VMA 2015: Nicki Minaj called out Miley Cyrus live on the VMA stage

While accepting the award for Best Hip-Hop Video at tonight's MTV Video Music Awards, Nicki Minaj held host Miley Cyrus accountable for comments she made in an interview with The New York Times on Thursday. Cyrus was asked about Minaj's Twitter spat with Taylor Swift in July over this year's crop of nominees. "What I read sounded very Nicki Minaj, which, if you know Nicki Minaj is not too kind," said Cyrus. "It’s not very polite. I think there’s a way you speak to people with openness and love. You don’t have to start this pop star against pop star war... I know you can make it seem like, Oh I just don’t understand because I’m a white pop star. I know the statistics. I know what’s going on in the world. But to be honest, I don’t think MTV did that on purpose."

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2
Windows 10 is already installed on 75 million PCs and tablets

On that note, Microsoft hasn’t said nearly as much about the extent to which people are using services like Cortana and the new Edge browser . But Mehdi did offer one encouraging sign: So far, the average Windows 10 device has downloaded six times more Windows Store apps compared to Windows 8. Getting Windows users to try those modern apps is a major part of Microsoft’s “Universal Apps” strategy, which allows developers to easily port their apps to Windows phones, Xbox consoles, and eventually HoloLens .

3
VMA 2015: Kanye West says he's running for president in 2020

Two thousand and fifteen. I will die for the art, for what I believe in. The art ain't always gonna be polite. Y'all might be thinking right now, "I wonder, did he smoke something before he came here?" The answer is yes, I rolled up a little something to knock the edge off. I don't know what's gonna happen tonight. I don't know what's gonna happen tomorrow, bro. But all I can say to my artist, my fellow artist, just worry about how you feel at the time man. Just worry about how you feel and don't never... I'm confident, I believe in myself. We the millennials, bro. This is a new mentality. We're not gonna control our kids with brands. We're not gonna teach low self esteem and that to our kids. We gonna teach our kids that they can be something. We're gonna teach our kids that they can stand up for themselves. We're gonna teach our kids to believe in themselves. If my grandfather was here right now he would not let me back down. I don't know what I'm finna lose after this, but don't matter though cause it's not about me. It's about ideas bro, new ideas bro. People with ideas. People who believe in truth.

4
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5
Tesla's Model S P85D is so good it broke Consumer Reports' rating system

How good is Tesla's Model S P85D? Insanely good,  says Consumer Reports , with the electric sedan performing better than any other car the magazine has reviewed and breaking its rating system in the process. "The Tesla initially scored 103 in the Consumer Reports' Ratings system, which by definition doesn’t go past 100," said Consumer Reports . "The car set a new benchmark, so we had to make changes to our scoring to account for it." The P85D had to make do with a score of 100 instead.

6
New photos reportedly show Apple iPhone 6S Force Touch screen and larger front camera

The iPhone 6 and 6 Plus have 1.2 megapixel front-facing camera sensors and f/2.2 aperture, which Apple said lets in 81 percent more light than earlier iPhones. The larger sensor on the new iPhone 6S (we don’t know exactly how large it will be) should make for brighter and sharper selfies and FaceTime video.

7
Awesome tech you can’t buy yet: Gladiator suits, float tubes, and a giant robot

But the thing is, if you want to enjoy all of these things at the same time, you need all the proper equipment. In addition to a durable float tube, you also need a waterproof Bluetooth speaker, and a dry bag to protect your phone/mp3 player — not to mention a floating cooler you can store beer in. And of course, once you’ve rounded up all this gear, you’ll need to figure out a suitable lashing system to secure everything to your tube.  Tubular offers an alternative to all this madness. Rather than forcing you to cobble all your float gear together like a hobo, the Tubular Tube incorporates all the gear you need into one tricked-out flotation device. Built into the inflatable body, you’ll find a waterproof Bluetooth speaker, a dry bag for your electronics, and a removable cooler. It’s basically the Coolest Cooler of floatie tubes.

