Amazon to launch video streaming service in Japan

Amazon.com said on Wednesday it plans to launch its video streaming service in Japan for members of its Prime paid service as it gears up for Netflix Inc's planned entry into the country in September.

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2
The Safety Truck Could Revolutionize Road Safety

@samsung tomorrow – Dear Samsungtomorrow team, is it possible to have insight to the results of the tests that were run with the prototype in Argentina? I would be interested to understand what the test criteriae were and – beside the upsides that this innovative technology for sure has in terms of human safety – whether there were any downsides to it as well (e.g. pollution of equipment, potential to irritate drivers behind and cause accidents, etc.). Secondly I would be interested in understanding whether it is planned to only obtain the permits and approvals for Argentina or whether there are implementations foreseen in other countries or regions as well. In particular I would be keen to know if you intend to spread this technology further into Europe and how you rate the chance for success and estimate the potential timeline for the implementation. It would be great if you could please provide me with your feedback or alternatively let me know how I can get in contact directly with the development team. Thanks & best regards, Bernd

3
Facebook M: Meet the Social Network’s Answer to Siri and Google Now

Facebook is the world’s largest social network and it’s the world’s most popular destination to share photos. But it isn’t where most of us go to search the Web, book a restaurant reservation or buy something online. In an attempt to change this, Facebook has built M, a virtual assistant that will live in the company’s Messenger iOS and Android apps, and compete directly with Apple’s Siri, Google Now, Microsoft’s Cortana and Amazon’s Alexa.

4
Is this the Ashley Madison hacker?

The Twitter account itself has heavily criticised Krebs' investigation following the security researcher's blogpost. Deuszu claims to unpick many of his claims, saying that he found the source code on Krebs' website for example.

5
Yahoo Announces New Tumblr Sharing Tools And Native Video Ads For Developers

Simon Khalaf, Yahoo’s senior vice president of publisher products, today outlined some big shifts in the mobile ecosystem and unveiled some new tools for mobile developers. He made the announcements on-stage at the Yahoo Mobile Developer Conference in New York City and in related blog posts .

6
What do Edward Snowden and Elton John have in common? Crustaceans - CNET

A newly discovered crayfish gets named after the NSA leaker and an amphipod after the singer of "Crocodile Rock." Now whose name are we going to use when we find a new species of crocodile?

7
Uber cofounder is taking over stumbling social media company StumbleUpon

It's been a long and unusual path for the startup, which made its name and profits from people sharing articles that they liked and "stumbled upon" on the internet. StumbleUpon would then learn what a user liked and would show them more articles or sites that matched their interests.

8
Amazon to Launch Prime Instant Video in Japan, Taking on Netflix

“As we’ve shown with the launch of Prime Video in the U.S. and around the world, we are investing significantly to bring high-quality, local and popular programming to Prime members, and our customers in Japan should expect the same investment,” Jasper Cheung, president of Amazon Japan, said in a statement. “We’ve been offering videos and DVDs in Japan for 15 years — we know the entertainment customers want — and we plan to deliver it with Prime Video, all at no additional cost.”

9
'Mr. Robot' season finale postponed over a scene's similarity to the Virginia shooting

"The previously filmed season finale of Mr. Robot contains a graphic scene similar in nature to today's tragic events in Virginia. Out of respect to the victims, their families and colleagues, and our viewers, we are postponing tonight’s episode. Our thoughts go out to all those affected during this difficult time."

10
The Next Web on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

11
How to stop Windows 10's annoying Microsoft Office ads

Rather than upgrading to Office to stop Windows 10 from bleating about it all the time, take these steps instead.

12
Google's been recruiting programmers based on their search habits

Don't bother searching for Foo.bar though -- the test is invitation only. Finding the page is easy enough, but it won't let you play if you weren't specifically asked to: "To log in, you have to have logged in before," the page reads. Confused visitors are invited to, you guessed it, search Google for answers. It's a slightly creepy recruitment tool, but it's also fun, quirky and refreshing. Try it out. If you can.

