Top Videos
Inside Facebook’s new “Area 404” hardware lab

This is where Facebook will prototype its solar drones, Internet-beaming lasers, VR headsets, and next-gen servers. The problem with moving faster than most..

Google mocks iPhone storage capabilities

Technically Incorrect: In a new ad for its Photos app, Google shows how much it cares about your iPhone's shortcomings.

And now, 2,000+ people falling on each other to break the Guinness World Record

The Guinness World Record for human mattress dominoes has been broken in China, just four months after the last record in the US. Who needs the Olympics?

Do Nothing Box EZ 3D Print

Some don't get it. Others laugh hysterically when they see this machine in action. It is a simple project to build, and watching others enjoy the absurdity of this box is as pleasurable as it was to build. Enjoy. Vote. Share.I saw one of these "Useless Box" years ago. I thought it was one of the funniest things I had ever seen. Recently I was introduced to 3D printing and my first idea was "I can now have a Do Nothing Box of my own."After a few attempts at hiding the hinge failed, I designed it without a hinge. Now, by just looking at the outside it is not as telling what the power-on switch will do.

Google uses its mapping technology to turn the Himalayas into a 3D field trip

The search (and maps) giant has just released a new Android game called Verne: The Himalayas. The game uses 3D imagery t

Nintendo takes down Metroid II fan remake released for 30th Anniversary | Games | Geek.com

Nintendo celebrated the 30th Anniversary of the Metroid series in a weird way- by not even mentioning it. For a company so steeped in nostalgia it was a bizarre move, to say the least. [...]

What's on your HDTV: 'No Man's Sky,' Olympics, 'The Get Down'

Watch the Olympics or explore space in 'No Man's Sky'?

Rocket League is getting a crazy new Rumble mode next month

Psyonix's blockbuster soccer-with-cars game Rocket League is getting a sweet free add-on next month, and it looks like it's going to be a blast.

John Oliver dives deep into the harrowing reality of journalism

"The newspaper industry is suffering."

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Top News
1
Jet.com | Prices Drop As You Shop

Prices drop lower as you shop

2
Autopilot in Tesla Model X helps driver get safely to a hospital

Continuing to drive while under extreme physical duress might not have been the best choice, but it was the human one, and that’s what makes Autopilot’s role in getting Neally to the hospital in one piece so poignant. Plus, the fact that Neally had a choice at all is a chance outcome of the severity of the embolism: If it had been something more severe, and he wasn’t able physically to continue driving or make a decision, Autopilot would’ve engaged its failsafe mode, which decelerates the vehicle, turns on the four-way hazard lights and slowly moves the car to the roadside.

3
Martians Might Be Real. That Makes Mars Exploration Way More Complicated

The mission he was referring to is called Mars 2020, which will land another robot rover much like Curiosity. In fact, the 2020 rover is being assembled partly with equipment left over from Curiosity’s build. The new rover will be designed to search for signs of ancient microbial life on Mars and—even more ambitiously—to collect soil samples that can be retrieved by another spacecraft and sent back to Earth. The project is being developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. And while the project’s leaders declined to talk to me, observers inside and outside of NASA say they’re in a heated battle with the Office of Planetary Protection over where they can land and what measures they need to take to sterilize their craft before it leaves for Mars. Because much of their equipment was designed or built well before the discovery of water, it wouldn’t withstand the strict protocols Conley would require today. And with the 2020 launch window rapidly approaching, the project has fallen behind schedule in getting its decontamination procedures approved by Conley’s office.

4
The Science Behind The Horrific Crash That Hospitalized an Olympic Cyclist

Leslie-Pelecky said that, based on the video, it looked like van Vleuten’s crash started when her front wheel crossed the painted line on the road. In the US, at least, road paint is less “grippy” than the asphalt. “When you’re going that fast, you’ve got a very small part of the wheel in contact with the road at any time, so if anything gets between your wheel and the road, it’s catastrophic,” she said. “For a car tire, it doesn’t happen until you get enough water under the wheel, but the tires they’re using are so thin that it doesn’t take much [to cause a crash].”

5
Suicide Squad Sets Box Office Record Because We Don't Deserve Better Movies

Here’s something twisted that will absolutely blow your goddamn mind: Suicide Squad , a very bad movie, set an August box office record on its opening weekend, raking in a hot $135.1 million in North American ticket sales, which is more than Guardians of the Galaxy, an actually good movie, brought in on its opening weekend in 2014.

