Top Videos
Fotokite Phi is a GoPro-carrying quadcopter on a leash - CNET

Want to shoot photos and video from the sky, but don't want to worry about controllers, apps and regulations? This tethered quadcopter looks like the answer.

Daniel Radcliffe goes goth (and goofy) in 'Victor Frankenstein'

The twist of this adaptation: It's actually told from the perspective of a hunchback-free Igor, played by Daniel Radcliffe.

Google’s new project could convince you to buy solar panels

Google wants to make it easy for people to consider using solar power for their homes. Today it launched a tool called Project Sunroof, which uses Google M

A farmer built his own 4G mast to fix rural broadband issues

Living in rural England, Richard Guy was a man with a problem. Like many located in similar areas, his "broadband" internet connection was pretty narrow,

Trevor Noah's first 'Daily Show' promo touts an ass for the masses

Comedy Central debuts the first promo for the Jon Stewart-free 'Daily Show.'

Scientists stimulate mouse brains with wireless 'charger'

For reasons we'll soon explain, turning on a light inside a mouse's head can help scientists map brain function. It's easy to implant an LED in a mouse's

Not a vibrator or a tea machine? Bedroom tech sucks

I don't want a smart mattress. I'm happy with my dumb mattress. And I really don't feel the need to graph my sex life.

NASA’s Logo From The ’70s Was Ridiculously Cool

Everybody do the worm.

http://www.instructables.com/id/intel/

Introducing the Intel® Internet of Things hub which brings you the best IoT Instructables. Participate in our upcoming Intel IoT InvitationalLearn Mor...

Jon Stewart's first hosting gig after The Daily Show is WWE SummerSlam

Jon Stewart will be the celebrity guest host of WWE's annual SummerSlam event, which is happening this Sunday at Brooklyn's Barclays Center. USA Today was first to report the appearance, which will...

'Woman' in Mars rover pic is not quite as she appears - CNET

What looks like a mysterious figure in a Mars photo gets the Internet excited; CNET's Eric Mack asks NASA what the space agency makes of it all.

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Top News
1
Airbnb Teams With Sequoia, China Broadband to Woo Chinese Users

The partners will help Airbnb “navigate the China market and create a truly localized presence for the company,” the startup said Tuesday in a statement. Chesky said he is scheduling trips to China in September and October. The company plans to expand in the country as it vies with domestic competitors.

2
The "Female Viagra" Is Coming: The Story Of How It Almost Never Happened

Boehringer Ingelheim wasn’t the first drugmaker to bow out of the potentially lucrative quest for a female libido drug. Others, including Viagra’s maker Pfizer, Procter and Gamble, and BioSante Pharmaceuticals, have tried and failed. They all quickly learned that when it comes to sexual dysfunction, a pharmaceutical fix was much easier in a man than a woman. Viagra and other drugs like it are taken before sex and increase physical blood flow to the penis (of the 26 FDA-approved male impotence treatments, many are variations of the same one). The so-called "female Viagra" isn’t anything similar at all: It must be taken every day and messes with complicated systems of brain chemistry. And the very premise that women should turn to a drug to alter their desire, which is naturally prone to fluctuate in life, has drawn critics' ire.

3
iPhone 6S Release Date Revealed In Triple Leak

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4
The Tesla Of The Future Could Look A Lot Like Uber

Jonas, who is known for taking provocative, forward-looking stances on the auto industry, predicted in April that self-driving fleets of electric vehicles will eventually replace individual car ownership. In a chart embedded in a memo to clients, he described what he said will be a shift from fossil-fueled, human-driven, privately owned cars to electric, self-driving armadas owned by ride-hailing services like Uber or Lyft.

5
Google enters the Wi-Fi router market with the very different OnHub

And in an era where reports of router vulnerabilities are becoming as common as weather updates, the OnHub is outfitted with a Trusted Platform Module—a component more typically found on computers marketed to the enterprise. Finally, the OnHub also has a speaker with a 3-amp onboard amplifier and a dimmable LED light ring, but Google hasn’t revealed much about what these components do.

