Google Search Will Now Also Feature Content From iOS Apps

Last month, Google started showing results from Android apps that users didn’t have installed on their phones, something it will now also do for iOS users. Just like on Android, this new feature will bring a whole new app discovery mechanism to Google Search for iOS users.

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2
Apple Watch charges faster through its secret port

Every Apple Watch has a secret port hidden beneath its bottom band, and it turns out the port could be pretty useful. While Apple isn't saying what it's for — it's likely hidden away and covered up for a reason — accessory maker Reserve Strap has been able to use the port  to provide power to a Watch . And it turns out, the Watch may even charge faster that way than through Apple's inductive charger.

3
Here's Where Grandmas Get Graffiti Lessons--And Demonstrate Mad Street-Art Skillz

LATA 65 ("lata" means "can" or "tin" in Portuguese) is a nonprofit organization built on urban workshops for senior citizens in Lisbon where they learn the history of graffiti and street art, as well as how to make their own stencils and street tags. The group, along with professional street artists working as hands-on mentors, targets run-down and neglected parts of Lisbon with beautification (not destruction) in mind. The mission of LATA 65 is to democratize street art by bridging the age gap, which will hopefully nix stereotypes on both ends.

4
The Most Creative Insults from "VEEP"

The saga of Selina Meyer is steeped in profanity-riddled slander. Here are Co.Create's favorite (very NSFW) burns from the first 3 seasons.

5
Snapseed 2 welcomes back the Grunge filter

In an update to a recent update, the developers of Snapseed, Google’s mobile image editor, circled back to address some complaints about what it left out and also to add a few new things.

6
GoPro Working On A VR Camera Array And Quadcopter Drone

Today, GoPro announced that it was working on an array that combines six GoPro Hero cameras for spherical shots all at once. CEO Nick Woodman says that when Facebook bought Oculus, the ‘gauntlet was dropped’ and GoPro started work on a spherical setup that could generate content for virtual reality and augmented reality systems.

7
Microsoft announces Phone Companion app for Windows 10 and teases Cortana for Android and iOS

The Phone Companion app will be built directly into Windows 10 — Microsoft’s new operating system that’s expected to launch for the public this summer — and it’s designed to help users sync up content between their PC and mobile phone. It basically offers an easier way to access existing functionality, such as setting up Microsoft’s OneDrive cloud-storage service to work across your devices. This means that files such as photos you snap, notes you take (OneNote), and documents you edit (Office) are available on all your devices.

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All the Google and Android News From Google I/O | WIRED

The proceedings are streamed live on YouTube so everyone can watch, but we here at WIRED will also be running a Google I/O liveblog during the show. We know what you’re thinking: If it’s being streamed, why a liveblog? Because we love liveblogs. Oh yes, and also, we can provide the type of intelligent context and insight you can’t find anywhere else.

9
Google Search Will Now Also Feature Content From iOS Apps

Last month, Google started showing results from Android apps that users didn’t have installed on their phones, something it will now also do for iOS users. Just like on Android, this new feature will bring a whole new app discovery mechanism to Google Search for iOS users.

10
Is paying a monthly fee for pro A/V software in your future? | ExtremeTech

Pro Tools , Avid’s audio editing software, has long been considered the industry standard Digital Audio Workstation (DAW) software in the music business. While some of the newer and more user-friendly programs are making headway, you still won’t find a major studio, or many home studios, that does not have Pro Tools installed. So, it was a shock to many when they released Pro Tools 12.0 on a subscription basis. The monthly fee is a reasonable $29.99. Currently, it is still possible to buy the full product outright for $899. But, if you plan on upgrading when a new version becomes available, you need an annual “upgrade plan” that is an additional $199 per year. The annual “upgrade plan” is included in subscription models, but if you bought the product outright, the cost is $199 per year just for the option of paying the upgrade price when a new version is available. Pro Tools 11 owners have until the end of 2015 to get on an upgrade plan, or else they will be forced to pay full price if they decide to purchase the latest version at a later date.

11
Science a bit shaky in earthquake movie 'San Andreas'

Science a bit shaky in earthquake movie 'San Andreas' The disaster flick San Andreas -- about huge earthquakes ripping California apart -- opens Friday at theatres nationwide. So how would a real scientist review the movie? Check out this story on USATODAY.com: http://usat.ly/1HM7lvc

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Netflix Says Streaming Is Greener Than Reading (or Breathing) | WIRED

For its part, Netflix says it seeks out servers in regions powered primarily by renewable energy and mitigates the rest of its carbon emissions by investing in renewable energy credits. “Netflix is being a bit defensive because they’re trying to make it seem like their piece is very small, but they are a big part of the online world,” Cook says, noting that the credits they mention are more of a “veneer” to say they’re offsetting Amazon’s non-renewable energy usage, but not doing much to fix the problem itself. Instead, Cook says, Netflix should encourage Amazon to embrace renewables—it is one of the cloud company’s biggest customers after all.

13
7 Bizarre Conspiracy Theories Spotted on Google Maps

These types of maps are not limited to fictional, fantasy worlds, though. Using My Maps, People have created custom Google Maps of things that fit best under the category of cryptozoology. Spottings of Thunderbirds, the Loch Ness monster, Bigfoot, and others of their ilk have been recorded on maps that span the globe. There's a map of cryptid areas that blocks off whole sections of chupacabra and death worm sightings. And if you want to, say, find out all the names Bigfoot goes by around the world, there's a map for that , too.

14
Ad-blocking software is definitely not illegal, another German court rules

One month after a German court ruled online ad-blocking technology is perfectly fine, a second legal challenge has now arrived at the exact same conclusion.