13
Mashable on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

14
Cult classic 'Deadly Premonition' gets deluxe PS3 box set

Deadly Premonition might not be a "good" game, technically speaking, but it's wormed its way into the hearts of a very passionate cult following. With that in mind, this seemingly years-late collector's edition of eccentric Japanese developer Hidetaka "Swery" Suehiro for the PlayStation 3 (fits with the game's weirdness, right?) is packed to the gills with goodies for the fans. Custom deck of playing cards? Check. A 30-page hardcover art book? Present and accounted for. There's a soundtrack packed into the pretty swanky collector's box, the game's director's cut and a download code for additional content so you can while away a few more hours with special agent York in this very Twin Peaks Pacific Northwest, too. Perhaps best of all? The Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut - Classified Edition will only run you $50 and it releases November 24th.

15
Leaked images reveal Microsoft's new flagship Lumia phones

Microsoft is preparing to launch two new Lumia flagship devices at an  event in October . While we've seen  some images emerge along with full specifications,  Evan Blass (Evleaks) has published what appears to be official press renders for both devices. Codenamed Cityman and Talkman, Microsoft is expected to name its new devices the Lumia 950 (Talkman) and Lumia 950 XL (Cityman). The leaked images show both devices, with a slight hump for the camera at the rear. Both sport a simple Windows logo at the back, and a mostly square look. Microsoft's Cityman is the cyan colored handset, while the smaller (5.2-inch) Talkman is shown in black.

16
What Happens When You Mix Virtual Reality with the Real World? | MIT Technology Review

Since March, Wild has been building an experience that combines virtual reality with elements of real life. Visitors wear a virtual-reality headset and headphones, so they’re surrounded by 3-D virtual images and accompanying sound effects and music. But the 3-D scenes include instructions to do things like reach out to turn a doorknob and open a door, and when you do, you find it’s not just a digital rendering of a door but a real door and doorknob that you must open and walk through to navigate from one virtual room to another.

17
The best job in the world is probably being a tour assistant for this cat circus

On August 24, a Craigslist job listing for an assistant in a touring cat circus was uploaded to the website, offering the "opportunity of a lifetime."

18
South Korea's fiery military show is a message for the North

“This is something that’s been going on for a couple of years,” said Jason Yu, a captain in the U.S military from Westchester County, New York. “Every couple of years, they come out here and we do our combined shoots. I don’t think it’s necessarily a message because we are already ready to fight tonight, so this is just our way of maintaining our capabilities.”

19
In the last 30 seconds there were 1,565,880 Facebook likes.

A common myth is that Skype's parent company, Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT), originated as a penny stock before turning into a successful, multi-billion dollar behemoth, when in reality it was never a penny stock. Looking at Microsoft's stock price history, you may see the price of a single share purchased when Microsoft went public on March 13, 1986 reported as less than 10 cents. However, that is the "split-adjusted" price, which is calculated after the multiple stock splits that have occurred subsequently. The actual price that Microsoft debuted at was $28 per share. Learn more about penny stocks and small cap investing strategies by joining our website.

20
CRM and Cloud Computing To Grow Your Business - Salesforce.com

Customer relationship management (CRM) is all about managing the relationships you have with your customers. CRM combines business processes, people, and technology to achieve this single goal: getting and keeping customers. It's an overall strategy to help you learn more about their behavior so you can develop stronger, lasting relationships that will benefit both of you. It’s very hard to run a successful business without a strong focus on CRM, as well as adding elements of social media and making the transition to a social enterprise to connect with customers in new ways.