6
Product Hunt Takes AMAs A Step Further With The Launch Of LIVE

Product Hunt , the online community where members upvote products, games and books they like, is helping that community get more of a heads up on “Ask Me Anything” (AMA) events today with the introduction of LIVE – a scheduled AMA with different product makers, founders, celebrities, authors and others.

7
UberEats Food Delivery Comes to San Francisco

The service is part of Uber’s fledgling effort to use its network of more than 200,000 drivers to expand into new types of on-demand services. The company now offers its UberEats food delivery service in six cities and has experimented with delivering everything from designer suits in New York City to toothpaste in Washington D.C.

8
Team USA launches Kickstarter to fund its giant robot duel with Japan

If the funding and the duel are successful though, MegaBots has a "five year plan" to develop an international tournament that they promise will blend the "technology of Formula 1 with the fights of UFC." They say they've already been approached by a team from South Korea and are confident that once they've got robot that can "punch a Prius hanging from a crane" there will be more interest from investors. So far there have only been talks, no solid deals, but they're open to offers. "If Jay Z gave us 50 million dollars to be like 'I'm gonna be the pilot’ we’d take the money," says Oehrlein. "Jay Z fighting in a giant robot: what's more American than that?"

9
This Twitter Account Will Teach You Words You Didn't Know You Needed

You know when you open a bag of Doritos and so much of it is air? What a chiptease. How about when you keep typing "teh" instead of "the" no matter what you do? You're so unkeyboardinated today. Feel like sipping a beer on your patio? Yeah, we like a good utepils , too. How conceivable is it that people really use these words? Pretty nearfetched, if you ask us.

10
Key things to consider before you switch to Windows 10

"Windows 10 is built around a unity model to allow sharing of apps, settings, and status between desktops, laptops, and Windows 10 mobile phones. While this takes a simple queue from the Apple playbook, there are some cautions around these new features businesses may not be ready for. Windows 10 does an exceptional job interfacing with Xbox One, Cortana, and other Windows devices. Businesses need to consider that users may take their Windows 10 device home and interact with any of these home and verbal usability assistants.

11
Next month Comcast will turn off the Xbox 360 app Netflix hated

It's unclear what improvements are on the way, and so far, Comcast has not followed up with an app for Xbox One (or PlayStation, or other set-top boxes for that matter) to replace it. Comcast never added live TV to the app, so it was mostly just a faster way to get video on-demand, something the cable giant may prefer to do with its X1 platform, especially since it's starting to add games too . Whatever the plan is, the lights are turning out in just a couple of weeks.

12
What CIOs can learn about security threats from 4 recent hacks

The media and the public are finally waking up to the fact that almost all organizations are at risk of getting hacked. Analyzing a few recent high-profile breaches might just help you prevent the same thing from happening at your company.

13
Is Apple losing its enterprise tablet edge?

Still, it isn’t a surprise that Android and Windows tablets are quickly growing in market share, because many of these devices come better-suited for full computing needs. For example, Android tablets can be used with a mouse in addition to a Bluetooth keyboard, whereas Apple’s devices can be used with a keyboard, but not a mouse. And similarly, Windows devices like the Surface 3 and Surface 3 Pro come equipped with full Windows 8.1 or 10, as well as keyboards and trackpads.

14
The key to self-assembling electronics could be... soap

Molecular electronics involves building up components like transistors, resistors, solar cells and LED displays by getting molecules to self-organise into the correct structures. It's not an easy task, but a team at the University of Copenhagen has come up with a breakthrough. It involves soap.

15
FTC names its $25,000 counter-robocall contest winner

Despite being banned by the Federal Trade Commission, prerecorded robocalls are still a common hassle for Americans. That could soon change now that the FTC has announced the winner of its $25,000 Robocalls: Humanity Strikes Back contest. The winning team of Ethan Garr and Bryan Moyles developed a mobile app called Robokiller that works a lot like your email's spam folder.

