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Samsung recalls Galaxy Note 7 phones after battery fires

Up to 1m devices across 10 markets, including the US and Australia, will be affected, analysts estimate

Samsung announces exchange program for Galaxy Note 7 after defective batteries halt sales

After reports of the Galaxy Note 7 "exploding," Samsung halted shipments of the device in the company's home country.

Video shows SpaceX's Falcon 9 exploding on the launch pad

Video has surfaced of the Falcon 9 rocket explosion that happened this morning at SpaceX's launch facility in Cape Canaveral. US Launch Report, a nonprofit video production company that brings...

'Firewatch' comes to Xbox One on September 21st with bonus modes

A 'Firewatch' Audio Tour and free roam mode will come to the Microsoft console first. 

SpaceX rocket explosion blows up Facebook's satellite plans

Things go very wrong during the test-firing of a Falcon 9 rocket set to launch a satellite that would have beamed Wi-Fi to Africa, courtesy of Facebook.

Here’s Everything You Need to Watch on Netflix Next Month

Netflix is getting into the Fall TV game in a big way this year. Here's what you need to prioritize in your streaming queue.

The Best iPhone Camera Add-On Just Learned a Ton of New Tricks

The DxO One's new software update makes it the best camera friend your phone ever had.

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Top News
1
Google reportedly kills Project Ara modular phone | ZDNet

The move to shutter Project Ara could come as Google looks to streamline its hardware division. Google brought on Motorola president Rick Osterloh to oversee the regrouping, according to Reuters. The changes could be bigger than just Project Ara, as the Nexus program is rumored to get the axe, with new Pixel smartphones to take the place .

2
Netflix Finally Renews Stranger Things, and Here's the First Teaser for Season Two

In case you can’t be bothered—or can’t play video wherever you are, I don’t know your life—to spend a minute watching words appear slowly on screen, here are the titles of the nine episodes that Netflix has ordered:

3
Ireland has decided to fight the EU on Apple tax bill

Apple, keen to defend its own interests, has already said it will lodge an appeal. For Fine Gael, the main Irish coalition party, a broader principle is at stake. It wants to take on Brussels to safeguard Ireland’s decades-old low corporate tax policy that has drawn in multinationals such as Apple, creating one in 10 jobs in what was once an impoverished country.

4
The Biggest Air Cannon in the World Would Dominate Vaping Competitions

Built for a Czech TV show called Wonders of Nature , the air cannon requires a small army to pull back and prime its massive air bladder. Its bark is worse than its bite, though, so don’t expect the military to start looking into these for combat—unless one day our enemy’s roll up in cardboard tanks.

5
6 Ways Content Marketing Has Changed Public Relations

As you can see, as our communications (and lives) become increasingly digital, the lines between traditional public relations and modern content marketing continue to blur. This is a good thing. It presents us with an opportunity to be creative in how we tell and share our stories with our audiences.

6
Solar Power Plant Can’t Figure Out How to Stop Frying Birds

Each year, around 6,000 birds are incinerated after chasing bugs within the Ivanpah concentrated solar thermal plant in the California Mojave Desert. Officials at the facility are enacting all sorts of measures to prevent this ongoing avian massacre—but it’s not clear if anything’s working.

7
This data-stealing Trojan is the first to also infect you with ransomware | ZDNet

As if stealing your personal data wasn't bad enough, one form of Trojan malware has now become the first of its kind by also infecting victims with ransomware, forcing targets to pay to regain access to their computer as well as compromising their credentials.

8
You probably don’t need a $3,200 gold-plated Walkman

I mean, yeah, it sounds good. It’s a $3,200 Walkman. It had better sound good. And hey, it sounds even better when paired with a $2,300 pair of Sony headphones (MDR-Z1R) and that new $2,200 Sony headphone app (NW-WM1Z). That’s a grand total of $7,700 for me to listen to a really crisp cello cover of “Every Breath You Take.”

9
Apple Releases Security Updates for OS X El Capitan, OS X Yosemite and Safari

The security exploit was being used to obtain, or otherwise expose, a variety of different secure elements on a person’s iPhone, including their text messages, contacts, emails, and even phone call information via a sophisticated jailbreak and malware attack. According to reports, the exploit was being used to track journalists, as well as other individuals.