8
Back to School Shopping Guide: The best Apple gear and accessories for campus living

You may be in denial that summer is over, but the calendar on the wall doesn’t lie. In the coming weeks, students in the US and other countries worldwide will begin a new school year. No matter what your grade level is or which institution you attend, your return back to the classroom is a good reason to expand your arsenal of technology tools and ensure that you have all the gadgets that you need to make your academic year successful.

9
How To Land A Job Using Social Media

These six tips will help you leverage social networks for a more fruitful job search. Subscribe to FORBES: http://www.youtube.com/forbes Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/forbes/vi... Follow FORBES VIDEO on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/forbesvideo Like FORBES VIDEO on Facebook: http://fb.com/forbesvideo Follow FORBES VIDEO on Instagram: http://instagram.com/forbesvideo For more FORBES content: http://forbes.com

10
The art of stillness

The place that travel writer Pico Iyer would most like to go? Nowhere. In a counterintuitive and lyrical meditation, Iyer takes a look at the incredible insight that comes with taking time for stillness. In our world of constant movement and distraction, he teases out strategies we all can use to take back a few minutes out of every day, or a few days out of every season. It’s the talk for anyone who feels overwhelmed by the demands for our world.

11
The secret to desire in a long-term relationship

In long-term relationships, we often expect our beloved to be both best friend and erotic partner. But as Esther Perel argues, good and committed sex draws on two conflicting needs: our need for security and our need for surprise. So how do you sustain desire? With wit and eloquence, Perel lets us in on the mystery of erotic intelligence.

12
Awesome footage of rare white whale off the coast of Australia

According to Peterson, Migaloo makes an 8,000-kilometre (5,000-mile) return journey along the east coast of Australia from the Antarctic Ocean to tropical Queensland and back again. The migration means Migaloo begins his journey in April, swimming past the Gold Coast in late June and passes by on the way back in late-October or early-November. If this is the beloved whale, he is six weeks behind schedule.

13
6 Netflix Tricks You Aren't Using (But Should Be)

Here are some tips, tricks, and "hacks" (for lack of a better word) that will improve your Netflix experience dramatically, all compatible with the current, revamped version of the site. You may never leave your house again.

14
I’m Sorry I Didn’t Respond to Your Email, My Husband Coughed to Death Two Years Ago — Personal Growth

Also, I’m missing him. Obviously. A lot. BUT: I have a cousin who’s also a widow, and she told my sister that she’s not sure if she’d bring her husband back. Which sounds TOTALLY CRAZY to other people, BUT: When you experience a loss like this, you get to see a really wild new amount of life. Suddenly the range of the type of sad you can feel, to the type of happy you can feel, is busted open. The spectrum from happy to sad isn’t a foot wide anymore — it’s as far as your arms can stretch and then to the edges of the room and then up the block and over into the next neighborhood.

15
This plane? This plane can fly for 118 hours

Adventure requires patience, persistence and leading by example. Piccard has been working on this project for 16 years. “When I started speaking about my vision of a plane with perpetual endurance, a lot of people — especially in the world of aviation — told me I was crazy,” says Piccard, whose first headline-grabbing journey was a nonstop, round-the-world balloon flight in 2009. “You shouldn’t always listen to people who tell you it won’t work.” Meanwhile, while the topic of clean energy typically makes people’s eyes glaze over, Piccard is committed to showing how it might work, not just talking about it. “I wanted to demonstrate that you can achieve impossible things with renewable energy,” he says. Already, their progress has inspired others: “An Indian minister said in an interview that he was inspired by Solar Impulse to make solar trains,” he says. “When we arrived in Hawaii, the governor said they have a goal to use 100% renewable energy by 2045, but now he realized they could be more ambitious.”

16
Human trafficking is all around you. This is how it works

Behind the everyday bargains we all love — the $10 manicure, the unlimited shrimp buffet — is a hidden world of forced labor to keep those prices at rock bottom. Noy Thrupkaew investigates human trafficking – which flourishes in the US and Europe, as well as developing countries – and shows us the human faces behind the exploited labor that feeds global consumers.