6
How Google Analytics ruined marketing

Marketers in the high-tech world who use phrases such as “social media marketing,” “Facebook marketing” and “content marketing” do not understand the basic difference between marketing strategies, marketing channels and marketing content. And Google Analytics is to blame.

7
Apple Watch 2 coming this year with faster processor, GPS, and more: report

Apple is said to be planning two new models of the Watch for 2016. The bigger upgrade, dubbed "Apple Watch 2" for now, will reportedly have "the same general design" as the current Watch, but include new internal components such as a GPS radio, a barometer, a thinner display, and a new, faster 16nm processor from TSMC. These features will require a larger battery, according to Kuo, preventing Apple from cutting down on the device's size.

8
Edward Snowden tweeted gibberish and people are trying to figure out what it all means

This isn't a code you can crack with Google (we tried), so therefore the people of the internet started falling over themselves to work out what the hell it meant. So far, there has been little success.

9
iPhone 7 rumored to include pressure-sensitive home button

Bloomberg also reveals some additional details around the dual-camera system that's expected to debut with the larger iPhone 7. Both sensors will capture color differently and simultaneously take pictures that are then merged into a single photo. The end result is rumored to improve brightness and detail in photos, and sharpen photos taken in low-light scenarios. Apple's larger iPhone 7 is also expected to support better zoom thanks to the two camera sensors, but the smaller version of the iPhone 7 isn't expected to include the dual-camera system.

10
Delta flights grounded after systems outage - BBC News

The airline is the latest to suffer computer problems, with Southwest Airlines last month forced to cancel more than 2,000 flights after an outage prevented travellers checking in.

11
NBC announcer criticized for saying swimmer's husband 'responsible' for gold medal

Speaking to the Associated Press , Hicks defended his call, saying, "with live TV, there are often times you look back and wished you had said things differently ... It is impossible to tell Katinka's story accurately without giving appropriate credit to Shane, and that's what I was trying to do."

12
33 Ways You Can Increase Social Media Engagement with Your Brand | Marketing Technology

Always reply to any @mention you receive on social media – this lets people know you care and you listen which in turn increases engagement.

13
Explore Australia’s Shark Bay Without Something Weird Biting You

The British photographer started making aerials five years ago while working as a fashion photographer in Sydney. He spent a lot of time shooting on the beach. Curious about what it looked like from above, he rented a helicopter and flew over the shoreline near his apartment. The lines, textures, and colors astounded him. Clarke has made aerial photographs all around the world, but Australia’s almost surreal beauty keeps him returning.

14
'Pokémon Go' earns estimated $200 million in its first month

In that first month, the augmented reality mobile game, created by San Francisco-based developer Niantic, earned more than $200 million in global net revenue, according to an estimate by app development platform Sensor Tower .

15
Rackspace sells Cloud Sites unit to Liquid Web

Liquid Web promises that it will keep the entire Cloud Sites unit intact in San Antonio, TX where it’s based, and that creative customers who have been using Cloud Sites should get a smooth transition to the new owners. In fact, Liquid Web is promising to expand Cloud Sites moving forward.

16
Apple’s embarrassment over the Maps debacle led it to start public beta testing for new i0S releases

When Apple started public beta testing for new iOS releases, users were pleasantly surprised but also left scratching their heads at what prompted the intensely secretive company to take the step. The reason for the change: It was in direct response to the disastrous debut of Maps in 2012 (as part of iOS 6), which was panned by the public, prompted numerous apologies from CEO Tim Cook, and led to the exit of executive Scott Forstall , Apple senior vice president Eddy Cue tells Fast Company 's Rick Tetzeli in his new cover story, "Playing The Long Game Inside Tim Cook's Apple."  

17
How to Monitor Multiple Social Media Metrics in a Single Dashboard : Social Media Examiner

Cyfe’s free plan includes up to five widgets. It’s perfect for individuals or small businesses that need to track only basic analytics. There’s also a premium version that gives you access to unlimited widgets starting at $19 per month.

18
Tired man wearing a 'Stop Taking Selfies’ shirt appears in selfie

That's the predicament in this photo posted to Reddit by user MicrowaveSama, which is a selfie taken by her father while vacationing at Campo di Fiore in Rome, Italy. Stopping right in the shot is a world-weary man in a rainbow-striped shirt reading "Stop Taking #Selfies," with a tired face, suggesting this is one of many, many selfies that he's photobombed.

