Top News
1
Kenya to Bar Travelers From Ebola-Hit Countries, Liberia Fears Ebola Spread After Clinic Raided

Following the government's announcement Saturday, Kenya Airways said it would suspend flights to Liberia and Sierra Leone. Kenya Airways, a major transport provider in Africa, has wrestled with the decision whether to continue flying to West Africa during the Ebola outbreak. Its suspension of flights is an abrupt reversal of its announcement Friday that it would continue flying.

2
The Galaxy Alpha is proof that Samsung is terrified of iPhone 6

Premium pricing for a phone with middling specs, but oodles of style. Hear that? That’s the penny dropping. Samsung has released its first true iPhone. If you’ve been vocal about hating Apple’s style over substance approach in the past, then the Galaxy Alpha is the enemy within. It’s specifically designed to appeal to people who’d normally buy an iPhone, in the most lazy, cowardly way possible. Yes, Samsung has been accused of copying Apple before, so it’s hardly a shock, but this should be the phone which makes even the most ardent Apple haters sit down and keep quiet. Buy it, and you’ll be an iSheep by proxy.

3
Dear Mom On The iPhone: You're Doing Fine

I'm not going to judge you. I don't know you. I don't know your story. But I do know that you don't need to watch every hop, skip, jump, twirl, swing, bite, song, dance, blink or breath to be a good mom. There's a lot that demands our attention in this parenting life -- and a lot that we want to soak in and enjoy. There's also a lot that happens in our lives outside of parenting that we cannot neglect. While parenting might be our most important and rewarding job, it's not the only one. We're all working on balance and finding that area where we can be satisfied that we're making enough time for it all. For the record, we're all failing at that. Every single one of us wishes we were better at juggling our responsibilities... and many of us spend time beating ourselves up for how we're doing. You're doing fine. As long as you're doing your best to make it all work for your family, you're doing just fine, and that's what matters.

4
MIT Invents A Shapeshifting Display You Can Reach Through And Touch

"Ten years ago, we had people at Media Lab working on gestural interactions, and now they're everywhere, from the Microsoft Kinect to the Nintendo Wiimote," says Follmer. "Whatever it ends up looking like, the UI of the future won't be made of just pixels, but time and form as well. And that future is only five or ten years away. It's time for designers to start thinking about what that means now."

5
I Liked Everything I Saw on Facebook for Two Days. Here’s What It Did to Me | Gadget Lab | WIRED

That first night, a small little circle with a dog’s head popped up in the corner of my phone. A chat head, from Facebook’s Messenger software! The dog turned out to be my old WIRED editor, John Bradley. “Have you been hacked,” he wanted to know. The next morning, my friend Helena sent me a message. “My fb feed is literally full of articles you like, it’s kind of funny,” she says. “No friend stuff, just Honan likes.” I replied with a thumbs up. This continued throughout the experiment. When I posted a status update to Facebook just saying “I like you,” I heard from numerous people that my weirdo activity had been overrunning their feeds. “My newsfeed is 70 percent things Mat has liked,” noted my pal Heather. Eventually, I would hear from someone who worked at Facebook, who had noticed my activity and wanted to connect me with the company’s PR department.

6
Johnny Cash Has Been Everywhere (Man)!

Johnny Cash Has Been EVERYWHERE (Man)!

7
The Lethality of Loneliness

At a deeper level, though, loneliness research forces us to acknowledge our own extraordinary malleability in the face of social forces. This susceptibility is both terrifying and exhilarating. On the terrifying side is the unhappy fact that isolation, especially when it stems from the disenfranchisement of the underprivileged, creates a bodily limitation all too easily reproduced in each successive generation. Given that we have been scaling back the kinds of programs that could help people overcome such disadvantages and that many in Congress, mostly Republicans, have been trying to defund exactly the kind of behavioral science research that could yield even better programs, we have reason to be afraid. But there’s something awe-inspiring about our resilience, too. Put an orphan in foster care, and his brain will repair its missing connections. Teach a lonely person to respond to others without fear and paranoia, and over time, her body will make fewer stress hormones and get less sick from them. Care for a pet or start believing in a supernatural being and your score on the UCLA Loneliness Scale will go down.