17
Mysterious, woman-shaped figure spotted on Mars

NASA's Curiosity Rover took an image of the Red Planet and captured a shape that bears a resemblance to a mysterious ghost lady walking on the planet's surface. The level of resemblance is almost certainly relative to your desire to believe in extraterrestrial life.

18
Don't like clickbait? Don't click

Doesn't it seem like a lot of online news sites have moved beyond reporting the news to openly inciting your outrage (and your page views)? News analyst Sally Kohn suggests — don't engage with news that looks like it just wants to make you mad. Instead, give your precious clicks to the news sites you truly trust.

19
Do schools kill creativity?

Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity.

20
BlackBerry's Android-powered Venice phone surfaces in the wild

BlackBerry's Android-based Venice smartphone isn't just a figment of someone's imagination... at least, if you believe Vietnamese resident Ba Minh Duc. He claims to have photos of the slider in action, complete with its hideaway QWERTY keyboard, 18-megapixel camera and curvy screen. This isn't quite the phone you remember from 3D renders (or the once-teased BlackBerry 10 version ), though. BlackBerry appears to have moved the power button to the side, and the body isn't as slender in person as the renders would suggest. This is undoubtedly a work in progress, and it won't be surprising if the Venice design changes more between now and release. Still, this is exciting stuff if you've been yearning for a phone that melds BlackBerry's hardware and services with Android's customization and wider app selection.

21
Windows 10 is now installed on 75 million PCs after just four weeks

Microsoft released Windows 10 four weeks ago today, and now the company is providing a fresh update on its upgrade figures.  14 million machines had been upgraded to Windows 10 within 24 hours of the operating system release last month, and that figure has now risen to more than 75 million in just four weeks. Microsoft has been rolling out Windows 10 in waves, as a free upgrade for Windows 8 and Windows 7 users. While it's difficult to compare exact figures between Windows 10 and Windows 8,  Microsoft "sold" 40 million licenses of Windows 8 a month after its debut. It took Microsoft six months to get to  100 million licenses of Windows 8 , and it's clear the free aspect of Windows 10 is obviously driving higher adoption rates.

22
Alien Transit Systems May Be a Giveaway in the Search for ET

“Unfortunately,” Loeb says, “there’s not enough push in sunlight to provide a very strong acceleration, so one can imagine using artificial radiation instead.” Loeb and his co-author, James Guillochon, a postdoctoral Einstein Fellow at the Harvard–Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics decided that microwaves would be the best candidate, based on efficiency and other factors. To move briskly between planets in an extrasolar system, they figured, you’d need a microwave beam with about a terawatt’s worth of power. “That’s about a tenth of Earth’s entire output,” says Loeb—kind of a lot. But these are aliens he’s talking about, so they could plausibly pull it off, using a powerful ground-based microwave transmitter aimed at the light sail.

23
Drone rudely interrupts man sunbathing on 200-foot-tall wind turbine

Drone pilot Kevin Miller was capturing some footage of a wind turbine in Rhode Island, when his craft accidentally revealed a man that was attempting to catch some rays on the deck of the turbine, the Daily Mirror reports .

24
The first secret of design is ... noticing

As human beings, we get used to "the way things are" really fast. But for designers, the way things are is an opportunity ... Could things be better? How? In this funny, breezy talk, the man behind the iPod and the Nest thermostat shares some of his tips for noticing — and driving — change.

25
The World's Biggest Cruise Ship Enters Final Stage of Construction

It hasn't been named the world's largest cruise ship just yet, but Royal Caribbean International's Harmony of the Seas  is set to break the record come its first journey in May 2016. The vessel underwent its first float and was moved from a dry dock to an outfitting dock for its final round of construction on June 18th. This is the line's third Oasis-class ship—a series of boat designs featuring various "neighborhoods" full of over-the-top amenities  like a Bionic Bar with robotic bartenders and Broadway productions. Most notably, the design will feature three waterslides that shoot passengers through three levels of the ship.