21
Lil' ICYMI: Lego Arms

Read More: http://www.engadget.com Get More Engadget: •Subscribe to Engadget on YouTube: http://engt.co/subscribe •Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/engadget •Follow us on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/engadget •Follow us on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/engadget •Add us on Snapchat: gadgetsnaps •Read more: http://www.engadget.com Technology isn't all about bits and processors. It's the car with no driver, human organs printed in a lab and leisurely flights into space. It's the future and Engadget is here to tell you all about it. Since 2004, Engadget has covered cutting edge devices and the technology that powers them. We're looking beyond the gadgets themselves to explore how they impact our lives. Engadget is the definitive guide to this connected life. Also on Engadget's YouTube Channel: •“In Case You Missed It” (aka #ICYMI) is a daily clip show designed to dig up the offbeat and interesting stories that get buried by the biggest headlines. We'll bring you space and tech news, as well as internet lifestyle funk, and we'll round out each week's show with a headline blast to bring you the big stories you might have missed.

22
https://clever.com/about/jobs#software-engineer-security

Steve Jobs considered education the final frontier untouched by modern technology; we’re looking to change that. Clever is a team of seventy, located in San Francisco (near Caltrain and BART), helping schools bring digital learning to the classroom. We take care of the massive amount of data that needs to move behind the scenes, letting schools focus on using technology to improve learning. You can check out some of the challenges our engineering team is tackling on our engineering blog .

23
5 Reasons Every Entrepreneur Should Start Blogging

If you're an entrepreneur—or an aspiring one—you may think blogging is the last thing you've got time for. And you might be right. After all, there's no immediate business value to be drawn from writing regularly, and it takes away the time you might spend developing your product or speaking to investors. But only by running your own business do you learn that it's precisely those long-term investments—which don't always show immediate payoffs—that make all the difference. Blogging is one of them. Even though its value is so hard to quantify, many of the most successful entrepreneurs are dedicated to the practice and see it as something crucial to their roles. Here are five reasons why blogging is so important for entrepreneurs.

24
6 gadgets to help you keep track of your kids

When kids are young, most parents have some kind of monitoring device at home to keep tabs on the tots when they're in another room. Whether they're audio-only or combo audio/video contraptions, baby monitors are extremely common. In addition, though, there's a slew of other devices that can help parents keep track of wayward munchkins whether they're in the house, at the park or at a crowded outdoor event. From GPS watches to clothing with embedded tracking devices , read on for a look at these new ways to keep an eye on your offspring. Gallery | 6 Photos 6 gadgets to help you keep track of your kids

25
TechCrunch

Facebook is the latest tech titan to try and bring a consumer-focused digital assistant to the largely uninterested populace. M is a largely text-based hybrid assistant that can rely on human knowledge when need be to help answer queries that are a little bit more complicated and may require a human touch. Apple, Google, Microsoft, Amazon and Facebook now all have their own digital assistants… Read More

26
2 suggestions to make Twitter infinitely better

No, only kidding. My shirts are not nearly as cool and my bank balance is not nearly as large. But hey, here’s some ‘fixes’ I think Twitter should work on. Jack, you can have them for free with this added piece of advice – stick around to implement them.

27
Biological tools create nerve-like polymer network

A nerve-like assemblage created by protein nanomotors acting on polymer filaments at Sandia National Laboratories. Credit: Sandia National Laboratories Using a succession of biological mechanisms, Sandia National Laboratories researchers have created linkages of polymer nanotubes that resemble the structure of a nerve, with many out-thrust filaments poised to gather or send electrical impulses.

28
An honest guide to the San Francisco startup life

I moved to San Francisco two years ago to work for a startup called Padlet . I love it here. It’s like being in Hollywood, but with less-good-looking people. You have the celebs, you have the scandals, you have the media frenzy. My friends back home are full of questions:

29
MIT created a solar-powered machine that turns saltwater into drinking water

As Probably not just alluded to, technology exists to clean water from almost any state of contamination. As nice a project as the MIT one in the article is, it is really a small increment technologicially - using solar power/batteries as a power source. Electrodialysis is used in hospitals every day to support failing kidneys. It is a fairly complex technology but aren't they all. All desalination methods require energy (distillation, reverse osmosis) or chemical reagents (ion exchange - e.g. water softeners). As Probably not concluded, this would not work on fracking waste, though there are lots of methods that would. The requirement for fracking waste is a social/regulatory/financial framework that 'encourages' the industry to do the right thing and clean up their messes. It won't happen in our current climate. So, kudos to MIT, but before crowning them, review the > 60 year history of tech-based water projects in developing countries (there have been more than one could count), in which you'll find great enthusiasm at first, western companies drinking from the public/foundation trough to sell tech, and at the first sign that maintenance is needed, and it will, the whole thing collapses, without education and financial infrastructure to support it.