16
New earbuds give you super-hearing

The Dash, a biometric headphone system from Bragi , works as three kinds of devices in one. First, it's a set of Bluetooth earbuds for streaming music wirelessly from a smartphone. Second, the earbuds have 4GB of storage and can play music loaded into their memory chips for listening without a phone. Finally, the earbuds function as a "quantified self" fitness tracking system for measuring heart rate, oxygen saturation and energy spent, as well as running pace and distance.

17
Verizon Edges AT&T in Network Quality, While Sprint Makes Improvements

Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure, for example, said at Code Conference that his company would be the No. 1 or No. 2 network within two years’ time — a bold claim for a company that has been a distant fourth in recent years. AT&T and Verizon rely on the strength of their networks to justify prices that in most cases are higher than those offered by Sprint and T-Mobile. T-Mobile, meanwhile, has been boasting that its LTE network offers city dwellers fast speeds on an less-congested network.

18
The Verge on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

19
IGN on Twitter

20
Google is bringing its Android One program for affordable phones to Africa

Today the company is launching its first Android One device for the region with the help of Infinix, one of the “fastest growing smartphone brands in Africa.” The Infinix Hot 2 is available in Nigeria starting today for a price of N17,500 (around 88 USD). It will arrive in Ghana, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Egypt and Morocco as well over the coming weeks, reaching a combined 379 million people.

21
Why We’re Jealous of Chinese Smartphones

Why in the world would anyone be "jealous" of Chinese "smartphones"? They're all based on ripoff Android software which is highly porous and subject to hacking, far more than Apple's iOS (confirmed by Edward Snowden), plus their amazing technology is all based on stolen IP. No such phones can ever be sold in the US.

22
How to syndicate your content

Most republished pieces will include a link back to the original content. While this is as it should be, few readers click those links in my experience. What happens more often is readers click on relevant inline links to get more information. If these happen to be links to other content on your blog (it should go without saying, but don’t do this unless it’s actually relevant), you can increase visits to your blog this way.

23
Fotokite Phi Is A $349 Drone On A Leash That Needs No Pilot, Just A GoPro

I’ve crashed most of the drones I’ve tried to fly, but the Fotokite Phi was easy to keep aloft. You just pull its folded body out of the tube, turn it on, and give your wrist a quick twist. That gesture starts the propellers, and you simply let it go. Once it’s flying nearby, you can give the leash more slack to get a wider field of vision for its camera. I ran around an indoor office dragging the Fotokite through the air without crashing.

24
Uber Serves Up Its Food Delivery Service, UberEats, To San Francisco

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25
BuzzFeed expands further into Asia with Yahoo Japan

Unlike BuzzFeed’s other international launches where it’s maintained complete ownership of its operations — such as Brazil, the UK, France, Australia, India, Germany, Mexico and Canada — this will be a joint venture with Yahoo Japan that will harness the latter’s expertise in localizing content.

26
Xbox One to Windows 10 game streaming is about to look a lot better

Starting today, users with strong home networks can activate "very high" quality streaming under the 'game streaming' section of the app's 'settings' menu. The update crams in a bunch of other handy features too, including the ability to right-click users on your friends list to send them a message, new notification preferences, the ability to compare achievements, a new grid view for the My Games section and the ability to add PC games to your game list via a drop down menu. Check out the full list of changes at the source link below.

27
Activate GodMode in Windows 10 - CNET

If you're sick of switching between the Settings menu and the Control Panel, searching for your lost settings, there is a way to access all settings and controls in one place: GodMode.

28
7 ways to protect your privacy on the internet

Blocking third party cookies on your browser is another good way to maintain some anonymity while online. Blocking cookies makes it so websites will have a harder time tracking the last time you visited, what your username is, and whether or not you should be signed in automatically. While blocking cookies can be less convenient in some cases, the increase in privacy is worth the tradeoff.