26
Apple Is About To Lay Down Its TV Cards

Some very smart people I’ve been talking to suggest that, by building a platform, Apple is generating leverage that it can use to great effect in these negotiations. A mid-market breakout box offering is one thing, but a huge, rumbling platform with an upward trajectory of living-room dominating apps and third-party content is another beast. If, obviously if, Apple is successful with the Apple TV, it could be in a position to dominate content in a way that no other ‘smart’ TV platform has before it.

27
Why do ambitious women have flat heads?

Dame Stephanie Shirley is the most successful tech entrepreneur you never heard of. In the 1960s, she founded a pioneering all-woman software company in the UK, which was ultimately valued at $3 billion, making millionaires of 70 of her team members. In this frank and often hilarious talk, she explains why she went by “Steve,” how she upended the expectations of the time, and shares some sure-fire ways to identify ambitious women …

28
Hacker Killed by Drone Was Islamic State’s ‘Secret Weapon’

U.S. and British officials decided earlier this year that a hacker needed to die. Junaid Hussain, a British citizen in his early 20s, had risen fast to become a chief in Islamic State’s electronic army. One person familiar with the matter said he hacked dozens of U.S. military personnel and published personal and financial details online,...

29 West Point professor calls on US military to target legal critics of war on terror

A spokesman for the US Military Academy, army lieutenant colonel Christopher Kasker, told the Guardian: “Dr William Bradford was hired on 1 August 2015 at the US Military Academy. His article in the National Security Law Journal titled ‘Trahison des Professeurs: The Critical Law of Armed Conflict Academy as an Islamist Fifth Column’ was written and accepted for publication prior to his employment at West Point. The views in the article are solely those of Dr Bradford and do not reflect those of the Department of Defense, the United States army, the United States Military Academy.”

30
How to make work-life balance work

Work-life balance, says Nigel Marsh, is too important to be left in the hands of your employer. Marsh lays out an ideal day balanced between family time, personal time and productivity — and offers some stirring encouragement to make it happen.

31
Meet the homeless man who turned his life around by offering book reviews instead of begging

“With some self-motivation and a lot of self-help books, I made the decision to stop taking drugs. But while I was helping myself I also wanted to help the other people I had been living on the streets with. So I started using the money I got from selling books to buy everyone soup and bread everyday instead of spending that money on drugs. Seeing their smiles motivated me to keep using the little I had to spread happiness. From that point on, I knew I never wanted to go back to being a drug addict.”

32
The Derelict Theme Park Where Jurassic Worlds Dinos Roam

And it’s not just a scarcity issue—there are other challenges as well. Not only do film productions need to hire security to keep an eye out for trespassers and urban adventurers, but a robust wildlife population means that experts are needed on set to handle a variety of invasive species, from snakes to alligators to boars. “We have animal wranglers who patrol the perimeter daily,” Donnelly says. “Mosquitos are out there too, but that’s handled by city private visits that spray the barriers, canals, and grass areas to ensure the least amount of activity.”

33
The 25 hottest under-the-radar startups in America

We've compiled a list of 25 of the hottest startups in cities across the US, with a focus on companies growing in flyover states. To do so, we spoke with investors and members on the tech scene.

34
"Muji Is Not A Trend": How Design Fuels Muji's Growth

Muji favors unfinished or natural materials—like rattan, linen, unbleached cotton, bare metal—and subdued colors. This limits the amount of processing on a single item, like painting or dyeing, because it reduces manufacturing costs, which transfers straight to the retail price—it's not about a new back to basics trend, it's about the bottom line. Muji views its products as daily essentials and for that to take hold with consumers, the items must be affordable. "To provide this level of price we remove the frills and color," she says.

35
PCMag on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

36
Serena Williams and Drake as a couple is too pure for this world

The pair shared a private room in the restaurant, which we guess wasn't actually all that private. Multiple photos were snapped of the couple (is it safe to call them a couple yet?) having an apparently romantic time.