30
A Short Lesson in Perspective

Many years ago, when I first started to work in the advertising industry, we used to have this thing called The Overnight Test. It worked like this: My creative partner Laurence and I would spend the day covering A2 sheets torn from layout pads with ideas for whatever project we were currently engaged upon – an ad for a new gas oven, tennis racket or whatever. Scribbled headlines. Bad puns. Stick-men drawings crudely rendered in fat black Magic Marker. It was a kind of brain dump I suppose. Everything that tumbled out of our heads and mouths was committed to paper. Anything completely ridiculous, irrelevant or otherwise unworkable was filtered out as we worked, and by beer ‘o’ clock there would be an impressive avalanche of screwed-up paper filling the corner of the room where our comically undersized waste-bin resided.

31 Here’s what happens when you try to replicate climate contrarian papers | Dana Nuccitelli

This new study was authored by Rasmus Benestad, myself (Dana Nuccitelli), Stephan Lewandowsky, Katharine Hayhoe, Hans Olav Hygen, Rob van Dorland, and John Cook. Benestad (who did the lion’s share of the work for this paper) created a tool using the R programming language to replicate the results and methods used in a number of frequently-referenced research papers that reject the expert consensus on human-caused global warming. In using this tool, we discovered some common themes among the contrarian research papers.

32
Facebook Launches M, Its Bold Answer to Siri and Cortana

Facebook’s goal is to make Messenger the first stop for mobile discovery. Google has long had search locked up on the desktop: Right now, if I’m looking to treat my summer cold, and I’m in front of my laptop, I begin by googling “cold meds Upper West Side.” On mobile, however, I may pull up any number of apps–Google, Google Maps, Twitter–to find that out, or I may just ask Siri. Facebook starts at a disadvantage on mobile because it doesn’t have its own operating system, and therefore users must download an app, and then open it. Marcus hopes to make up for that by creating a virtual assistant so powerful, it’s the first stop for anyone looking to do or buy anything.

33
LG Display shows off press-on 'wallpaper' TV under 1mm thick - CNET

At a press event in its home country of Korea on Tuesday, LG Display showed off a "wallpaper" proof-of-concept television. The 55-inch OLED (organic light-emitting diode) display weighs 1.9 kilograms and is less than a millimeter thick. Thanks to a magnetic mat that sits behind it on the wall, the TV can be stuck to a wall. To remove the display from the wall, you peel the screen off the mat.

34
When online shaming spirals out of control

Twitter gives a voice to the voiceless, a way to speak up and hit back at perceived injustice. But sometimes, says Jon Ronson, things go too far. In a jaw-dropping story of how one un-funny tweet ruined a woman's life and career, Ronson shows how online commenters can end up behaving like a baying mob — and says it's time to rethink how we interact online.

35
Days numbered for barcodes as shoppers demand more data

Longer term, more products could carry wireless tags such as the RFID labels that are being widely rolled out across the fashion industry. These tiny tags, which can be embedded in an object and, unlike a barcode or QR code, do not need to be within the line of the sight of a reader, were long too expensive for everyday goods but their price is falling fast.

36
Here is the badass truck replacing the US military's aging Humvees

The High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle — the HMMWV, or Humvee — is a stalwart of the battleground. If you asked someone to draw a military truck, they'd almost certainly draw this classic machine, which is almost older than a millennial (1984!) and gained such a pop culture following at one point that civilians started buying them. Arnold Schwarzenegger, in particular, is famous for his undying love of the "Hummer."

37
Amazon Announces One-Hour Alcohol Delivery

Amazon.com Inc ( AMZN.O ) said on Tuesday it will begin delivering wine, beer and spirits to U.S. customers for the first time as part of its speedy delivery service, Prime Now.