10
Samsung to halt Galaxy Note 7 sales and replace phones following battery explosions | ZDNet

"Those who are using the Galaxy Note 7 can get anxious, so we have prepared a software for our service centers that can check whether the battery on their phones is faulty or not," said Koh. "Starting Saturday [in Korea] they can use the software at the centers to check their batteries."

11
Isolinear Chip Flash Drives Are Definitely Where Picard Would Stash His Data

You’d have assumed that by the time the 24th century rolled around, wi-fi would be available across the galaxy. But Picard’s Enterprise apparently still relied on isolinear chips—Star Trek’s version of flash drives— to share data. ThinkGeek’s version probably isn’t quite as advanced , but you don’t have to tell your imagination that.

12
Why Superman's Lame Disguise Might Actually Work

It’s been a longstanding complaint since the first Superman comics debuted in the 1930s: why doesn’t anyone see through Clark Kent’s lame disguise and realize that he’s really Superman? New research suggests that Kent’s trademark glasses actually might work as a disguise—at least around people who don’t know him well.

13
The Most Common Push-Up Mistakes and How to Fix Them

Push-ups look so deceptively easy. Everyone knows how to do them in theory, but when asked to do one, most people make various little mistakes that can cause problems and injuries down the road. These subtle mistakes are common and simple to fix once you’re aware.

14
Could the future of Android be Windows? | ZDNet

The many failings of Google's operating system have already been fixed in Microsoft's Windows 10 Mobile ecosystem. Could Redmond possibly have the upper hand after all in future mobile wars?

15
There's now a Prisma-like Twitter bot that will paint whatever you want

Now there’s also a Twitter bot  so talented it will convert any image you tweet to it into a piece of art in a matter of seconds – animated GIFs included.

16
It’s Way Past Time for Every Phone to Be Waterproof

It’s obviously good for consumers to have more phones that can handle a drizzle. But the case for waterproof phones is also remarkably easy to make to manufacturers. At least, that’s what Simon McElrea, CEO of electronics-waterproofing company Semblant, tells me. It’s simple economics: A lot of phones get returned, he says, “and at least half of that return rate is damage.” Maintaining a return and repair infrastructure is expensive, so if you have fewer repairs, you make more money. Plus, as the usable lifespan of a smartphone gets longer, companies can refurbish and recycle devices as long as they continue to work. Even as they make new phones, McElrea says, “95 percent of the components are the same generation to generation. You upgrade the processor, maybe a new version of the memory, but just about everything else is the same.” The longer those parts continue to work, the more times you can re-sell them for more money.

17
Save Your Money, Skip The MBA, And Go To Startup Grad School Instead

Since launching last November, the brand has done very well, particularly with millennials who are tired of older luggage concepts. It is on track to sell more than 50,000 suitcases this year, which translates to over $10 million in sales. Since very few people have any brand loyalty to luggage companies, it is relatively easy to convince a new consumer to give their brand a try, especially since the bags are priced at between $225 and $295, which is a fraction of the price of comparable companies. "We're using the same skills that we acquired at startup grad school," says Korey. "But we're working for ourselves, which is a dream come true."

18
Business Insider launches official account on LINE, the messaging app beating Facebook in Asia

Business Insider launches official account on LINE, the messaging app beating Facebook in Asia

19
Review: The Hello Sense is an excellent sleep monitor that you'll actually want to use

Unlike a lot of people I know, I don’t have much trouble falling asleep at night or waking up on time for appointments or the daily grind. That’s certainly a blessing, and one I don’t take for granted.

20
Here's How You Can Exchange Your Samsung Galaxy Note 7

After 35 reports of the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 overheating and exploding, Samsung recalled the device early Friday morning. Now, Samsung has announced an exchange program for the device, effective immediately. Tim Baxter, the president of Samsung Electronics America, is actively encouraging customers to trade-in their Note 7s, calling the company’s recall “proactive.”

