Top Videos
The Youths Are Totally Confused by Game Boys [VIDEO]

The kids have spoken and Game Boys just don't make sense anymore in the age of Wii.

Next Bitcoin Core Version to Include 'Smarter' Transaction Fees

Gavin Andresen outlined the new floating transaction fees for bitcoin in a new Bitcoin Foundation blog post.

Pley works like Netflix for Lego lovers - CNET

Kids can test out Lego sets without the commitment of buying full collections. Pley co-founder Elina Furman tells Crave why parents and brick fanatics will love their rent-to-test format.

EHR Jobs - Start your mobile iPad EMR career - drchrono

drchrono is a rapidly growing company. Our expansion continues at a breakneck speed and we need great people like you! Our team has been the cornerstone of our success. A passion for the product unites and motivates us. You belong here if you feel it too. You can help enrich the experience of our users and push forward the product in fresh and innovative ways. You will be asked to harness your talents and accomplish things you've never done before. You will make an impact.

GitLab | Open source software to collaborate on code

GitLab offers git repository management, code reviews, issue tracking, activity feeds and wikis. Enterprises install GitLab on-premise and connect it with LDAP and Active Directory servers for secure authentication and authorization. A single GitLab server can handle more than 25,000 users but it is also possible to create a high availability setup with multiple active servers.

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Top News
1
New Zealand ISP allows its customers to subscribe to the U.S. version of Netflix

Netflix and other media services tend to block visitors from markets they’re not operating in due to licensing restrictions, and Netflix in particular serves up different content even in its active markets, giving users in Canada access to other titles than users in the U.K. Internet users from outside of the United States have for some time circumvented these kinds of restrictions through paid VPN services, but this may be the first time that an internet provider is offering this kind of circumvention as part of its regular service.

2
Potato Salad

POTATO MADNESS: Receive a potato-salad themed haiku written by me, your name carved into a potato that will be used in the potato salad, a signed jar of mayonnaise, the potato salad recipe, hang out in the kitchen with me while I make the potato salad, choose a potato-salad-appropriate ingredient to add to the potato salad, receive a bite of the potato salad, a photo of me making the potato salad, a 'thank you' posted to our website and I will say your name out loud while making the potato salad.

3
Costco removing D’Souza’s ‘America’ from shelves

In January, Obama paid a visit to a Costco store in a Washington, D.C., suburb, “proving,” as Jaime Fuller of the Washington Post commented, “that his administration’s romance with the second-largest retailer in America is stronger than ever – and might just be the most successful union of a politician and a supermarket in American history.”

4
Couple's Daring Tornado Wedding Pics Will Blow You Away

A couple in Saskatchewan, Canada, had an unexpected guest photobomb their wedding pictures when a tornado touched down near their reception venue. Instead of fretting about overcast skies, the couple and photographer, Colleen Niska, used the natural disaster as a stellar backdrop.

5
How to Completely Delete Facebook From Your Life

For those ready to call it quits, you're in for a surprise — it's more difficult than you think to erase yourself permanently. With its ever-changing privacy policies, becoming Facebook-free requires more steps than just hitting the delete button and saying goodbye.

6
Hollywood is helping the military build its Iron Man suit

The Journal reports that suit developers expect TALOS to weigh as much as 400 pounds, adding to the problem. The Pentagon itself believes that a whole 365 pounds of that might need to be batteries simply to power all of the systems that the military wants the suit to have. For now, there remains no good way to power it — an area that Tony Stark has quite a lead on. $10 million has reportedly been spent on the project so far, with no cap to its budget. The military has previously said that it would like to deploy the suit as soon as 2018.