38
This Is Why No One Follows You on Twitter

But first, it's a good idea to take a look at how most people will see your Twitter profile. If someone finds you in his or her Home stream, or clicks on a "Who to follow" suggestion, the Profile Summary pop-up below shows what your potential audience sees of your Twitter presence.

39
Italy’s Summer Beaches Look Even More Beautiful From Above

Take Bernhard Lange , for example. When the German photographer visited an Italian resort on the Adriatic Sea, all he could think about was how the endless rows of beach umbrellas might look photographed from the sky. “Already from the ground, they looked very symmetrical, repetitive and graphic,” he says. “I thought they might look even more interesting from above.”

40
5 signs an employee plans to leave with your company’s data

It's important for IT security managers to communicate with the human resources department so they are aware of pending layoffs or other personnel issues that might lead to employee departures. “You have to look at whatever data is available in their corporate environment, such as an HR data source. If an employee has a termination date or is being terminated for any reason, then you have to look at that person’s system activities with increased scrutiny,” says Andras Cser, vice president and principal analyst at Forrester Research, serving security and risk professionals.

41
China's Unigroup chairman visiting U.S. to discuss Micron bid: sources

Micron dismissed an informal $23 billion offer by state-backed investment firm Unigroup in July on the presumption that the U.S. regulatory committee that reviews foreign acquisitions of sensitive U.S. companies would block the deal on national security concerns, sources have said.

42
The Real Story Behind the Global Bike-Share Boom

Does it feel like suddenly, bike-share programs are everywhere? The seemingly simple concept has indeed swept across the globe in a matter of just a few years. This is the story of just how quickly a great idea can spread when combined with the right technology—and a few fateful bumps along the way. By Sarah Goodyear

43
Feds Raid 'World's Largest Male Escort Site' in Manhattan

Federal agents raided the Manhattan headquarters of Rentboy.com as part of a money laundering and state prostitution investigation Tuesday, authorities said. Jonathan Dienst reports. (Published Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015)

44
3 ways to fix a broken school

If you’re going to lead, lead. “What happens in a school and what does not happen in a school is up to the principal,” says Cliatt-Wayman. “I am the principal, and having that title required me to lead.” That meant stepping up and taking charge. “I was not going to be afraid to address anything that was not good for children, whether that made me liked or not.” At Strawberry Mansion High School in North Philadelphia, she worked with her leadership team to tackle issues both small and large. They posted cheerful messages on bulletin boards and made sure the lightbulbs worked — and rebuilt the school schedule to include flexibility for children with hugely different needs. But their best invention ever? The school-wide discipline program called “Non-negotiables,” a behavior system designed to promote positive behavior at all times. The result? “Strawberry Mansion was removed from the ‘Persistently Dangerous’ list our first year, after being on the list for five consecutive years,” Cliatt-Wayman says.

45
Woman from famous 9/11 'Dust Lady' photograph dies of cancer

Marcy Borders, who was from New Jersey, had been working for a month at Bank of America in the north tower. On Sept. 11 at 8:46 a.m., the 28-year-old was standing next to the photocopier on the 81st floor when a plane smashed into the building a few stories above. Despite a manager's direction to wait for fire wardens, Borders ran for the stairs and began to make her way down.

46
Police in North Dakota can now use drones armed with tasers

Police in North Dakota are now authorized to use drones armed with tasers, tear gas, rubber bullets, and other "non-lethal" weapons, following the passage of Bill 1328.

47
Poll: Is 3D TV dead? Do you care? - CNET

After significant hoopla followed by years of mediocre reviews and tepid consumer interest, 3D seems to be disappearing. Do you care? Take our poll.

48
Has Stephen Hawking solved a huge black hole mystery?

Hawking — working with Malcolm Perry, of the University of Cambridge in England, and Harvard University's Andrew Stromberg — has come up with a possible solution: The quantum-mechanical information about infalling particles doesn't actually make it inside the black hole.