8
New super-fast USB cables won't mind which way you plug them in

The reversible USB Type-C standard has now been finalized , which should save the world untold man-hours in mis-plugging. Roughly the size of a current micro-USB Type-B connector, it uses matching rows of contacts on the top and bottom so that you can shove it in either way around. Type-C is a version of the 10Gbps USB 3.1 standard (twice as fast as USB 3.0), but slimmed down for compact and mobile devices. It'll also support the USB Power Delivery spec to carry up to 100 watts, easily enough to power a laptop. Unfortunately, the new connector isn't compatible with the current USB standard, except via converters. While there are no devices with USB 3.1 yet, it'll likely be standardized on most future laptops and mobile devices -- unlike its pricey rival, Thunderbolt .

9
When Patients Read What Their Doctors Write

Delbanco tells me that he considers OpenNotes to be "like a new medication." Just like any new treatment, it will come with unexpected side effects. In the meantime, patients and doctors don't need to wait for the formal OpenNotes program to come to town. Patients can ask their doctors directly to look at their records. Doctors can try sharing them with patients, in real time, as I do now. It's changed my practice, and fundamentally transformed my understanding of whom the medical record ultimately belongs to: the patient.

10
Scientists Have Simulated Time Travel With Photons | IFLScience

In a quantum regime, the authors say, the paradox of time travel can be resolved, leaving closed timelike curves consistent with relativity. Near a black hole, for example, the extreme effects of general relativity play a role.

11
Y Combinator And Mithril Invest In Helion, A Nuclear Fusion Startup | TechCrunch

According to Mithril’s Royan, the partnership between Mithril and Y Combinator is intended to help Helion become a company that can survive difficulties that arise over the years to come. Mithril, which contributed “well over $1 million” to Helion’s Series A, “looks to invest in durable companies.” In my conversations with Kirtly, Altman, and Royan, each emphasized how important being part of the current YC batch is for instilling a culture that can make significant progress while being prepared to solve problems that emerge along the way.

12
Harvard scientists devise robot swarm that can work together.

Harvard University scientists have developed about a thousand tiny robots that, like swarming bees or army ants, can work together in vast numbers without a guiding central intelligence. Photo: Michael Rubenstein, Harvard University.

13
For his latest novel, @paulocoelho focused on infidelity—and chose a title that pairs well with a hashtag

"Adultery" reflects the author's zeal for social media. For starters, he likes the one-word title because it goes well with a hashtag. Though in the past he has turned to fans for research, the latest work marks a new level of reader involvement. In November, Mr. Coelho asked fans who had been depressed to share their stories. "Anonymity is granted, but I may use your text without quoting you. This is the condition," he wrote on his blog. In one day, he received more than 1,000 emails. Instead of tales of clinical depression, he says, readers described affairs that torpedoed meaningful relationships.

14
Yep, Activision Is Bringing Back Sierra (And Kings Quest!) | TechCrunch

If the options, then, were “let Sierra’s old games fade away forever,” “spend a ton of money to hire a bunch of new developers/artists to try to recreate something that resembles Sierra in its glory days,” or “let carefully selected indie developers with proven track records take a stab at making these old series great again,” I’m glad they went with Door No. 3.

15
Kevin Rose Steps Into Part-Time Role At Google Ventures To Build A New Startup Called North | TechCrunch

In fact, Maris characterized the move as a win-win for all. After all, while Rose is advising portfolio companies for Google Ventures, he will also be facing many of the same struggles that they see in building their products. And, the idea of part-time VC and entrepreneur isn’t exactly a new one: Greylock’s Reid Hoffman, True Ventures’ Tony Conrad, and Khosla Ventures’ Keith Rabois have all shown that being a successful investor-operator can be done.

16
Turn Any YouTube Video Into A GIF By Just Adding “GIF” To The URL | TechCrunch

Want to turn something on YouTube into a GIF, but don’t want to futz with downloading third-party apps or digging around for an online converter?

17
59 Free Twitter Tools and Apps for Marketers

At Buffer, we tend to come across a fair share of  social media tools . We’ve collected a great bunch to share with you! Here are all the tools we’ve found helpful and many more that we’re excited to try. If there’s a free Twitter tool out there, you’re likely to find a mention here in our list.

18
10 Things You Didn't Know You Could Do With Your iPhone

chock-full of useful apps and games, it's also packed with a bunch of hidden features that can make life with your smartphone a whole lot easier.