7
Taylor Swift: Forming a bond with fans in the future will mean constantly providing them with the element of surprise.

I can relate to these thoughts myself , but never been able to organize them in such a great way. Great article. Taylor being such a successful person, I have to agree with her. I was ten when I bought my first album " The Beatles", now at 60 I buy Taylor's albums. The Beatles would be considered by most today as Pop Music instead of Rock Music. The media equipment and media source has a lot to do, with weather I buy a CD or download the CD or just purchase a song. I did the Napster thing just to try it out a few times, but felt guilty and paid and burned my own CD's. If there's at least 3 songs that I really like I buy the CD. With a album I discover that the way the music flows from one song to another makes a album more enjoyable and I discover that there are other songs on it I being to like the more I hear them that I would not have discovered otherwise. Now, with iPhone APP's it's easier to find music I like. Like Skype , iHeart Radio, iTunes's, etc. I am not genre specific and these APP have brought music to my ears that local station which are genre specific would not have.

8
The 12 Most Self-Destructive Things You Can Do on Facebook

If you're an active Facebooker, you may be engaging in self-destructive behavior without even realizing it. By identifying what causes these negative feelings, you can battle this virtual self-harm to stay happy and have a better social network experience.

9
Should Humanity Try to Contact Intelligent Aliens?

Active SETI sounds like science fiction, but some astronomers are discussing it seriously today. The idea is, as it has been in the past, a controversial, hot-button issue, with some researchers wary of sending signals out to touch base with intelligent aliens .

10
13 Fantastic Castles to Visit in America

History: Bannerman Castle was built in 1901 by Frank Bannerman, a Scottish immigrant who settled with his family in Brooklyn, where he began producing arms. One son, David Bannerman, spotted the island while canoeing and the family bought it and constructed a mock Scottish castle to use as an arsenal -- not the most inviting use of a castle. That was the first of many developments that made the island dangerous. A fire in 1969 left the castle in ruins, and the building continues to be damaged by storms. There are several tour options on Bannerman Castle's website, but visiting is not for the faint of heart. The official Historic Hudson River Towns website plainly warns: "Do not attempt to visit Bannerman Island. At this point it is a very treacherous combination of buried hazards and dangerous wall conditions."

11
7-Year-Old Raises More Than $49,000 to Fund Friend's Surgery

We all know how the saying ends. That's exactly why 7-year-old Quinn Callender of Maple Ridge, British Columbia, made lemonade when he found out that his friend Brayden Grozdanich, who has cerebral palsy, needed an expensive surgery to help him walk.

12
Drive-Thru Health Care: How McDonald's Inspired An Urgent Care Gold Rush

The key is that the 10,000 urgent care clinics across the country, handling 160 million visits annually, are an appealing medical model wrapped up in a proven consumer-driven business plan. Put simply, urgent care is the first retail health play. The burgeoning $16 billion industry depends on location, customer service and brand, just like a restaurant or grocer. Because nobody plans to be sick, clinics aren’t squirreled away in an office park or medical building. They are placed in highly visible, highly trafficked locations minutes from patients’ work and home, off a busy highway or next to a Wal-Mart. No appointment necessary–stop by 12 hours a day, including weekends. Walk in with the flu, with a broken bone or sprain, with a cut that needs stitches. See a doctor on average within 20 minutes, get an X-ray or prescription, and get back to your life–all at perhaps 20% of the cost of an ER visit.

13
The 8 Most Annoying Things Your Phone Does in Summer

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 34 million unique visitors worldwide and 15 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

14
Tour de France Selfies Are a New Danger to Cyclists

Cyclists are traveling at high speeds along the route, and people in the road pose a clear danger. Fans of the Tour de France have a history of getting in the way along the race's more than 2,200-mile route, but selfie takers are upping the ante by turning their backs to oncoming cyclists.

15
Remote-controlled chip could be the future of contraceptives - CNET

A tiny chip implanted under a woman's skin can deliver hormonal birth control for up to 16 years and is entering pre-clinical trials next year.

16
Ubuntu and open source help the City of Munich save millions

Munich is the third-largest city in Germany, with approximately 1.5 million inhabitants. The local governing body employs more than 33,000 people – 16,000 of whom use PCs as part of their daily roles. Those computers are located at different sites and their users have widely differing needs. In 2001, there were 22 organisational units, each of which controlled its own IT resources. Client software versions, patch management, shared directories and user permission policies varied across the organisation.

