, lead traders to take risks and keep taking them once they’ve had success, leading to winning streaks and crashes, said Ed Roberts, a researcher at Imperial College London.

35
Data Scientists are Changing the Face of Business Intelligence

Humans are walking data centers and our interactions and behaviors, no matter how minuscule, are building a near infinite pool of aggregate data over the course of our lifetime.

36 Forbes Tech

Facebook © 2015

37
10 TED Talks for binge-watching

The ten women in this chorus have all been sentenced to life in prison. They share a moving song about their experiences — one that reveals their hopes, regrets and fears. "I'm not an angel," sings one, "but I'm not the devil." Filmed at an independent TEDx event inside Muncy State Prison, it's a rare and poignant look inside the world of people imprisoned with no hope of parole. (Note: The prison's Office of Victim Advocacy has ensured that victims were treated fairly and respectfully around this TEDx event.)

38
An IBM engineer quit to become an Instagram star — These 29 photos prove it was a good idea

An IBM engineer quit to become an Instagram star — These 29 photos prove it was a good idea

39
California just cracked down on parents who don't vaccinate their kids

In California, parents now have a clear choice: get your children vaccinated or brush up on your home-schooling skills. Today, California governor Jerry Brown  signed into law SB277 , a bill that eliminates personal and religious beliefs as exemptions for school vaccination requirements. That means parents in the state have very few excuses now for not getting their children vaccinated before sending them to school.

40
PicoBrew’s Zymatic Beer Making Machine Made A Brewer Out Of A Noob Like Me

In a conversation with PicoBrew’s VP of Marketing Donald Brewer (!!) we discussed how the Zymatic already plays a roll for some breweries to cheaply make new, experimental batches—sort of a tool for innovation and experimentation. Even more interesting to me is the opportunity for small brewers—who do not have national or even regional distribution of their beer—to possibly be able to sell the intellectual property of their recipes so that people who want their beer, can replicate it at home.

41
'Arkham Knight' is absolutely fun, but sometimes it forgets it's a Batman game

"Batman: Arkham Knight" is the grand finale to a trilogy of games that began with 2009's "Batman: Arkham Asylum" and 2011's "Batman: Arkham City." (There's also a 2013 prequel, "Batman: Arkham Origins" set in the same universe. It's referenced, but not terribly important). They're excellent games that really nail the feeling of being Batman, set in a world that's a pretty terrific mashup of the various ways the hero and his world have been depicted over the past 75 years. If you like Batman, chances are you will love the "Arkham" games. If you're new to the character, they're one of the best introductions to him outside of " Batman: The Animated Series ."

42
The amazing story of the man who gave us modern pain relief

For the longest time, doctors basically ignored the most basic and frustrating part of being sick — pain. In this lyrical, informative talk, Latif Nasser tells the extraordinary story of wrestler and doctor John J. Bonica, who persuaded the medical profession to take pain seriously — and transformed the lives of millions.

43
Here's how Apple Music compares to Spotify, Tidal, and others

But there are some key differences between them, and they could just change whether you'd like to choose one over the other. The biggest differentiator remains Spotify's free, ad-supported tier on desktop and mobile. It's something that no one else can match, and it makes Spotify the obvious starting place to go if you're thinking about trying out streaming music for the first time. Of course, Apple is hoping that its three month free trial can change that, especially since its service is built right into every new iPhone.

44
How to turn off Apple Music's auto-renewal before your free trial ends

Free trials are very nice — especially when they last three whole months. Sign up for Apple Music, and that's exactly the deal you'll get. If you start streaming from Apple's new $9.99/monthly service today, you'll be charged for a month's subscription on September 30th. That's pretty far away, and it's very easy to forget about renewal dates. Admit it: you probably paid for a month of HBO Now even if you didn't mean to.

45
Your life needs Fuzzberta the guinea pig

Wu began sharing pictures of Fuzzberta — who she says is "so cute she doesn't look real" — on Facebook. After a positive response on Facebook, she expanded the guinea pig's social presence to Instagram.

46
This Hellish Underground Fire Has Burned for 100 Years | WIRED

The best explanation is the fires, which started in 1916, are the result of coal mines that were improperly shut down. Twenty years ago, the earth opened and destroyed 250 houses in just two hours. Over time the flames have chewed through 41 million tons of the coal, worth billions of dollars. Today, some 70 fires are currently burning. People live amongst smoke and toxic fumes that constantly seep out of the earth, causing respiratory and skin problems. Haglund experienced the danger and discomfort while visiting Jharia and the surrounding region last year.