21
Every Perfect Gene Wilder Comedic Pause--All In One Video Essay

WHY WE CARE: By now, most superfans know the story of Gene Wilder coming up with one of the more memorable moments of Willy Wonka and The Chocolate Factory . It was his decision that his character should totter out to the crowd clutching a cane for his grand entrance , almost fall down, and then glide into a somersault. This little touch reveals the kind of inspiration and perceptiveness that made Wilder such a celebrated comic actor and collaborator. However, it's the 'almost falling down' part of this scene that demonstrates one of the dearly departed performer's under-praised gifts: his mastery of the comedic pause.

22
Crazy Stadium Roofs Are Now a Thing. Here Are the Craziest

It appears inclement weather will no longer stop us from enjoying our beloved sports. Neither will our imagination, as retractable, fabric, plastic, and other innovative and audaciously designed roofs gain traction around the world. The biggest obstacle is cost, but that is retracting too, as designers use lighter, cheaper, more flexible materials. And as the technology and knowledge to build these structures proliferates, stadium roofs are becoming more and more fantastical. Because who doesn’t want a Fabergé egg over their head?

23
Uber wants to take over public transit, one small town at a time

Yet, as officials from both Uber and Lyft emphasized in speaking with me, America’s largest cities could be mere sideshows compared to smaller towns and suburbs. And some experts say that the highest-density subway and bus lines could not be replaced by Uber anyway, arguing that it would cause too much roadway congestion. But the vast majority of Americans live in places more like car-dominated Altamonte than hyperdense Manhattan. "That is an emerging area where you can expect to see more activity," said Emily Castor, director of transportation policy at Lyft. Castor says Lyft is "very interested" in propagating the Altamonte model across the country and sees it as "an opportunity to grow Lyft in suburban areas rather than just the urban core." Uber’s Saltzberg noted that only 2 or 3 percent of total trips in the US are done via public transit and asserts that Uber wants to be "a tool in the toolkit for cities that are trying to make better transportation choices."

24
Get ready for new Beats (wireless?) headphones at the iPhone event

Established in 2006 as the brainchild of legendary artist and producer Dr. Dre and Chairman of Interscope Geffen A&M Records Jimmy Iovine, Beats Electronics provides a premium sound experience at every touch point of the consumer’s life. It is the parent company of the Beats™ by Dr. Dre™ line of high-quality headphones, Beats Audio™ HD-sound systems, and the MOG digital music service. The …

25
Microsoft's new business model for Windows 10: Pay to play | ZDNet

But the biggest change is the availability of the Group Policy Editor, another Pro-only feature. In previous Windows editions, Group Policy was mostly an enterprise management tool. In Windows 10, it's the only way to configure Windows Update for Business. If you want to defer the upgrade to a new version of Windows for up to four months, you need to pay for the Pro upgrade.

26
3 Terrible Habits I Learned At Apple--And Why I Unlearned Them

Startups benefit from open communication; basically any press is good press, and any collaboration among smart people might create a new opportunity. Early interactions with customers is critical. And when given enough latitude, individuals are fonts of creativity—that's why you hired them. But Apple was no longer a startup by the time I worked there, and it hadn't been for a long time before that. For all its well-deserved cachet, it proved a poor training ground for somebody trying to run an early-stage business.

27
ReadWrite on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

28
Why You Should Always Add a Bit of Sugar to Salad Dressing

Making a good dressing is all about striking that perfect balance of flavors. Sugar not only adds sweetness, but balances out acidic bite and tempers saltiness. In terms of ratios, Epicurious recommends a pinch of sugar or 1/2 to 1 teaspoon liquid sweetener for every tablespoon of vinegar in your dressing . You are, of course, not limited to table sugar. Honey, agave, maple syrup, and even jam are all perfectly acceptable sweetness sources—and you should click the link below for flavor pairing ideas—but I’m most excited about making fruity vinaigrettes out of all the random fruit preserves hanging out in my fridge. (Lookin’ at you lingonberry IKEA jam.)