29
NASA's LADEE confirms the moon's atmosphere has neon

NMS has thus proven that the lunar exosphere is composed mostly of helium, argon and neon. Their main source is solar winds, and they fluctuate over time, as well as exhibit peak times throughout the day. LADEE's data shows, however, that some of the gases in the exosphere come from the moon itself: The decay of radioactive potassium-40 found in lunar rocks gives rise to argon, while thorium and uranium produce helium.

30
This is the scariest chart in the history of cable TV

But perhaps most troubling is the firm's contention that the demand for "skinny bundles" — slimmed-down cable packages — appears low, with Sling TV, Dish Network's "over-the-top" offering, adding fewer than 70,000 subscribers in the quarter, according to Pacific Crest's estimates.

31
Meerkat says users are more engaged than ever, but data suggests lackluster growth

Meerkat’s new engagement stat, shared onstage  by Rubin at VentureBeat’s  GrowthBeat event, offers only a little insight into the app’s popularity. While the number of people coming back to create content on Meerkat is “constantly increasing,” according to Rubin, Meerkat’s engagement lift doesn’t necessarily suggest that the number of people who use the app regularly is growing. It could mean a small number of engaged users are just putting in more time.

32
Tesla starts testing its autopilot features with Model S drivers

As promised, Tesla's latest autopilot features are out in the wild. A handful of Model S drivers are now testing the electric car's upcoming semi-autonomous tech, including highway autosteer (which tackles lanes, passing and vehicle distance) and automatic parallel parking. Ideally, these vehicular pioneers will find the last remaining quirks in both the autopilot's behavior and its interface -- those edge cases that tend to creep up only in the real world.

33
Technology has created more jobs than it has destroyed, says 140 years of data

Their conclusion is unremittingly cheerful: rather than destroying jobs, technology has been a “great job-creating machine”. Findings by Deloitte such as a fourfold rise in bar staff since the 1950s or a surge in the number of hairdressers this century suggest to the authors that technology has increased spending power, therefore creating new demand and new jobs.

34
German carriers have reportedly revealed when Apple will release the iPhone 6S

Many are expecting the next iPhone to launch in two sizes just like the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus. The iPhone 6S is also said to come with a new screen that has Apple's Force Touch technology built-in, a better 12-megapixel camera, and a faster processor.

35
TechCrunch

The space game is hot and only the strongest are going to survive. One Canadian company feels like its in a good spot to succeed, having just been awarded the patent for a “space elevator.” Back to the how’s and what’s in a second…the company, Thoth Technology, took an aggressive shot at Elon Musk’s SpaceX in the process of announcing the news by way of its… Read More

36
Ashley Madison

Ashley Madison is the most famous name in infidelity and married dating. As seen on Hannity, Howard Stern, TIME, BusinessWeek, Sports Illustrated, Maxim, USA Today. Ashley Madison is the most recognized and reputable married dating company. Our Married Dating Services for Married individuals Work. Ashley Madison is the most successful website for finding an affair and cheating partners. Have an Affair today on Ashley Madison. Thousands of cheating wives and cheating husbands signup everyday looking for an affair. We are the most famous website for discreet encounters between married individuals. Married Dating has never been easier. With Our affair guarantee package we guarantee you will find the perfect affair partner. Sign up for Free today.

37
How autism freed me to be myself

“People are so afraid of variety that they try to fit everything into a tiny little box with a specific label,” says 16-year-old Rosie King, who is bold, brash and autistic. She wants to know: Why is everyone so worried about being normal? She sounds a clarion call for every kid, parent, teacher and person to celebrate uniqueness. It’s a soaring testament to the potential of human diversity.

38 MIT Technology Review

English (US)

39
The small and surprisingly dangerous detail the police track about you

A very unsexy-sounding piece of technology could mean that the police know where you go, with whom, and when: the automatic license plate reader. These cameras are innocuously placed all across small-town America to catch known criminals, but as lawyer and TED Fellow Catherine Crump shows, the data they collect in aggregate could have disastrous consequences for everyone the world over.