19
Wilson Just Made the Smartest Football of All Time

To conserve energy, the sensor is in sleep mode most of the time. Once you’ve launched the app and an activity, the app prompts you to wake the ball up. This involves holding the ball vertically with both hands for two seconds, then flipping it vertically and holding it for two seconds. It takes some practice to work consistently, but the unique pattern activates the sensor and Bluetooth. It also helps prevent draining the battery by accident.

20
Leslie Jones tweeting the Olympics got her invited to the games

is a global, multi-platform media and entertainment company. Powered by its own proprietary technology, Mashable is the go-to source for tech, digital culture and entertainment content for its dedicated and influential audience around the globe.

21
Twilio reports revenue of $64.5 million in first quarter as a public company

“We delivered strong results in our first quarter as a public company, as we saw continued growth across our product lines,” remarked Jeff Lawson, Twilio’s cofounder and CEO. “Customers around the world use Twilio to build differentiated experiences for their end users by embedding communications into their software applications. The successful completion of our IPO in June will provide additional capital and brand visibility to drive our growth in the future as we look to fuel the future of communications.”

22
4K Video Showcases iPhone 7, iPhone 7 Plus and iPhone 7 Pro

Three different models of the iPhone 7 have been revealed in a super-sharp 4K video ahead of Apple’s official unveiling this fall. The hands-on has us questioning the possibility of an “ iPhone 7 Pro ” once again.

23
Wilson X Connected Football turns practice into an epic game

Can gamifying practice using a sensor-enabled ball and tracking software truly make a difference in your game? It's early days, so it's too soon to tell, but this very logical step toward harnessing mobile technology in the age of sports analytics is too full of potential to ignore. So no matter what the early results, Wilson's growing line of Connected balls are a welcome "first down" into the future.

24
The Search for a New Type of Neutrino Turns Up Empty

Particle physicists don’t invent impossibly inscrutable particles for the love of the game, of course. Wolfgang Pauli was horrified when he first predicted the existence of neutrinos back in 1930. “I have done something very bad today,” he said, “by proposing a particle that cannot be detected; it is something no theorist should ever do.” He did it anyway, because neutrinos solved problems that were cropping up at the time. And physicists eventually figured out ways to detect neutrinos: the electron neutrino in 1956, the muon neutrino in 1962, and the tau neutrino in 2000.

25
How Witchcraft on Facebook Is Helping People Grieve

One of the first things I asked of Nick Detloff was that he cast a spell on me. The 36-year-old Michigan resident says he’s the only person offering real-time spellcasting on Facebook Live, and based on my own research, that’s true. (Many Wiccan-centered groups on the platform are closed or hidden, including the one Detloff broadcasts his videos in.) Detloff invited me to participate in one of his rituals. It ended up becoming one of the strangest experiences of my life.

26
Massive 'No Man's Sky' day one patch is live a day early

No Man's Sky's substantial first-day patch is available now for the PlayStation 4, a day earlier than the game's August 9th release date. The patch's file size is 824MB, which isn't too large considering the number of fundamental changes it makes to how the game plays, but it is roughly a quarter of the game's size, which is 3.69GB.

27
Pokémon Go Banned in Iran Over Security Concerns

While Pokémon Go has proven itself massively popular (duh) all over the world, some countries aren’t getting in on the action, or haven’t yet. However, one country announced today that it won’t be participating at all.

28
Siberian Child Dies After Climate Change Thaws an Anthrax-Infected Reindeer

Five adults and two other children have been diagnosed with the disease, which is known as “Siberian plague” in Russian and was last seen in the region in 1941. More than 2,300 reindeer have died, and at least 63 people have been evacuated from a quarantine area around the site of the outbreak. “We literally fought for the life of each person, but the infection showed its cunning,” the Yamal governor, Dmitry Kobylkin, told the Russia-based Interfax news agency. “It returned after 75 years and took the life of a child.”

29
Updated Apple Watch 1 with Faster Chipset to Be Unveiled Alongside Apple Watch 2 Later This Year

Kuo expects Apple to further drop prices of the Apple Watch once it launches the new variants later this year. He did not clarify if the existing Apple Watch model will see a price cut or the upgraded variants. In all probability, it is likely that we will see Apple replace the current Apple Watch with an upgraded variant, which it will sell at a slightly lower price. It makes little sense for the company to offer three different variants of the Apple Watch to consumers at the same time.