29
Crunch Report | SpaceX Hyperloop Test Track

Here’s a first look at the SpaceX Hyperloop test track

30
Trump’s Surreal Campaign Is More Like Twitter Than We Ever Realized

For months, Trump-watchers had awaited the long-promised “pivot,” in which the candidate softened his rhetoric and immigration policies to make himself more attractive to the general electorate. Yesterday, he both pivoted and anti-pivoted , almost simultaneously. Speaking with the president of Mexico, he downplayed his much-lauded wall, praised Mexican-Americans, and painted illegal immigration as a humanitarian crisis, seemingly abandoning the nationalist fervor that had defined his campaign for months. But just hours later, he was back at it, repeating his claim that Mexico would pay for his wall and asserting that “anyone who has entered the United States illegally is subject to deportation”—reiterating his promise to evict millions within months of his election. The whole process was disorienting, self-contradictory, and overwhelming. You know, just like Twitter.

31
Walmart is cutting 7,000 jobs due to automation, and it’s not alone

At the beginning of the year, we reported that robots were expected to replace some five million jobs by 2020 . It’s not even the end of the year yet, and this prediction already seems well on its way to coming true. The clairvoyant folks over at the World Economic Forum warned of a “Fourth Industrial Revolution” involving the rise of the machine in the workforce, and the latest company to lend credence to that claim is none other than Walmart, which is planning on cutting 7,000 jobs on account of automation.

32
Remains of the Day: You Can Now Pinch to Zoom on Instagram

The day has finally arrived: You can now zoom into images and videos on Instagram. Previously, the only method to enlarge images was moving the phone closer to your face.

33
Google said to debut Pixel phones, Echo competitor, VR headset and more in October

Fall tends to bring new hardware from Google, which mainly involves new Nexus smartphones built in tandem with OEM partners. This year, things could be quite different since Google has a number of hardware projects in the works, and the Nexus brand is reportedly being replaced with a Pixel-badged line of smartphone devices .

34
2016 Social Media Marketing Stats for SMBs [Infographic]

Social media continues to grow at a tremendous rate, while also making it easier than ever for small businesses to connect with customers. Both SMBs and consumers are growing more accustomed to sharing and learning about product and services on social media.

35
Razer upgrades Blade Stealth laptop with new Intel CPU, more RAM, and a bigger battery

The Blade Stealth, Razer’s 12.5-inch ultrabook, only made its debut in January of this year, but it’s already getting its first significant upgrade with a major spec bump. Headlining the new changes is a 2.7GHz Intel Core i7-7500U processor, part of the brand-new Kaby Lake generation of chips. It’s accompanied by a doubling of RAM and storage, taking the top spec up to 16GB of the former and 1TB of PCIe SSD space for the latter. The laptop’s battery capacity has also been improved by an appreciable amount, going from 45Wh to 53.4Wh. Equipped with a 4K (3840 x 2160) touchscreen display, a maxed-out Blade Stealth will set you back $1,799.

36
A Tax Expert Takes Tim Cook's EU Letter Apart Point By Point

Gardner: We weren’t in the room, so we can’t know whether or not they [Apple] ever asked for a special deal. But it’s hard to deny that they received one, in the sense that they’re using an arcane legal structure that is simply not available to the many smaller businesses Apple competes with. When they say "the same kind of guidance" is "available to any company," they mean that in theory any company could choose to employ their highly paid accounting and legal teams to construct the same artificial, tax-motivated network of subsidiaries that Apple did. But this is ludicrous, since most small businesses simply don’t have the resources to construct an elaborate tax-dodging scheme of this kind. It’s like saying that anyone could go start a company to send a rocket to Mars, even though only Elon Musk actually did it.

37
Everything you need to know about 'Stranger Things' — the Netflix show people are obsessed with

The search for Will goes cold: Chief Hopper wonders if Will's disappearance has something to do with the strange secrecy surrounding Hawkins Laboratory. He talks his way into the lab and finds very little. But upon watching security footage from the night Will disappeared, he realizes there's no rain in the footage. That's strange because there was a big storm that night. Hopper begins to think Brenner may know more than he's admitting.

38
Qualcomm plots cheaper VR with all-in-one headset

While that might sound expensive—particularly as the VR820 essentially integrates a high-end smartphone into its Galaxy Gear-like shell—Qualcomm hopes that third-party manufacturers will be able to save on R&D costs by using the platform, thus bringing down the overall cost. Qualcomm performed a similar trick with smartphones, putting out a series of reference designs that several manufacturers (particularly those in China) used to produce smartphones at cheaper prices.