47
Meet the 'Spearfishing Huntress' who has lit the internet on fire in just 48 hours

Thomas hopes to use her social media presence to raise awareness about oceanic conservation. “[Spearfishers] have the front seat to see how the ocean is degrading, how the population of fish is going down so quickly, and how humans are having a massive negative impact on the ecology,” she told Buzzfeed .

48
There is no easy way to move your playlists from Spotify to Apple Music

Now that  Apple Music has been unleashed on the world , you may be interested in giving it a try. If you’ve been using Spotify like most streaming music users do, moving your playlists to Apple Music is no easy task. In fact… it’s pretty much impossible, at least automatically. That’s right, there’s no simple way to bring your playlists from Spotify or any other streaming service (outside of Apple-owned Beats Music) to Apple Music.

49
A T-Cell Immunotherapy Cure for Cancer | MIT Technology Review

The T-cell therapies are the most radical of several new approaches that recruit the immune system to attack cancers. An old idea that once looked like a dead end, immunotherapy has roared back with stunning results in the last four years. Newly marketed drugs called checkpoint inhibitors are curing a small percentage of skin and lung cancers, once hopeless cases. More than 60,000 people have been treated with these drugs, which are sold by Merck and Bristol-Myers Squibb. The treatments work by removing molecular brakes that normally keep the body’s T cells from seeing cancer as an enemy, and they have helped demonstrate that the immune system is capable of destroying cancer. Juno’s technology for engineering the DNA of T cells to guide their activity is at an earlier, more experimental stage. At the time of its IPO, Juno offered data on just 61 patients with leukemia or lymphoma.

50
I have too many unread articles saved for later... and that's okay

What I learned was that I was the best possible curator for myself. Over the past few years, I’ve saved a wide variety of brilliant articles, tutorials, stories, songs and videos to keep me engrossed for days. And when you have time on your hands and nowhere to go, there’s nothing quite like a deep treasure trove of great content to explore.

51 Acer rolls out a curved, super-wide display with AMD's gaming tech
52 The Incredible 3D Printed Zoetrope
53 Leica's Q camera is beautiful, expensive and totally worth it
54 Startups Serving The 99 Percent Will Be the Next Billion-Dollar Companies
55 PCMag on Twitter
56 11 crazy fruits that will take your taste buds around the world
57 Digital ads + content marketing = PulsePoint’s new direction
58 Reg Saddler on Twitter
59 22 things that happen on every episode of 'Love It or List It'
60 New ways to think about beauty
61 Apple Music offers smart musical suggestions with a human touch
62 We sent men to the moon in 1969 on a tiny fraction of the data that's in the average laptop
63 A Drone Flew Inside A Fireworks Show And Captured Spectacular Video Of The Explosions Up Close
64 Broadband Speeds Are Improving in Many Places. Too Bad It Took Google to Make It Happen. | MIT Technology Review
65 Facebook Messenger payments are now available to everyone in the US
66 12 Things You Can Replace With a $38 Tablet
67 Taxi drivers threaten to strike over Uber in midst of Toronto Pan Am Games
68 This Spotify playlist is keeping track of (almost) all the music on Beats 1
69 How an Airbnb renter's horror story taught the company's CEO his greatest leadership lesson
70 This Week On The TC Gadgets Podcast: Lexus Hoverboard, Anki, And Bowling Central
71 joac on Twitter
72 Lil Wayne unleashes 'Free Weezy Album' for Fourth of July weekend
73 Looking past limits
74 10 Tricks for a Perfect Summer Cookout in Three Minutes
75 AdMobilize unveils its newest real-world analytics so advertisers can ‘pay-per-face’
76 Mark Zuckerberg says we'll be able to send emotions to each other soon
77 As pride soars, Apple adds LGBT featured section to the App Store - CNET
78 A closer look at Apple Music: feature-packed, but a bit disjointed
79 Sources: YC Alums Club Together For Crystal Towers, A $100M VC Fund For Promising YC Startups
80 Reddit boss apologises after staff sacking causes 'revolt'
81 Vicious graphics cards and cutting-edge CPUs: June's most powerful PC hardware reveals
82 The time America put its national treasures on a cross-country train
83 The physics of floating screwdrivers
84 Snap, Crackle, R.I.P.: New Bubble Wrap Won't Burst
85 CrunchWeek: Apple Music, Uber’s Engineering Push, And Shyp’s Challenge To The 1099 Economy
86 A visit to Grado's Brooklyn headphone factory - CNET
87 Is the seat-back movie about to die out?