17
Survey: Job Skills Matter More Than Degrees

Rusty Rueff, Glassdoor career and workplace expert, said employers still value  education  as one piece of the puzzle for a successful career, but there has been a shift. Now, most employees say gaining the latest skills relevant to the job and industry will more effectively advance their careers. Employees feel that's what employers truly want, to really help move business forward, he said.

18
This is Why Your Earbuds Are Always Tangled [COMIC]

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 34 million unique visitors worldwide and 15 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

19
Python is now the most popular introductory teaching language at top U.S. universities

I considered the top 39 departments, as ranked by U.S. News in 2014 . (This link may become outdated as U.S. News issues new rankings.) Why did I stop at 39? Because there was an 8-way tie for 40, so the differentiating signal is weak by that point. No ranking scheme is perfect, and rankings change over time. In particular, this ranking considers only American Ph.D.-granting universities. And my cut-off of 39 excludes many universities that I respect, including my own. We could debate endlessly about which schools to include, and how to rank them. But I had to choose some ranking scheme and cut-off, and this felt reasonable.

20
The Next Big Programming Language You’ve Never Heard Of | Enterprise | WIRED

The result is a programming language that just might defy the odds. Nine years after that night in Seattle, a $200-million startup has used D to build its entire online operation, and thanks to Alexandrescu, one of biggest names on the internet is now exploring the new language as well. Today, Alexandrescu is a research scientist at Facebook, where he and a team of coders are using D to refashion small parts of the company’s massive operation. Bright, too, has collaborated with Facebook on this experimental software, as an outsider contractor. The tech giant isn’t an official sponsor of the language—something Alexandrescu is quick to tell you—but Facebook believes in D enough to keep him working on it full-time, and the company is at least considering the possibility of using D in lieu of C++, the venerable language that drives the systems at the heart of so many leading web services.

21
'Academically Adrift' @insidehighered

AAC&U programs have in the past stressed the value of academic rigor and also of engagement of students outside the classroom. Humphreys said that she agreed with the book that some activities students enjoy may not add to their learning. But she said it was important not to view all engagement activities in the same way. It is important, she said, "not to lump together activities such as being in a fraternity or just hanging out with friends" with activities such as extracurricular activities that may in fact be quite educational and important, even if not linked to a specific course.

22
Taylor Swift: Forming a bond with fans in the future will mean constantly providing them with the element of surprise.

There are always going to be those artists who break through on an emotional level and end up in people's lives forever. The way I see it, fans view music the way they view their relationships. Some music is just for fun, a passing fling (the ones they dance to at clubs and parties for a month while the song is a huge radio hit, that they will soon forget they ever danced to). Some songs and albums represent seasons of our lives, like relationships that we hold dear in our memories but had their time and place in the past.

23
Popcorn Time's "Netflix for Torrents" Is Coming to Chromecast

Popcorn Time is a miracle: It lets you stream torrents of movies and TV shows as though they were on Netflix or Hulu. Is it illegal? Probably! But it's also awesome, hard to trace, and soon, it'll work with your Chromecast.

24
Ferrari F12 Berlinetta review - CNET

OK, that's slightly hyperbolic, but the engine compartment here is a truly stunning thing to behold. I opened the hood for many a curious onlooker and not a one could retain their glee. Of course, it helps that the rest of the car looks great. Angular in places, curvaceous in others, it's a nod to many of the best parts of the 599 GTB, yet a clean step forward at the same time. The most dramatic piece is the so-called Aero Bridge, a gaping cut-out in the fenders that channels air from the hood to the sides of the car, filling the turbulent void created by the front wheels. Tweaks like this give the car significantly more downforce than the GTB, yet lower aerodynamic drag.

25
Your Country's 'Game of Thrones' Sigil if the World Cup Was in Westeros

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 34 million unique visitors worldwide and 15 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

26
Ancient bird had wingspan longer than a stretch limousine

Fossils unearthed at a construction project in South Carolina belong to a bird with the largest wingspan ever known, according to a new study. The animal measured 6.4 meters from wingtip to wingtip, about the length of a 10-passenger limousine and approaching twice the size of the wandering albatross, today’s wingspan record-holder. Like modern-day albatrosses, the newly described species would have been a soaring champ.