37
Suspected car thief ends high-speed car chase with a quick dance party [VIDEO]

You've stolen a car, the police are on your back and suddenly, your tires blow out. What's your plan?

38
Sony's new speaker is a TV remote

After light bulbs , Sony is continuing its quest to stick speakers in unexciting household objects today with the SRS-LSR100. Described on the company's website as a TV speaker that you can keep close at hand, it's basically a TV remote grafted to the top of a speaker — the idea is that you can control your TV and continue listening to shows without having to stay in front of the screen.

39
Windows 95 is 20 years old today

Microsoft also introduced its first idea of syncing data between multiple machines in Windows 95. The My Briefcase aimed to sync files between a laptop and desktop machine, and in modern releases of Windows, it’s all cloud-powered thanks to Microsoft’s OneDrive storage service. Microsoft even introduced user profile support in Windows 95 to allow multiple family members to sign in and have their own separate profiles with links and applications. If you weren’t happy with all the new features of Windows 95 then you could have purchased Microsoft Plus! for Windows 95 at the time. It included the Internet Jumpstart Kit (an early version of Internet Explorer), theme support, and a number of system utilities. Subsequent updates to Windows 95 also introduced new features before Windows 98 arrived three years later to improve things even more.

40
'I've never felt more isolated': The man who sold Minecraft to Microsoft for $2.5 billion reveals the empty side of success

'I've never felt more isolated': The man who sold Minecraft to Microsoft for $2.5 billion reveals the empty side of success

41
The 50 best colleges where students earn high starting salaries

Interestingly, two of the top three schools on this list are elite military institutions. And being that technical degrees often earn college grads higher starting salaries than degrees in the humanities or social sciences, schools heavy on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics programming tended to rank more favorably here.

42
Tyga raps NSFW lyrics about teenage girlfriend Kylie Jenner

The 25-year-old rapper recently released a new mixtape, FukWhatTheyTalkinBout . One of the songs, "Stimulated," drops a reference to his reality star girlfriend, whom he started dating before she turned 18. The lyrics are ... controversial, to say the least.

43
NASA Invites Student Teams to Participate in Underwater Research

44
Your elusive creative genius

Elizabeth Gilbert muses on the impossible things we expect from artists and geniuses — and shares the radical idea that, instead of the rare person "being" a genius, all of us "have" a genius. It's a funny, personal and surprisingly moving talk.

45
Men are flocking to a McDonald's in Taiwan to ogle a female employee

[Weiwei's] manager isn’t too happy about the buzz because many of these fans tend to crowd at the counter trying to talk to or snap photos of her, and if she’s not on duty they end up leaving without making a purchase.

46
Ridley Scott confirms his next movie is Prometheus 2

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47
Blood Tests Could Help Doctors Better Treat Brain Injuries | MIT Technology Review

Developing tests that go beyond diagnosis to do things like assess the risk of long-term damage will require a better grasp of the way the levels of these marker proteins change over time after an injury. Each marker differs in the degree to which its concentration increases in the blood after the injury, the speed the concentration increases, and the length of time the elevated concentration lasts. It would also require expensive long-term studies. “It’s much easier to discover a biomarker than to understand its clinical utility,” says Hayes.

48
LRB · Oliver Sacks · The man who mistook his wife for a hat

Dr P. lived on the East Coast of the United States. He was well-known for many years as a singer, and then, at the local Academy of Music, as a teacher. It was here that certain strange mistakes were first observed. Sometimes a student would present himself, and Dr P. would not recognise him; or, specifically, would not recognise his face. The moment the student spoke, he would be recognised by his voice. Such incidents multiplied, causing embarrassment, perplexity, fear – and, sometimes, comedy. For not only did Dr P. increasingly fail to see faces, but he saw faces when there were no faces to see: genially, Magoo-like, when in the street, he might pat the heads of water-hydrants and parking-meters, taking these to be the heads of children; he would amiably address carved knobs on the furniture, and be astounded when they did not reply. At first these odd mistakes were laughed off as jokes, not least by Dr P. himself. Had he not always had a quirky sense of humour, and been given to Zen-like paradoxes and jests? His musical powers were as dazzling as ever; he did not feel ill – he had never felt better; and the mistakes were so ludicrous – and so ingenious – they could hardly be serious or betoken anything serious.