19
'TurboRoo' puppy gets wheels thanks to 3D printing - CNET

In Indianapolis, the technology has once again come to the rescue -- this time to help a puppy named "TurboRoo" who was born without his front legs. "A breeder ended up dropping TurboRoo off at a veterinarian's office last month, where the employees there fell head-over-heels for the little puppy," reports 3Dprint.com . "One of the technicians, Ashely Looper ended up adopting TurboRoo permanently. They had tried their best to create a cart for the puppy, with the help of others, in order to aid in his walking, but the cart that they came up with just wasn't quite up to par."

20
The best fitness tracker you can buy

This is what makes the Jawbone Up24 most special. Not only does it do everything it ought to, like tracking steps and sleep, it actually turns that data into something useful. My favorite feature might be the vibrating alarm clock, which wakes you up at the perfect point in your sleep cycle. There’s also the "Today I Will" feature, which asks you to buy in on one good-health change that day: get in bed by 10:30, or bump up your step count by 25 percent. No other device does such a good job combining sleep, activity, and diet (the Up app makes food-tracking really easy) into small bits of actionable information designed to get you in better shape.

21
The TheTechNewsBlog Daily

The TheTechNewsBlog Daily, by TheTechNewsBlog: updated automatically with a curated selection of articles, blog posts, videos and photos.

22
Swarm of 1,000 Kilobots cooperates like an ant colony - CNET

Licenced for manufacture by a partner in 2011, the robots have demonstrated themselves capable of forming two-dimensional shapes: a sea-star, the letter K (for Kilobots), a wrench -- much like marching bands or a flock of birds. Lead author Michael Rubinstein of Harvard SEAS and the Wyss Institute likened their behaviour to ants that link together to form bridges and rafts for difficult terrain, or social amoebas that link together that can form a single body that can escape an environment where food is scarce.

23
Siri’s Inventors Are Building a Radical New AI That Does Anything You Ask | Enterprise | WIRED

When Apple announced the iPhone 4S on October 4, 2011, the headlines were not about its speedy A5 chip or improved camera. Instead they focused on an unusual new feature: an intelligent assistant, dubbed Siri. At first Siri, endowed with a female voice, seemed almost human in the way she understood what you said to her and responded, an advance in artificial intelligence that seemed to place us on a fast track to the Singularity. She was brilliant at fulfilling certain requests, like “Can you set the alarm for 6:30?” or “Call Diane’s mobile phone.” And she had a personality: If you asked her if there was a God, she would demur with deft wisdom. “My policy is the separation of spirit and silicon,” she’d say.

24
Is the Internet Too Absurd for 'The Onion'?

ClickHole is just getting warmed up, though, and The Onion plans to cast its gimlet eye on other facets of web culture, like YouTube, that have so far remained unskewered. "It starts off as kind of a clickbait parody. I think that's kind of the way into it," Affonso said. "The digital media thing is how we start, but it has to be a broader Internet parody in order for it to work."

25
The best Ice Bucket Challenge videos from the rich and famous

Once a person completes the challenge, they're also supposed to dare several other people — usually three — to participate, which is why the challenge has been growing and growing. We've collected a ton of our favorite Ice Bucket Challenges for you to watch right here.

26
Email Is Still the Best Thing on the Internet

Email was one's passport and identity.   Before Facebook became a true alternative for verifying one's identity on the web, the email address was how one accomplished serious things on the Internet. Want to verify a bank account? Email. Amazon? Email. Forums? Email. Even Facebook in the early days? Email. And it meant something where your email address was hosted. FirstName@YourLastName.com signaled you owned a domain. A Hotmail account might indicate you were a beginner and a Well address connoted early Internet connectivity. For a time, Gmail addresses were a sign of sophistication. Now, both the functional and symbolic importance of email addresses is in decline. There are so many more ways to signal who we are online now.

27
9 TED Talks with fascinating psych experiments

Human behavior is a riddle. In these talks, speakers share psychological studies—from asking kids to wait to eat marshmallows to planting false memories through a single word—that offer possible solutions as well as surprising new twists.