39
Nintendo’s NX console said to ditch discs and go back to cartridges

One more point about using cartridges instead of optical discs: there’s a certain retro appeal to it. While we haven’t heard anything truly official about what the NX will offer, Ubisoft’s CEO said in July that the game should boast a ton of casual appeal like prior offerings. Nintendo has a strong history of being something everyone in the family could enjoy, and even something as simple as using cartridges could tug at the nostalgia centers of the brains of parents who grew up playing NES with their own elders and siblings.

40
Update OS X Right Now or You Could Get Some Nasty Spyware

Oh and while you’re at it, you should update iOS as well. (Just go to Settings > General > Software Update on your device, and follow the instructions.) The urgent OS X patch comes a week after Lookout Security and Citizen Lab discovered a nasty strain of spyware that could hijack an iPhone with a simple text message. Lookout Security’s Mike Murray called it “one of the most sophisticated pieces of cyberespionage software we’ve ever seen.”

41
Apple’s App Store Is About to Get Soooooooo Much Better

Something I’ve seen on the iPhone and iPad—especially with games—are apps that are still available for download (or for sale!) but then won’t even launch after being downloaded. That’s a bad experience for everyone and it’s a good thing Apple is finally addressing the deluge of abandonware that exists in the App Store.

42
Review: Garmin Virb Ultra 30

Garmin makes wearable sensor tech of all sorts, so it makes sense that the new Ultra 30 packs a GPS radio, a barometer (for elevation), an accelerometer (for force and motion), a gyroscope (for rotation), and a compass (for bearing). All of that data can be overlayed onto your video (if you use Garmin’s app or desktop editing software). I’ve always liked this approach. Point-of-view footage doesn’t always do a great job of capturing things like speed of descent or steepness of terrain, and it’s nice to be able to add that layer of detail. Using those sensors, you can slap a text overlay into your video denoting your speed, pace, altitude, g-force, hang time, jump height and distance, rotations in air, lap times—all kinds of stuff.

43
Two-Year-Old Prodigy Finds Viciously Perfect Solution to the Trolley Problem

The trolley problem is a classic thought experiment in ethics, which asks you to imagine a trolley headed toward a track that five people are bound to. If you pull a lever, you can redirect the trolley to another track, where one person is bound. Do you do nothing at all and watch five people die? Or pull the lever, change fate and be personally responsible for the death of one person?

44
LG put Windows 10 on a fridge

LG is using a 29-inch touchscreen that's also translucent. It's actually really impressive to simply look at, and it's fast and fluid to use. LG's own Windows 10 apps are designed so you can stick notes to the fridge, set a timer, add recipes and healthy information about meals, or simply mark food that you can see through the translucent display. It seems slightly bizarre to have an Intel Atom processor and 2GB of RAM inside your fridge, but once I flicked over to Microsoft Edge to watch some YouTube videos I was intrigued at the idea.

45
Mashable in Discover

Snap to open or click here to download Snapchat

46
Capturing the Creatures of the Underground With … a Scanner?

Thirty holes later, Frye’s perfected her intricate process. First, she selects a random section of her yard that looks interesting, then shovels a hole just big enough for her Epson Perfection 4180 Photo Flatbed Scanner. She lets the roots and dirt settle for a few days, then heads out with her equipment. Frye sticks the scanner in the hole, then plugs it into her computer and a nearby outlet (extension cords are key). She admits it looks a bit strange. “I’m sitting in my yard with a scanner, next to a hole,” she says. “I look ridiculous.”

47
ASUS goes round for the latest ZenWatch

This year’s IFA is certain to be another giant event for wearable launches, but only one company can be the first. Keep in mind, we’re still a few days out from the official kickoff event of the giant consumer electronics event here in Berlin, but the press events have already hit full force.

48
14-inch Razer Blade gets more power, 1080p matte display, and a lower price

The company’s Blade laptop now features the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 graphics processor. That’s almost the exact same chip as the desktop 1060, and it means that the Razer Blade can handle the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive VR headsets and nearly any game at full HD and 60 frames per second. To maximize performance and battery for discerning gamers, Razer is also introducing a model with a 1080p matte display. That’s a lower resolution than the previous generation of this laptop, but it’s one that makes more sense for gaming on a 14-inch portable screen. That lower resolution means the company is also starting the Blade at $1,800 for the 256 GB version as opposed to $2,000. Starting at $2,100, you can get a model with the QHD+ IGZO touch screen.