40
Street art with a message of hope and peace

What does this gorgeous street art say? It's Arabic poetry, inspired by bold graffiti and placed where a message of hope and peace can do the most good. In this quietly passionate talk, artist and TED Fellow eL Seed describes his ambition: to create art so beautiful it needs no translation.

41
The 10 Most-Pirated Movies

The great thing about TorrentFreak's most-pirated movie list is that it gives us insight into the flicks that are popular among people who don't want to open their wallets to pay for a movie ticket. Take Furious 7 , for instance. Furious 7 's been a major player in the pirated movie space since its April release, making it one of the most-popular stolen movies of the year—and it still grossed more than $1.5 billion dollars worldwide. Does this mean that the Vin Diesel vehicle would've grossed significantly more dollars if there were less bootlegging? Who knows. Pirating's impact is hard to gauge, in that regard, and you can find people passionately arguing both sides of the issue.

42
Bring on the learning revolution!

In this poignant, funny follow-up to his fabled 2006 talk, Sir Ken Robinson makes the case for a radical shift from standardized schools to personalized learning — creating conditions where kids' natural talents can flourish.

43
The world's most boring television ... and why it's hilariously addictive

You've heard about slow food. Now here's slow ... TV? In this very funny talk, Norwegian television producer Thomas Hellum shares how he and his team began to broadcast long, boring events, often live — and found a rapt audience. Shows include a 7-hour train journey, an 18-hour fishing expedition and a 5.5-day ferry voyage along the coast of Norway. The results are both beautiful and fascinating. Really.

44
OnePlus 2 review

Part of being a flagship smartphone in 2015 is having a killer camera — both the iPhone 6 and Galaxy S6 have incredible cameras that put other phones to shame. The OnePlus 2 has a good camera on paper: it’s a 13-megapixel sensor behind a six-element f/2.0 lens with optical image stabilization and laser-assisted autofocus. In good lighting, it can take really great photos, even providing a shallow depth of field effect in close ups. In poor lighting, however, it doesn’t quite match the iPhone 6 or Galaxy S6, with dimmer images and less detail. It’s also a bit slow: there’s a noticeable lag between tapping the shutter button and the image being captured, which made it really difficult to get pictures of my seven-month-old before she moved out of frame. For every sharp picture I have of her, I have half a dozen blurry attempts. OnePlus’ founder Carl Pei has boasted that software updates are coming that will make the OnePlus 2’s camera "the best on the market," so hopefully the lag is something that will be addressed.

45
As work gets more complex, 6 rules to simplify

Why do people feel so miserable and disengaged at work? Because today's businesses are increasingly and dizzyingly complex — and traditional pillars of management are obsolete, says Yves Morieux. So, he says, it falls to individual employees to navigate the rabbit's warren of interdependencies. In this energetic talk, Morieux offers six rules for "smart simplicity." (Rule One: Understand what your colleagues actually do.)

46
U.S. Smartphone Use in 2015

The traditional notion of “going online” often evokes images of a desktop or laptop computer with a full complement of features, such as a large screen, mouse, keyboard, wires, and a dedicated high-speed connection. But for many Americans, the reality of the online experience is substantially different. Today nearly two-thirds of Americans own a smartphone, and 19% of Americans rely to some degree on a smartphone for accessing online services and information and for staying connected to the world around them — either because they lack broadband at home, or because they have few options for online access other than their cell phone.

47
Ultimate Frisbee’s Surprising Arrival as a Likely Olympic Sport - The New Yorker

The World Flying Disc Federation, with sixty-two member associations on five continents, has been pushing discs towards the Olympic stage for about five years, with Ultimate out front. The I.O.C. loved a few things about the sport, to which it granted provisional recognition in 2013: the spirit of the game, gender equity, global growth, youth appeal, and, most of all, how fun it is to watch . The sport’s leaders believe it has come this far, and will eventually be included in the Olympic games, because it’s a better spectator sport—more easily understood and more telegenic—than plenty of “traditional” Olympic sports. (Apologies to rowing, fencing, and archery.) The financial and logistical barrier to entry for the sport at the recreational level is low: all you need is a patch of grass or sand and a ten-dollar disc. Roughly 7.5 million people now play disc sports in more than ninety countries around the world, including 4.5 million in the U.S., according to W.F.D.F. and the Sports and Fitness Industry Association.