30
Snapchat's biggest threat is its own design

With the  introduction of Instagram stories this week , the internet had a collective conniption fit over the cloning of one of Snapchat’s most popular features. Now, in addition to posting a pristine filtered photo to your Instagram timeline, you also can snap a rough selfie, doodle over it, and watch it disappear after 24 hours. Instagram didn’t even bother to alter the name, and its CEO doesn’t seem embarrassed about it. "You’re going to see stories pop up in other networks over time, because it’s one of the best ways to show visual information in chronological order," Kevin Systrom explained to The Verge .

31
As earnings sag, Twitter is looking to sublease out 183,000 square feet from its headquarters

Still, despite their shrinking office space, Twitter insists that they're not going anywhere: "We’re always looking at ways to use our office spaces more efficiently and effectively. We remain committed to our home in San Francisco’s mid-Market area," says a Twitter spokesperson.

32
Where to find Olympic-themed Apple Watch bands if you're not in Rio

Now, Apple Watch wearers can show their team spirit without having to travel to Brazil. Accessories maker Casetify has an Olympic capsule collection currently on sale. These 20 bands are also inspired by the flags of national teams competing in Rio, including the U.S., Germany, Japan, Australia, and Brazil, of course. Casetify’s Olympic bands costs $49, the same price as Apple’s official straps. The only difference is that the Casetify bands are plastic for a more athleisure style, while Apple’s bands are made from the new woven nylon material that the company debuted back in March.

33
India ride-hailing firm Ola sideswiped as Uber, Didi team up in China

NEW DELHI Didi Chuxing's acquisition of Uber's China business last week reshapes the landscape in Asia's growing ride-hailing sector, and leaves India's Ola more vulnerable to attack by Uber in its $12 billion home market.

34
Andy Carvin Talks About First Look Media Shutting Down Reported.ly

The most disappointing aspect of this is that we actually exceeded my initial expectations, and that in the end it didn’t really matter. We established our brand as a trusted go-to source for global breaking news, especially on stories related to conflict and human rights. We developed a huge source network and received lots of positive encouragement from our peers. We won a Breaking News award from the Online News Association. And we’ve been growing like gangbusters too—our FB page has grown from 18k fans in January to nearly 130k fans today. It was all coming together, and we were eager to begin scaling up and exploring our revenue potential. But here we are.

35
Daring Fireball: 'Playing the Long Game Inside Tim Cook's Apple'

Under Cook’s leadership, Apple has come to seem quite fallible to many people. Its recent products have seemed far less than perfect, at least compared to the collective memory of its astonishing iPod–iPhone–iPad run from 2001 to 2010. There are the public embarrassments, like its 2012 introduction of Maps, or those 2014 videos of reviewers bending, and breaking, an iPhone 6 Plus. Apple Pay hasn’t become the standard for a cashless society, and the Apple Watch “is not the watch we expect from Apple,” according to John Gruber, editor of Daring Fireball, the preeminent Apple-centric website. Then there are the design flaws: Apple Music has been saddled with too many features, as if it were something designed by, God forbid, Microsoft; the lens on the back of the iPhone 6 extrudes; the new Apple TV has an illogical interface and confusing remote control.

36
A Troubling Snag in the Comeback of the California Condor

In one of conservation’s greatest success stories, a frantic captive breeding program brought the huge, glorious scavenger roaring back; today, the condors number close to 450, over half of which are wild. While an outright ban on lead ammunition won’t kick in until 2019, aggressive public education has helped safeguard the species—inland at least. But scientists have found a new threat to the reestablished condors: extremely high levels of mercury and the pesticide DDT in the birds’ blood. This time, it’s an appetite for marine mammal flesh that may threaten the condor.

37
How Samsung plans its phones

Based on our ergonomic study, there’s a huge demand for the 67mm width. You know we have the Note portfolio, our second flagship. So we have two flagships for the S series on one hand, and the Note series on the other. At the end of the day we sell three at the same time, so how we manage the portfolio — that’s the question, right? So last year we have 5.1-inch flat, and 5.1-inch Edge, and 5.7-inch Note. So we thought that that was the optimized portfolio at the time. But we realized that some of the compact customers also wanted a bigger screen size at the same time. Some who used to use compact phones moved to a bigger screen but still they don’t want to accept the really big 5.7-inch screen, and also they want to have a compact size. So we found out what’s the optimum screen size and device width, and that’s the 72.x mm. We changed our portfolio a little bit — 5.1-inch, that’s a real compact size without 3D glass, and it’s a cheaper technology. So it’s a reasonable price, compact, and with all the fantastic S7 features. Then we have the 5.5-inch Edge, and then maybe in August or September we’re going to launch the next Note, so we’ll have a full portfolio.