27
Tomorrow Daily 013: Climate-controlled cities, muscle-powered robots, potato salad, and more - CNET

On today's Tomorrow Daily, Rich and Ashley check out tiny muscle-powered robots, Hyundai's newest viral video, and Dubai Holding's plan for a climate-controlled city. Also, the original potato salad Kickstarter, and your best (and worst!) fireworks photos.

28
Tour de France and the selfie

But whatever the motive, most selfies require you to turn your back on the subject and in this case that can cause an issue. It is best to stay safely to one side out of the way, and if you can practise the selfie before the riders arrive, that way, you'll get the shot without risking yours or anyone else's safety. Let's face it, a shot of you grinning with a few riders in the background is not worth getting hurt for.

29
Brain's Consciousness 'Sleep Switch' Found By Accident?

Scientists believe they may have accidentally found the key in the human brain that, when turned or tweaked the right way, seems to switch our consciousness on and off.

30
'Star Wars' Galactic Empire invades a German airport - CNET

This fan-made fake set leak shows what it might look like if the Galactic Empire had a hub at Germany's Frankfurt airport.

31
Android-powered Nokia Lumia phone rumored - CNET

Microsoft purchased Nokia's handset business in April for about $7.2 billion, in an effort to gain more market share for its Windows Phone mobile operating system and to catch up in the cell phone business against Samsung Electronics and Apple. Nokia, which remains in business as a networking company, was already Microsoft's closest partner in smartphones prior to the acquisition and was one of the biggest backers of the Windows Phone operating system.

32
Ex-Facebook Data Scientist: Every Facebook User Is Part Of An Experiment At Some Point

Andrew Ledvina used to be a data scientist at Facebook . He recently made the mistake of talking to a reporter about that, notably telling a WSJ reporter that when he was there from 2012 to 2014, there was no internal review board that might have had qualms about Facebook’s now infamous emotion manipulation study, that he and other data scientists were allowed to run any test they wanted as long as it didn’t annoy users, and that people working there get “desensitized” to the number of people included in their experiments as it’s such a tiny percentage of Facebook’s overall user base. Ledvina, like many a person quoted in the media, didn’t like the way the reporter presented his words and so took to his blog to defend himself, Facebook, and the Facebook study — but I think he simply dug a deeper hole for the company that he quit this April. He facetiously titled the blog, “ 10 Ways Facebook Is Actually The Devil ,” to needle those who see the study as evil, and then went on to confirm the WSJ’s report and shed new light on how Facebook’s data science team views users.

33
The Most Annoying Problem in Computing

Whichever new, futuristic battery makes it to market first, it seems certain that help is on the way. More likely than not, Google's Project Volta and similar software-based projects will simply be stopgap measures until the hardware revolution arrives in a year or two, once battery makers have had time to get their products tested, manufactured, and approved by regulators and safety inspectors. The iPhone 6 probably won't have a vastly longer battery life than the iPhone 5S, but the iPhone 7 and 8 almost certainly will. (As physicist Fred Schlachter puts it , " Significant improvement in battery capacity can only be made by changing to a different chemistry. ") And cheaper, better batteries may help more than just smartphones – as a 2012 McKinsey publication pointed out, next-generation technology is coming to car batteries, too, with the price of automotive battery kits expected to fall by more than 50 percent by the year 2020.

34
A Simple Blood Test Could Predict the Onset of Alzheimer's

The team of scientists analyzed 26 proteins known to be associated with cognitive decline in blood from 1,148 people, including 476 people with Alzheimer's. They found that 10 of these proteins could predict if individuals with "mild cognitive impairment" would go on to develop Alzheimer's within a year with an accuracy of 90 percent.