48
The sibling bond

Were you the favorite child, the wild child or the middle child? At TEDxAsheville, Jeffrey Kluger explores the profound life-long bond between brothers and sisters, and the influence of birth order, favoritism and sibling rivalry. (Filmed at TEDxAsheville.)

49
Intel announces Edison: a 22nm dual-core PC the size of an SD card

Four months ago, Intel unveiled its Quark SoC at IDF. Today at CES 2014, company CEO Brian Krzanich wants to introduce you to Edison, a miniature computer based on the same technology condensed into the form factor of an SD card. The tiny computer is built on the company's 22nm transistor technology, runs Linux and has built-in WiFi and Bluetooth modules. What's more, the tiny machine can connect to its own app store. Naturally, the device is aimed at developers, Krzanich says, who he hopes will use it to build the next generation of wearable and connected devices. Even so, Intel is leading by example, and showed a small collection of "Nursery 2.0" products using embedded Edison chips: a toy frog that reports an infant's vitals to a parent via an LED coffee cup, for example, and a milk warmer that starts heating when another connected item (the frog, again) hears the baby cry.

50
Man takes vacation from being human, becomes goat

Aside from the prosthetics, Thwaites prepared by studying the cognitive and physical aspects of what it's like to literally be a goat. He visited a behavioral psychologist and neurologist to study "turning off" parts of his brain in order to think more like a goat. He spoke to an expert in animal locomotion to nail down their movement. Even further, he met with a biologist to see about making an artificial rumen (a part of the goat's stomach) in order to digest grass.

51 The science of sync
52 We took a tour of the abandoned college campuses of Second Life
53 Disney is building a massive Star Wars world at Disneyland
54 Poetry that frees the soul
55 Why we should trust scientists
56 White House hires first openly transgender staffer
57 BBC Technology & Tech Tent
58 Forgetful scientists accidentally quadruple lithium-ion battery lifespan | Chips | Geek.com
59 iCracked : On-Demand iPhone, iPad, and Galaxy Device Repair, Worldwide.
60 How to see all the companies tracking you on Facebook — and block them
61 Stop Refrigerating Your Butter
62 Husband plants 4 miles of sunflowers in remembrance of late wife
63 Americans’ Internet Access:<br />2000-2015
64 The jaw-dropping promise -- and brain-twisting challenge -- of quantum computing
65 How Princess Reema Is Opening Doors For Women In Saudi Arabia
66 Americans’ Attitudes About Privacy, Security and Surveillance
67 7 Tech Logos Before They Became Iconic
68 40 vacation travel tips from TED staffers
69 Voices from the Mediterranean: Migrants reveal how they ended up here
70 The Late Great American Promise of Less Work
71 10 obscure, highly specialized browsers that will make you forget about Chrome, Firefox, and IE
72 Gwyneth Paltrow Goes To Market
73 UberEATS Food Delivery
74 Registered clinical trials make positive findings vanish
75 Russia burned 50 ducklings because it's pissed at Ukraine
76 Fearless seal narrowly escapes mid-air shark attack
77 Police rescue bear cub with head stuck in a protein powder jar
78 DIY Tractor Repair Runs Afoul Of Copyright Law
79 The dark side and the light: 2,000 meet in lightsaber showdown
80 Design with the blind in mind
81 How "oldschool" graphics worked.
82 Most Popular Bookshelf Speakers: Klipsch RB-61 II
83 A review of every Android phone from the past, present, and future
84 All the cyberattacks on the U.S. government (that we know of)
85 The VR successor to Second Life is inviting its first testers
86 Twitter's Adam Bain has quite a following
87 Ryan Adams wraps up Taylor Swift cover album: Listen to the teasers
88 Your torrent client could help hackers hijack your computer | ExtremeTech