38
10 Tricks to Make Yourself a Google Maps Master

Google Maps has been available for more than 10 years now, and since its launch, a huge swatch of features and functions have been added to the service. Are you sure you know all of them? Here are our favorite tips and tricks for getting more out of Google’s mapping service.

39
ESA plans to study the wind by shooting lasers from space

The project will study how winds work in order to improve weather tracking, scanning and gauging clouds, air and whatever else is up there in the sky. It's all centered around atmospheric dynamics: thunderstorms, hurricanes, jet streams and worldwide air circulation. The setup involves lasers that will beam UV light at Earth. As this bounces off small particles and air molecules, the part that's bounced back towards the satellite, collected and recorded in the telescope. As the satellite will be so close by, data can be delivered and analyses in near-real time -- the work starts as soon as it's up and working in space. The space agency has named the satellite ADM-Aeouls, after the keeper of the winds in Homer's Odyssey. Even he didn't have lasers though.

40
iPhone 7 could replace the home button with a touch surface

Don’t forget that the home button is also in charge of scanning your fingerprints with Touch ID. Replacing the home button isn’t easy or cheap. If a third-party repair shop replaces your home button, you won’t be able to use Touch ID anymore and it weakens the security of your phone, as the secure enclave is disabled.

41 Delta computer system meltdown puts all flights on hold

After a strange succession of software bugs and glitches delayed and grounded flights across several airlines last year , you'd think system resilience would be top-notch by now. Delta Airlines, however, is living through one of these nightmare moments today, with all departing flights on hold at the time of writing. A widespread computer meltdown is at the heart of the problem, with Delta issuing the standard "we're working on it" statement, and warning any passengers booked in to travel today not to head to the airport without checking the status of their flight first.

42
'Quadrooter' flaws affect over 900 million Android phones | ZDNet

A Qualcomm spokesperson said the chipmaker has fixed all of the flaws, and had issued patches to customers, partners, and the open source community between April and the end of July. Most of those fixes have already gone into Android's monthly set of security patches, which Google issues early each month to its own-brand Nexus devices. Many other phone and tablet makers roll out those patches at the same time or in the following few days.

43
This tiny chip could be the future of robot vision

For robots to operate in the physical world, they need a decent pair of eyes. Usually, this job is taken care of using LIDAR — a technology that bounces light off nearby surfaces to create a 3D map of the world around it. LIDAR is just like radar in its basic mechanics, but because it uses light, not radio waves, it's much more accurate; able to pick out individual leaves on a tree  when mounted on a plane , or track the movements of cyclists and pedestrians when fitted to a self-driving cars .

44
Pokémon Go goes live in 15 more countries

Niantic is certainly going to be busy monitoring its server uptime with the massive influx of new players that came online over the weekend. However, it hasn’t yet launched the game in three major mobile and gaming markets: India, China and Korea.

45
How Hackers Are Going For Gold At Rio's Olympics

Stockholm-based wireless technology provider Aptilo Networks has said that it's working with telecom companies to provide wireless connections at Olympic venues, transportation hubs, beaches, and cafes in the Rio area. The company has said that it's taking steps to ensure security and suitable bandwidth for those visiting for the Games, though it wasn't able to make someone available for an interview to discuss those steps in detail. Brazilian telecom company Linktel has said it's working with Aptilo and with international Wi-Fi carriers like Boingo and AT&T to let their subscribers connect to its network with their own credentials.

46
Analyst claims Apple Watch 2 due later this year

The report also mentions that LTE support will come to the watch in 2017 and that the 2018 version will be medically reliable enough for FDA approval. LTE in a smartwatch isn't impossible since we've already seen it in LG's Urbane LTE, but we expect that Apple will, again, need to research low-power options before adding it. As for FDA approval, we can't speculate on something that's so far away, although Apple is one of a handful of tech companies with the money and patience to see something like that through. Not to mention, of course, that it's already made in-roads into drug research using its ResearchKit platform .