35
Data Breach Bulletin: Brazilian Banks Lose $3.75 Billion Because Of Boleto Malware

Brazilian Bolware – World Cup-related cybersecurity concerns in Brazil have been well-documented, but cybercrime is also the cause of 95% of losses for Brazilian banks. Last week, RSA uncovered a fraud campaign with a potential loss of US$3.75 billion through the country’s most popular payment mechanism – the Boleto Bancario. Similar to a money order payment in the United States, a Boleto is a financial document that allows a customer to pay an exact amount to a merchant. Anyone with a bank account can issue an offline or online Boleto, and more than 6 billion Boletos were issued last year. The RSA Research Group analyzed 17 versions of the malware with data between March and June 2014, after the Boleto malware first appeared near the end of 2012. Bolware operations, the fraud ring that uses the Boleto malware, has conducted 495,793 potentially fraudulent transactions affecting more than 30 banks in Brazil and infecting more than 192,000 victim PCs, according to the RSA report .  Additionally, 83,506 email credentials were stolen using the malware. While Bolware operations appears to only be targeting Brazilian banks, this report is a reminder of how costly cybercrime can be.

36
GE's Made a Microwave That Can Measure the Calories on Your Plate

Health and fitness monitoring is helping us all look after ourselves a little better, but there's one stumbling block: calorie intake is still self-reported, making it laborious and often inaccurate. GE, however, thinks it has a way to change that.

37
Kickstarter stuffed with food projects thanks to potato-salad success - CNET

Cesal is all for the explosion of entertaining food projects that have poured onto Kickstarter. "I think it makes a nice change from the technology items or wallets that are common on there," he says. He launched his project after the potato-salad project had only reached $340. Now that potato salad has gone funding-bonkers, he would love if some of that success filtered down to his pancakes. "I would not mind if this grew enough to be a small business where I deliver custom pancakes, kind of like an edible greeting card," he says. So far, he's $9 towards a $25 goal with 13 days left.

38
This Man Shouldn't Be the Next U.S. Patent Office Director

What we need is someone who understands the problems with patent law, especially when it comes to software patents. Some are pointing to the fact that David Kappos, the previous director of the Patent Office, was from the tech industry, so the next one has to come from pharma or biotech. This push does a great job of highlighting the fact that one single patent system shouldn't apply to technologies as different as pharmaceuticals and software. In any event, the nominee to head the Patent Office shouldn't be the face of opposition to patent reform that was championed by the White House, passed by a majority of the House, and supported by a considerable proportion of Senators.

39
How the Internet is Democratizing Luxury

However, for those in doubt of France’s startup culture, I have witnessed first-hand how the luxury industry is being disrupted and broken down – and it’s the French startups that are doing it. Last week I spent two days at the  Hackers On The Runway  conference in Paris, organised by French technology accelerator  TheFamily , which recently raised $1 million from investors such as Index Ventures and is perhaps one of the only tech accelerators in the world that has such a panache for doing things with soul.

40
We Answer Your Burning Questions About the Return of Sailor Moon | Underwire | WIRED

The version on Hulu will be subtitled, at least initially. Toei Animation also plans to redub the original series, due in part to the seething fan hatred of the original dub. As I’ve mentioned, it was pretty bad, not only changing all the character names to make them Western (e.g., Usagi became Serena, Mamoru became Darien) but adding some extremely unfortunate slang to Sailor Moon’s speech. (Actual dialogue: “Luna, you’re trippin’ when it comes to knowing what’s on a girl’s mind!”)

41
Apple's iPhone 5s holds top spot in most popular smartphone in Q1, iPhone 4S still in the fight

According to the report, which was released on July 7, Apple has a firm grasp on the top spot for the world’s most popular smartphone in the first quarter of 2014. Of course, as you can see by the chart above, it’s a fight that Samsung is aiming to make one-sided with their laundry list of devices, which includes two variants of the Galaxy S 4.

42
Self-Serve Beer Stations Designed for All-Stars

Anyone headed to Minnesota's Target Field for next week's MLB All-Star festivities can expect a hoppy new addition for the rest of the season: two self-serve beer stations.