28
Apple CEO Tim Cook Is 'Not Satisfied' With Employee Diversity

“Apple is committed to transparency, which is why we are publishing statistics about the race and gender makeup of our company. Let me say up front: As CEO, I’m not satisfied with the numbers on this page. They’re not new to us, and we’ve been working hard for quite some time to improve them,” said Cook on the diversity report website. “We are making progress, and we’re committed to being as innovative in advancing diversity as we are in developing our products.”

29
How To Write a LinkedIn Recommendation

LinkedIn LinkedIn has a lot of great features, but overall the site suffers from a fairly mechanical feeling. There isn’t a lot of human warmth on LinkedIn, notwithstanding the fact that LinkedIn has over 300 million users. That’s why I draw colorful pictures with markers and colored pencils.   The more personality you can bring to your LinkedIn presence and your profile, in my book, the better!

30
YC-Backed VizeraLabs Projects New Materials Onto Any Surface | TechCrunch

At stores with Y Combinator-backed VizeraLabs’s projector installed, you can instantly see what every fabric looks like on a display model. The company wants to replace the books full of different fabrics you can look through at furniture retailers with a projector paired with Microsoft’s Kinect hardware and pretty much any device that can connect to its growing database of materials and patterns in the cloud:

31
Yahoo Acquires Ad Startup ClarityRay | TechCrunch

We’ve been working on building up security capabilities and making Yahoo a safer place for users and partners. Advertising is an essential part of our business here at Yahoo, and we’re committed to getting it right. ClarityRay is a company with deep expertise in ad-malware detection and prevention. The bottom line for Yahoo is that search is going to get better and safer for users, and advertising will become more reliable and profitable for partners.

32
The habits of happiness

What is happiness, and how can we all get some? Biochemist turned Buddhist monk Matthieu Ricard says we can train our minds in habits of well-being, to generate a true sense of serenity and fulfillment.

33
Apple considers using harder sapphire screens in pricier new iPhones $AAPL

Apple Inc. created the blueprint for a smartphone when it covered the touch screen of its first iPhone in glass instead of plastic. Now, it is betting $700 million that sapphire, a harder and more expensive material, can replace glass and better protect future devices.

34
The death of the original jumbo jet, Boeing's 747-400

Later this month, Cathay Pacific's 747 will fly from San Francisco to Hong Kong for the very last time. It's a story we're hearing from nearly every airline still flying the most recognizable passenger jet in aviation history -- rising fuel costs are prompting carriers to ground their fleets, opting to shuttle passengers in more modern (and efficient) airliners instead. Hundreds of 747s still take to the skies every day, but their numbers are dwindling, with Boeing's 777-300ER and 787 Dreamliner , as well as the enormous Airbus A380 , picking up the slack. The flagships of yesteryear now litter the desert, with several sites in California serving as a permanent resting place for the plane that was once known as the Queen of the Skies, the Boeing 747-400. Gallery | 25 Photos Where 747s go to die (Victorville, CA) + See all 25

35
What US state has the fastest Internet speed? Virginia - CNET

Akamai's report also looks at Internet speeds around the world. The country with the fastest service is South Korea with an average of 23.6 Mbps. In second place, and far behind South Korea, is Japan with an average of 14.6 Mbps. How does the US rank overall worldwide? It's No. 10 with an average of 10.5 Mbps.

36
Chrome’s Safe Browsing Tool Now Also Protects You From Downloading Deceptive Software | TechCrunch

Over the years, Google has added all kinds of security features into Chrome through its Safe Browsing service. It can warn you when you are surfing to a site that it deems unsafe, like malware and phishing sites, but also when you are about to download software from known malware sites. Starting today , Google is expanding this program to include downloads of “deceptive software,” that is programs that pretend to be helpful but actually make changes to your operating system or browser.

37
Disney Conquers Physics, Uses 3D Printing To Create Impossible Spinning Tops | TechCrunch

Have you ever been sitting around bored and found yourself trying to get some random household object — a battery, a pen, whatever — to spin around like a top?

38
No Rest For The Innovators | TechCrunch

And finally, not all systems are global, cloud native environments with nicely tamed and reliable RESTful APIs. In fact most are not. And they need love, too. Massive call centers, actuarial risk data, government regulations and compliance, customer data, payroll, GL, HR, business analytics and company big data are key ingredients. They may get there in time, but much work remains to be done by software to make businesses become as agile and adaptive as they need to be. There is as yet no “app” for that.