47
5 Podcasts to Play Alongside the Olympics This Week

Unfortunately, it’s tricky to watch the Olympics or follow the latest Trump social media exploits while on the job. (While actually doing the job, that is.) Fortunately, your commute provides valuable catch-up time. This week, cue up these podcasts for the audio diaries of Claressa Shields, who won the first women’s gold medal for middleweight boxing in 2012 at 16 years old, and a lively debate over how much teen Tumblrs and tweets will matter when a generation who grew up with social media runs for office. That’s not all—your commute can also include the family legacy of traveling salesmen, 3,000 self-righteous beatniks, and an opera about urban planning activist Jane Jacobs.

48
UK newspapers are teaming up to take on Google and Facebook in the online ad market

UK national newspapers The Sun, The Guardian, The Daily Mail, and The Times are teaming up in a bid to ward off the threat of Google and Facebook to advertising revenue.

49
Walmart is buying a 2-year-old online store for $3b

Jet.com launched in the US a little over a year ago with scores of products on offer, ranging from TVs to apparel to household essentials. Last October – just three months after it opened for business – it dropped its $49 membership fee in a bid to woo more customers. And in May, it began trialing grocery delivery services across the country.

50
Thermostats can now get infected with ransomware, because 2016

The Wi-Fi enabled thermostat that the researchers targeted is basically a Linux computer. It allows the user to upload wallpapers and configuration settings through an SD card; that’s what they use as a vehicle to install a malicious program onto the device. At this point, an attacker would have full control over the thermostat.

51 Walmart Agrees to Acquire Jet.com, One of the Fastest Growing e-Commerce Companies in the U.S.
52 Reverse Engineering a Quadcopter RC, or: How to not miss the needle while throwing the haystack in the air (Part 1)
53 Finger-Guiding Invisible Screen Protector Is the Best Way to Cheat at Pokémon Go
54 To Keep Watching Hulu For Free, You'll Now Need To Use... Yahoo?
55 Martha Stewart and Snoop Dogg Are Cooking Up a Dinner Party Reality Show
56 Here Are Some Olympians Who Have Probably Eaten Poop
57 NBC is bringing some of its top shows to Snapchat (kinda)
58 Gymnast's mom and dad have earned the gold medal in proud parenting
59 A Fact Check of the Department of Energy's Fact Check of Stranger Things
60 Chicago Tribune scrutinized for sexist Olympic medalist headline
61 Ancient Stone Tools Hint at the Real Paleo Diet
62 Unified UI, faster development, and other reasons chatbots are better than apps
63 Justin Bieber's dad's favorite subject is still, unfortunately, Justin Bieber's penis
64 How the Events of Suicide Squad Affect the DC Movie Universe
65 Want to Find Aliens? Look for Planets That Have Become Stars
66 FACT: New Zealand Is Better Than Australia
67 How To Dodge Questions About Your Salary History On Job Interviews
68 Remains of the Day: Lyft Will Soon Let You Make Multiple Stops on a Trip
69 Skully founders may have used Kickstarter cash for strip clubs
70 'Pokémon Go' update warns you not to catch and drive
71 🔥HOT TAKE: Pokémon Go Is a Bad Game🔥
72 9 Ways Tim Cook Has Transformed Apple
73 Here’s what the Apple Watch 2 will probably be like
74 The Internet Archive just uploaded thousands of playable Amiga games
75 NBC signs deal to create original content for Snapchat
76 ReadWrite on Twitter
77 ReadWrite on Twitter
78 Ethan Atkinson on Twitter
79 Scientists have researched if drunk or stoned sex is better for you
80 ReadWrite on Twitter
81 Mossberg: Why Am I So Cranky?
82 Fox is making a game show based on an app that will test your song knowledge
83 Twitch is cracking down on 'Pokémon Go' cheaters
84 This guy spent $18,000 to win a Jet contest — now he's a multimillionaire after its sale to Walmart
85 Amazon Japan raided on suspicion of antitrust practices
86 Burger King announces the Tex-Mex 'Whopperrito' mashup
87 Day-one patches are the new normal
88 July in Africa: All the tech news you shouldn’t miss
89 PS4 Neo being unveiled in early September, report says
90 Explore 'Quadrilateral Cowboy' even further with its source code
91 Tech in Latin America: Olympics kick-off, WhatsApp déjà-vu and more