43
Buzzfeed Is Officially A Case Study In Media Industry Disruption

I've been covering the business of news, information and entertainment in one form or another for more than 10 years. In February 2014, I moved to San Francisco to cover the tech beat. My primary focus is social media and digital media, but I'm interested in other aspects, including but not limited to the sharing economy, lifehacking, fitness & sports tech and the evolving culture of the Bay Area. In past incarnations I've worked at AOL, Conde Nast Portfolio, Radar and WWD. Circle me on Google+ , follow me on Twitter or send me tips or ideas at jbercovici@forbes.com.

44
Playing Video Games Can Actually Change the Size of Your Brain

The infographic below, compiled and created by Liberty Games, compiles information from several scientific studies on the positive effects of video games. So if you want to validate all those hours on Friday night spent playing Call of Duty , you're welcome.

45
Don't call it laser tag: this is a real-life version of 'Left 4 Dead'

The way these events will play out should be pretty familiar if you've hopped into an online shooter recently: rescue a science team working on a cure for the zombie outbreak and drop the antigen in the city's water supply before the other team does, while capture the flag and hard-point control are among orders of the day for the Fallujah mission. Winners can expect a room stocked with booze, "hot babes" (apparently someone hasn't gotten the message yet) and as-of-yet unnamed VIPs, just for them. Each game is expected to last an hour, with the total experience, meaning gearing up and debriefing, pegged at three hours for each. Keeping with the video-game theme, the outfit is planning for 64-player rounds and stats like accuracy, kill-to-death ratio and how many secrets you've discovered in your game will all be tracked. If this sounds like something your usual squad would be up for, buy-in starts at $90 and group packages are available too.

46
Larry Page's Plan For People Whose Jobs Are Replaced By Tech: Work Less

Rather than asking the world to simply change man’s fundamental nature, the only practical approach is to seek structural changes that don’t depend on altruism. For example, better ways to address the problem of increased unemployment from increased productivity of capital due to technological innovation would be to campaign towards negative income tax policies as proposed by Milton Friedman( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negative_income_tax ), or expanding the already existing Earned Income Tax Credit program, and a corresponding reduction in other existing social programs. Thus basic monetary needs are covered with minimal government overhead in administration, and the incentive to work for more lavish lifestyles continues to remain intact and with minimal burden.

47
Trouble with the curve: What you need to know about curved TVs - CNET

After a month living with a curved TV at home, and more time in the lab comparing it to flat TVs, I've learned a few things. Here's the short version.

48
The Ultra-Simple App That Lets Anyone Encrypt Anything | Threat Level | WIRED

In fact, miniLock uses a flavor of encryption that had barely been developed when PGP became popular in the 1990s: elliptic curve cryptography. Kobeissi says that crypto toolset allows for tricks that haven’t been possible before; PGP’s public keys, which users have to share with anyone who wants to send them encrypted files, often fill close to a page with random text. MiniLock IDs are only 44 characters, small enough that they can fit in a tweet with room to spare. And elliptic curve crypto makes possible miniLock’s feature of deriving the user’s keys from his or her passphrase every time it’s entered rather than storing them. Kobeissi says he’s saving the full technical explanation of miniLock’s elliptic curve feats for his HOPE conference talk .

49
You're Probably Making These Five Mistakes At Work

Taking an active role in your advancement at work is important. But when you focus only on your personal success or recognition, you’re making your work about individual goals rather than goals that are good for the overall group. Think of it this way: Your boss’s boss isn’t interested in your personal gain--he’s worried about what’s best for the company. If your actions appear to benefit the overall health of the company, you’ll be integral to helping them achieve their bottom line, which in turn will make them more likely to want to keep you on and promote you.

50
Future contraceptives will let women remote-control their fertility

Contraceptive implants are nothing new, but the current generation of progestogen-releasing devices need to be replaced every three years and have to be removed if you want to try for a baby. That may change soon, however, now that the Gates Foundation is backing a Massachusetts biotech company to build the next generation of implantable devices. MicroCHIPS Inc. is building a wirelessly controlled implant that slowly pumps out drugs and could, theoretically, only need replacing once every 16 years. MicroCHIPS has been testing the "intelligent drug delivery system" with osteoporosis patients who would otherwise require a daily barrage of injections. Bill-and-Melinda Gates and MIT's Robert Langer, however, believe that the technology could solve the family planning crisis that exists in the world's poorest countries. Reservoirs of levonogestrel , a contraceptive hormone would be kept inside the 1.5cm device, and could be activated and deactivated at the whims of the user with some sort of wireless device. Currently in the experimentation stage, the team hope to solve the issue of security -- to prevent anyone but the user controlling the system -- before submitting it for FDA approval at some point in the near future.