49
Two guys drove a Tesla almost 500 miles on a single charge

Bjørn Nyland and Morgan Tørvolt made the trip in Denmark by doing what's called "hypermiling." It's an (unpleasant) hobby of making your car run at maximum fuel (or in this case, electrical) efficiency. That means driving at a constant, slow speed, avoiding braking and full stops, and — most importantly — leaving the air conditioning off. Nyland and Tørvolt's 452.8-mile trip took them nearly 20 hours to complete (with one total hour of stoppage time) because they were traveling at an average of 25 miles per hour.

50
Beautiful Pictures on Twitter

When you tweet with a location, Twitter stores that location. You can switch location on/off before each Tweet and always have the option to delete your location history. Learn more

51 Friendly humans stop to shelter soggy dog left out in the rain
52 WWE 2K16 Hands-On: Wrestle Smarter, Not Harder - IGN
53 Why the U.S. is No. 1 -- in mass shootings
54 Zano drones struggle to achieve lift-off - BBC News
55 For the love of God, put me on the Iron Maiden plane
56 The single biggest health threat women face
57 N64 classic Turok: Dinosaur Hunter is being remastered for PC
58 Google’s Container Engine For Running Docker Containers On Its Cloud Platform Is Now Generally Available
59 Destroyed By Rockefellers, Mural Trespassed On Political Vision
60 The shaky science of shattering the moon in 'LawBreakers'
61 Recreations of your favorite games in six-second Vines
62 The Algorithm that Predicts Psychosis
63 Harry Potter re-imagined as the villain of a horror movie is unexpectedly bone-chilling
64 Ask A Dev: What is deep linking?
65 How To Make A 3D Hologram With Stuff You Already Own
66 New game from 'Gears of War' creator breaks the moon
67 Giving Minecraft a story
68 All aboard Van Beethoven, where Oculus Rift meets the 19th century - CNET
69 Reg Saddler on Twitter
70 All nine hours of The Hobbit's extended trilogy will hit theaters in October
71 Meet Y Combinator’s New COO
72 You can spend a day watching Star Wars toys get unboxed live on YouTube, if that's what you're into
73 Adobe will introduce a new Photoshop for iOS this October
74 Drone Oversight Is Coming to Construction Sites | MIT Technology Review
75 Intel’s new 5×5: Tiny form factor, socketed CPU | ExtremeTech
76 The 20 Most Infamous Cyberattacks of the 21st Century (Part I) | MIT Technology Review
77 20,000 people gathered in Spain to throw tomatoes at each other
78 One Hundred Years of Arm Bars
79 The Windows 10 Review: The Old & New Face of Windows
80 Google inviting very small number of developers into futuristic Project Soli
81 An Open Source Map That Tracks the Government’s Hard Work
82 The One-Man, $1.2 Billion ETF Shop
83 Ghost Public Revenue Dashboard
84 Workflow Lets You Put Shortcuts To Frequent Actions Right In iOS’ Notification Center
85 Super fun teachers sing 'Les Misérables' parody for new school year
86 Airbnb starts collecting tourist tax in Paris, its most popular destination
87 Comeback of the century: The California sea otter's return from the brink of extinction
88 Aussie bar uses naked women as fruit platters, sparks outrage
89 A Peek Inside Mr. Robot’s Toolbox
90 Woman becomes Internet darling with bizarre homemade Al Green music video
91 Workers Get New Tools for Airing Their Gripes
92 China starts cleanup after Tianjin blasts, arrests officials and warehouse managers
93 A Fully Mechanical 3D Printer is Mind Blowing
94 How Nairobi Got Its Ad-Hoc Bus System on Google Maps
95 Pintasking brings multi-tasking to just about any Android device
96 Russia's next space station trip will take days, not hours
97 Welcome to SubTropolis: The Massive Business Complex Buried Under Kansas City | Empeopled
98 VPN down: China goes after Astrill, other anti-censorship apps in run up to WW2 anniversary parade
99 Android Pay partners think Google's new mobile wallet has already launched
100 5 ways women can help women succeed in the workplace