39
Killer User Onboarding Starts With A Story

So, long before you begin to weigh your interface options (“should I go with an intro video or a series of tooltips?”), let’s make sure you’re super clear on what your users are trying to get away from, where they want you to take them, and all the twists and turns in the road from one to the other.

40
The Work-From-Home Kryptonite No One Can Resist [COMIC]

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 34 million unique visitors worldwide and 15 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

41
Behold, the fish cannon

Salmon are amazing fish. They’ll swim hundreds of miles against the current, hurl themselves up waterfalls, and risk being eaten by bears as they return to their birthplace to spawn. But some obstacles are too much, and that’s where Whooshh Innovations comes in. Behold, the salmon cannon. Seriously, watch this video of fish getting launched out of pneumatic tubes:

42
Meet Gavin Andresen, the Most Powerful Person in the World of Bitcoin | MIT Technology Review

The risk of security flaws is a constant worry for Andresen. He laughs when he recounts how in 2010 someone tipped off Nakamoto about a bug that made it possible to spend anyone else’s bitcoins. “Satoshi just changed the code and told everybody, ‘Run this new code, I’m not going to tell you why,’” Andresen says. But although most bugs that turn up in the software today are minor, similar problems could still lurk. “It’s why I say Bitcoin is an experiment and you shouldn’t invest your life’s savings,” he says. Unfortunately, the best defense against security flaws—having people review other people’s code—is hard to deploy for Bitcoin. Unpaid volunteers prefer to write their own code rather than laboriously read other people’s. Andresen sees the recent Heartbleed bug that broke the security of hundreds of thousands of websites as a cautionary tale. It was caused by a single, unnoticed mistake by a volunteer contributor to a piece of open source software. Even design flaws that fall short of enabling easy thefts could seriously wound Bitcoin. The currency’s value is built almost entirely on speculation, so any indication that the system is less than bulletproof can cause a major price shock.

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44
Om/One levitating Bluetooth speaker defies gravity - CNET

The Om/One consists of a base and a round speaker that levitates above it, spinning gently, thanks to a magnetic base. You can grab the sphere and take it with you as a portable speaker or let it hang out above the stand and play audio. It also includes a microphone so it can be used to conduct phone conversations as well. The battery life of the final version is expected to be up to 15 hours, which would be impressive even without the magnetic levitation trick.

45
Middle Schoolers Learn About Startups By Launching Their Own | TechCrunch

Upon its release, Flappy Bird became one of the most popular game on the Internet. It is a simple one-button game in which you have to navigate the bird arbitrarily generated in a variety of colors past the Super Mario-esque green pipe obstacles. You do this by clicking your mouse repeatedly. Each time you click, the bird flies up. Don't make it fly too high or it will die. This means you have to tap …

46
Startup Demonstrates Ultra-efficient Stacked Solar Cells | MIT Technology Review

With economies of scale, however, such cells could improve the economics of solar power. At a scale of 80 to 100 megawatts a year of manufacturing capacity, a cell with 50 percent efficiency would make it possible to reach costs of less than five cents per kilowatt-hour, Burroughs says. The U.S. Energy Information Administration estimates that new natural-gas power plants will produce electricity at 6.4 cents per kilowatt-hour.

47
200+ Job Openings in Digital Marketing, Video, Ads and More

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 34 million unique visitors worldwide and 15 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

48
18 Easy DIY Projects That Are Cute as a Button

is a leading source for news, information and resources for the Connected Generation. Mashable reports on the importance of digital innovation and how it empowers and inspires people around the world. Mashable's record 34 million unique visitors worldwide and 15 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities. Founded in 2005, Mashable is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.

49 Sam Lessin Is Leaving Facebook | TechCrunch

Facebook VP of product management Sam Lessin just announced he’s leaving the social network. The announcement came as a post on Lessin’s personal Facebook page saying, “Esteemed colleagues, it is with quite mixed emotions that I write to say that August 29th will be my last day at Facebook.”