51 Feel old by watching kids not know what a Game Boy is
52 In The NSA Archive: 800 Pages Of Doomed Lovers' Emails, Facebook Messages
53 World's longest film releases 72-minute teaser - CNET
54 4 Reasons Why Being Selfish Is Good for You
55 Merck Uses Legal Threats To Stifle Negative Advice About Zetia And Vytorin In Italy
56 THE SNAPCHAT REPORT: Audience Numbers, Demographics, And Brands' Early Marketing Efforts
57 LokLok: An Instant Messaging App for Your Lock-Screen
58 The secretive billionaire who built Silicon Valley
59 Dream Employers For Liberal Arts Students
60 Can This “Neuroscience Based” Music App Really Boost Your Brain Power By 400%? | Science Blogs | WIRED
61 Of Course A GoPro Is The Best Way To Capture The Sickening POV Of Riding The World's Tallest Waterslide
62 Former Facebook data scientist confirms: If you use Facebook, you've been experimented on
63 Resurgent BlackBerry Leaps On New Health Care Push
64 iPhone 6 Front Panel Subjected to Scratch Test, Significant Bending
65 Nielsen's Mid-Year Report Reveals Demise Of The Digital Download
66 How Working on Multiple Screens Can Actually Help You Focus | Gadget Lab | WIRED
67 How to Install Wifi on a 737
68 SAPVoice: Data Innovators In Sports And Entertainment: Postano
69 The Bluetooth Shower Speaker: Shower Yourself In High-Quality Sound | Cult of Mac Deals
70 Why Has Amazon Risked Distraction By Releasing The Fire Smartphone?
71 Apple bolsters iOS 8 Health app with on-device steps counting & caffeine tracking
72 5 Psychological Tactics Marketers Use To Influence Consumer Behavior
73 How to Disappear (almost) Completely: living off the grid
74 With Sapphire, Apple Takes A Stab At Making The iPhone 6 Hard To Kill
75 Cyberpunk Half-Life 2 mod, NeoTokyo, now available on Steam for free
76 TV Setup Guide: 14 tips for getting the best picture quality out of your TV
77 How I Built a Physical Product and Mobile Game Without Code
78 Meet the 12 Startups At JFDI Asia's Demo Day
79 Mark Zuckerberg: Connecting everyone is one of the fundamental challenges of our generation.
80 Raju the Elephant Cries After Being Rescued From Captivity
81 Road Trip Pic of the Day, 7/7/14: What is this? - CNET
82 Android Wear Is Here, and It’s Ready to Rule Your Wrist | Gadget Lab | WIRED
83 Sensory overload: Tokyo's Robot Restaurant - CNET
84 Scout by Telenav review - CNET
85 Ignoring Charges Of Conflict Of Interest, Mexico's Senate Passes Anti-Monopoly Law Against Billionaire Slim's Telecom Empire
86 Taylor Swift doesn't understand supply and demand
87 A tiny research team at Tableau is building tomorrow's UX for data
88 Android Wear Bug Is Preventing Users From Installing Paid Apps
89 These Aren’t Flowers. They’re Sculptures as Thin as a Hair | Design | WIRED
90 Facebook: Here's Why We Deleted Cheerleader's Hunting Pics
91 Watsi is hiring a full-stack developer
92 WIRED Summer Binge-Watching Guide: Community | Underwire | WIRED
93 Sorry, folks: Study says musical talent mostly comes from your genes
94 Discarded Japanese Gadget Factories Are Becoming High-Tech Greenhouses
95 Sensory overload: Japan's Robot Restaurant (pictures) - CNET