49
Autism — what we know (and what we don’t know yet)

In this factual talk, geneticist Wendy Chung shares what we know about autism spectrum disorder — for example, that autism has multiple, perhaps interlocking, causes. Looking beyond the worry and concern that can surround a diagnosis, Chung and her team look at what we’ve learned through studies, treatments and careful listening.

50
So, here's a housewife trying LSD for the first time

Here, a LIFE  magazine photographer follows Cambridge, Massachusetts housewife Barbara Dunlap as she joins a group of volunteers trying LSD for the first time in a psychiatric experiment administered by Dr. Madison Presnell of Leary's International Federation for Internal Freedom (IFIF). Surrounded by interesting stimuli such as statues and lemons, she evidently has a very good trip.

51 OneDrive, Dropbox, Google Drive and Box: Which cloud storage service is right for you? - CNET
52 This is either Michael Fassbender in Assassin's Creed, or a really weird poster for Steve Jobs
53 Mark Ronson and Bruno Mars win Best Male Video at the VMAs
54 This Mind-Numbing Machine Lets You Experience Making The Minimum Wage
55 Nicki Minaj's wax figure gets extra security because people are gross
56 Just how big has eSports become?
57 Windows 10 review
58 'Fear the Walking Dead' episode 2 recap: There goes the neighborhood
59 Service pays tribute to slain television reporter and cameraman
60 VMAs 2015: Taylor Swift wins for Best Female Video
61 NASA simulates Mars mission by locking up people in a tiny dome
62 Philips solves Hue’s biggest problem with new dimmer switch
63 Bikes were invented because a volcano killed all the horses
64 Lightbeam for Firefox
65 Take A Trip To This Horrifying Mine, One Of The Largest Man-Made Holes In The World
66 VMAs 2015: Your complete winners' list
67 Which gaming laptops are worth buying?
68 Amazon's Echo speaker plays music from multiple accounts
69 The wealthiest people in the world under 35
70 Buy Spock's uniform, Fizzgig and a Dalek at massive sci-fi auction - CNET
71 Google Classroom updates with Calendar integration, new teacher tools
72 National Geographic on Twitter
73 History of Awesome
74 These Smart Cities Of The Future Were Designed By Smart Middle-School Students
75 Phone data can predict infectious disease outbreaks
76 Frederick Forsyth reveals MI6 spying past - BBC News
77 Rebel Wilson made a police joke at the VMAs, and people are not happy
78 Nicki Minaj and Taylor perform at the VMAs
79 What If The Milk Container Told You When The Milk Was Bad?
80 VMAs red carpet sneak peek: VR puppy cam, vintage TVs and more [PHOTOS]
81 How to make a Mini Pyrography Tool
82 Vine can now put perfectly looping music over your videos
83 Nicki Minaj nabs the VMA for best hip-hop video
84 Susan Bennett | Voices & Vocals
85 Big toys for the big kid in all of us
86 A Researcher Claims That Google Could 'Rig the 2016 Election'
87 Rovio announces more layoffs in effort to focus on games
88 'Mortal Kombat X' won't be coming to last-gen consoles after all
89 Workers Get New Tools for Airing Their Gripes
90 Inside Google's master plan for faster, sharper streaming video - CNET
91 Kanye West's 9 greatest life achievements
92 How Europe Is Finally Taking On Silicon Valley
93 What 12 powerful tech execs do to stay in shape
94 Android Auto now has a desktop emulator for developers
95 Android Pay partners think Google's new mobile wallet has already launched
96 Men catch up with women on overall social media use
97 What will it take for fashion to embrace plus-size women?
98 Our Lingering Questions For Hampton Creek
99 The perfect snacks to pair with today's hottest TV shows
100 Sorry, People, We've Already Used Up Our Entire Ecological Budget For The Year