50
Powerbeats2 Review: Wireless Running Earbuds That Should Keep You On Pace | TechCrunch

I’ve previously been an outspoken fan of the Jaybird line of wireless fitness earbuds, but the Powerbeats2 definitely give them a run for their money. Jaybird still offers its excellent BlueBuds 2 for $169.95, which is $30 cheaper than the $199.95 the Powerbeats2 will cost you on the Apple Store. And the Jaybird option promises up to two more hours of battery life in continuous use, though some have complained about the Jaybird set’s ability to resist sweat and stay in-ear. Still, the Beats option definitely won’t disappoint runners looking for something to keep them motivated without encumbering their runs with messy cables.

51 How Verizon lets its copper network decay to force phone customers onto fiber
52 14 Books That Change When You Reread Them Later in Life
53 Uber To Test Moving Services In Atlanta, Nashville | TechCrunch
54 Stunning Photos Of Europeans Who Have Abandoned Civilization To Live Off The Land
55 The 7 Best Secret Product Hunt Lists
56 Twitter Cofounder and Missouri Native Jack Dorsey Marches With Ferguson Protesters
57 How Do You Compete With EMC, IBM and Oracle? Generis' Secret: Get Close To Customers
58 Kevin Rose Steps Into Part-Time Role At Google Ventures To Build A New Startup Called North | TechCrunch
59 Justice Department Orders Second Autopsy of Michael Brown, Missouri Gov. Criticizes Ferguson PD
60 Great-great-grandma from New York City sets record at Gay Games 9
61 7 TED Talks that will make you love science
62 Stop Writing Dystopian Sci-Fi—It’s Making Us All Fear Technology | Opinion | WIRED
63 Common Pitfalls in Technology Naming
64 Five specialty videogame stores where you can play vintage games on original consoles
65 Quick Purchases, Sleek Brands, No Social: How New App Spring Looks To Crack Mobile Shopping
66 Heads-Up Display Navdy Hits $1M In Pre-Orders During First Week | TechCrunch
67 Sony’s New ‘Album Of The Day’ App Offers Deep Discounts To Fight The Shift To Streaming | TechCrunch
68 Which Apps Are Eating Your Battery? Normal Will Tell You. | TechCrunch
69 Meet MonsterMind, the NSA Bot That Could Wage Cyberwar Autonomously | Threat Level | WIRED
70 WIRED Space Photo of the Day for August 2014 | Science | WIRED
71 5.5-inch iPhone 6 could cost $800 based on new projections
72 The Economics of Police Militarism - The New Yorker
73 Gamescom 2014: Sony's Biggest PlayStation Reveals - IGN
74 12 New York City Easter Eggs You'd Otherwise Blink and Miss
75 German Startup Says Its New Chip Halves Bitcoin Mining Energy
76 Emerging Solid State Storage And Higher Endurance Flash
77 8 Famous Photographers Worth Following on Instagram
78 California hotel hires robot butlers to provide room service (video)
79 New USB spec brings faster data speeds and reversible plugs, but you'll need new adapters
80 Amazon Basics vs. Monoprice: Which HDMI cable to buy? - CNET
81 Uber Is About To Launch An API | TechCrunch
82 NSA BIOS Backdoor a.k.a. God Mode Malware Part 1: DEITYBOUNCE - InfoSec Institute
83 Do Software Engineers Get Enough Respect? | TechCrunch
84 6 of the Greatest Game Demos Ever - IGN
85 Florida man accused of murder asked Siri where to hide body
86 You Don't Need a Co-Founder For Your Startup
87 How to continue Chatting in Facebook app without installing Facebook Messenger
88 A Q&A With SmartThings CEO Alex Hawkinson After Selling To Samsung For $200M | TechCrunch
89 Peel Delivers A DISH And DirectTV Smart Remote For iOS – No New Hardware Required | TechCrunch
90 Why 30 is not the new 20
91 7 Roommate Red Flags to Look Out For
92 What To Do When You Don’t Have UX Unicorn Money
93 Banks vie for a piece of Africa's mobile banking market
94 How To Make Your First Million Dollars - Yo, Hailo And Others Explain
95 Choice, happiness and spaghetti sauce
96 NVIDIA Shield tablet review: a solid slate with a gaming addiction
97 A Photo App That Teaches You to Be More Perceptive | Design | WIRED
98 Content Analysis App For Pretentiousness: Use The Latin-O-Meter To Test Yourself
99 Game of Thrones: George R.R. Martin Says Some Fans Have Correctly Guessed the End - IGN
100 Google Buys Jetpac To Give Context To Visual Searches | TechCrunch