49
Nintendo's next console will reportedly use cartridges

This is why cartridges make sense for the NX. Although this sort of storage was phased out decades ago for home consoles as optical media began to offer greater storage capacity, cartridges are Nintendo's best choice for its hybrid NX. Increased competition between manufacturers means flash storage has become faster and cheaper in recent years, and Nintendo itself still uses cartridges for its handheld systems like the 3DS. They have the advantage of being more kid-friendly (you can't scratch them like CDs), harder to pirate, and data loads fasters on them than on optical discs.

50
Samsung recalls Galaxy Note 7 over battery flaw

After just two weeks of sales and 35 faulty phone batteries so far, Samsung issues a global recall and promises to replace every unit already sold.

51 Apple must pay Ireland $14.5 billion in unpaid taxes
52 New Razer Blade Stealth upgrades all the original's faults
53 Cats Are Happier and Healthier When You Make Them Work for Their Food
54 Samsung Confirms Note 7 Recall After 35 Reports of Dangerous Battery Problems
55 Facebook Continues Its Assault on Snapchat With Messenger Instant Video
56 The 'Stranger Things' kids reimagined as Dungeons & Dragons characters
57 Lenovo Yoga Book is a pocket-size laptop with a secret keyboard
58 PewResearch Internet on Twitter
59 Report: Samsung to Issue 'Unprecedented' Recall of Note 7 Amid Explosion Fears
60 Hackaday SuperConference: Call for Proposals
61 Forbes Tech News on Twitter
62 Is Google's New Ride-Sharing Service an Uber Killer?
63 Uber Hires Target Marketing Chief as President
64 The Moto Z Got a Giant Hasselblad Attachment and a Phone Jack
65 Box acquires team behind data analytics startup Wagon, service shutting down on October 3
66 Asus' ZenScreen is a portable 15-inch monitor that gives your laptop a second screen
67 ReadWrite on Twitter
68 ReadWrite on Twitter
69 Tile's slimmest Bluetooth tracker won't bulk up your wallet
70 'Iron Man' director's VR game lands on September 8th
71 Lenovo Yoga 910 review
72 Google Coder Analyzes a Billion Files to Find a Winner in Tabs vs Spaces Debate
73 How a Hillbilly Delivery Man Is Trailblazing Our Cyborg Future
74 A Microsoft chatbot is insulting people again, and that’s a good thing
75 Amazon and Wells Fargo Terminate Student Loan Partnership
76 ReadWrite on Twitter
77 Samsung's Gear S3 Is Simply Gigantic
78 A glimpse into Facebook’s notoriously opaque—and potentially vulnerable—Trending algorithm
79 After Steve Jobs stepped down as Apple CEO, he was still working on an Apple TV set
80 An entry-level VR headset that doesn’t need a phone
81 Over 40 million usernames, passwords from 2012 breach of Last.fm surface
82 A 38-inch curved gaming monitor isn’t as immersive as VR, but it’s still pretty neat
83 Wacom’s Intuos 3D package bundles a pen tablet with 3D design software
84 https://science.slashdot.org/story/16/09/02/2051252/fda-bans-19-chemicals-used-in-antibacterial-soaps?utm_source=slashdot&utm_medium=twitter
85 FDA bans antibacterial soaps; “No scientific evidence” they’re safe, effective
86 Amazon, Apple, Google support Microsoft in legal fight for disclosures of government data access
87 Google Analytics can now summarize your data with automated insights
88 Smartphone apps now account for half the time Americans spend online
89 Palo Alto mayor pushes for ban on large tech companies taking over downtown
90 Windows 10 Enterprise now available on subscription from Microsoft's cloud partners | ZDNet
91 I’ve fallen in love with Lenovo’s Yoga Book
92 Getac S410, First Take: A tough, outdoor-friendly 14-inch laptop Review | ZDNet