15
This single text message is crashing people's iPhones - here's the fix

Original story: Apple's iMessage platform has been subject to a new bug that shuts down your entire iPhone after receiving the message "effective. Power لُلُصّبُلُلصّبُررً ॣ ॣh ॣ ॣ 冗".

16
Google's Hiroshi Lockheimer On The Present And Future Of Android And Chrome OS

Toward the end of our conversation, I asked Lockheimer how much time he spent thinking about Android's and Chrome OS's future past the next release or two, and what they might look like a few years from now. I thought I was giving him an opportunity to wax eloquent on pie-in-the-sky stuff. Instead, he stayed practical, and said that developing operating systems can't be done in isolation from the components they use and the devices they'll run on. Running engineering for these two operating systems requires him to think about everything from chips to merchandising.

17
Is Your Nervous System Being Hacked by Bacteria in Your Gut?

Some 80 per cent of the traffic along the vagus nerve is sensory information sent up to the brain by the body, and researchers are beginning to realise this has a significant influence on the mind. There is also now strong evidence from animal studies that the gut’s microbial residents – known as the microbiome – can activate the vagus nerve, with effects on brain and behaviour.

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Live from Google's 2015 I/O keynote!

The stage is set, the Moscone Center is tricked out with leopard print Androids , and Google I/O is just about to start . You know the drill here: The first order of business is an hours-long keynote address that'll show us exactly what Google's been working on behind closed doors these past few months and what we can expect to play with in the future. Android M? More insight into Android Pay? VR announcements? It seems like this year's show is really going to have it all. We've got a little more time before the keynote kicks off, so hang tight, thumb through our I/O preview for as a quick refresher, and stay tuned for more shortly.

19
What Re/code's Acquisition Says About the Future of Digital Media

Between those two ends of the spectrum, however, lies the valley of death. Re/code was able to convince someone like Vox to buy it in part because it had a well-known conference business, and because it had the star power of Swisher and Mossberg. But the hard fact is that it couldn’t survive on its own, even with financial help from Comcast/NBC (which now owns a stake in Vox Media from two different directions as a result of this deal).

20
15 Things You Should Never Say to a Woman Who Just Came Back From Maternity Leave

Honestly? I haven’t yet figured out the answer to that question myself . . . I’m just too busy doing it! And hearing you ask makes me feel kind of naked. It’s hard right when you come back to work after having a baby; you feel like you’re never doing your best at everything all the time. But mostly, I just feel grateful to have all of the good things in life that I do. I don’t have the answers for you . . . and while I’m flattered you’d ask, the best thing you can do at the moment is just keep working hard and being thoughtful of the people above you and below you on the food chain. And we’ll do the same for you when it’s your turn.

21
Apple’s Jeff Williams Says Native Watch SDK Will Give Direct Access To Sensors

Williams says that he wore Android Wear watches and other devices for short periods of time but it “didn’t really help them” decide what they wanted to do in the space. Current Apple Watch apps are unable to access sensors on the Watch directly and do not actually run on the Watch, but project their interfaces to its screen from the iPhone. More capable apps will be able to be designed for the Watch once the native SDK — which has many of the functions Apple used to make its own apps — is released at next month’s WWDC conference.

22
Pebble Time review: Can Pebble's latest watch do better than Apple's?

The Pebble Time vibrates when it gets messages, shows upcoming events, and can run a number of apps: fitness ones, utilities, games, novelty watch faces. It's more of a wrist-pager than a full-blown gadget. But, it can run a lot of its basic functions, like time, alarms, and basic utility apps, without a phone being connected. Still, like most smartwatches, it's meant to stay connected via Bluetooth to your smartphone most of the time.

23
GoPro announces a $3,000 spherical camera rig for capturing VR video

The rig — a sort of cubical framework — holds six GoPro Hero 4 cameras in an arrangement that lets them capture video in all directions simultaneously. The price of these cameras together is about $3,000, Woodson said, plus a yet-to-be-determined price for the rig itself.

24
GoPro will release a quadcopter in the first half of next year

Well, it's happening — GoPro is officially getting into the drone game. Following  rumors last year , GoPro CEO Nick Woodman announced at the Code Conference that the company was going to build its very own quadcopter, with plans to launch in the first half of 2016. "The quad is in some ways the ultimate GoPro accessory," Woodman said. He then went on to note that the devices are core enough to their business for it to make sense to go out and build their own.

25
YC-Backed Eden Launches To Offer On-Demand Electronics Repair And Installation

There is no doubt that the technology of today, from smartphones to connected devices to WiFi everywhere, is making our world a more convenient and navigable place. But in many ways we’ve grown dependent on this type of lifestyle, which makes a busted device or a malfunction a debilitating experience.

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How a Piece of Cardboard Could Be Google's Ticket to VR | WIRED

What’s most remarkable about Cardboard’s ascension—muted though it might be—is that Google doesn’t actually make it. The company provides downloadable instructions on how to build your own, and otherwise points seekers in the direction of about a dozen Google-approved Cardboard partners, like DODOcase and Knoxlabs, that will send you pre-made units constructed from cardboard or aluminum or everything between, for anywhere from $17 to $85. In the most high-profile collaboration, Mattel recently announced that it will use Google Cardboard tech and specs to revive its View-Master brand this coming fall .

27
Google I/O: Android Pay, Photos, App Permissions — Live

Google released its new Photos app at its annual I/O conference. The search giant also unveiled its answer to Apple Pay and a new way for users of Android devices to select what information they share with apps, among other things.

28
How Can I Get A Good Job With No Experience?

You didn’t mention which fields you’re interested in entering, but you did say your English degree was useless. I strongly disagree. An English degree may not translate immediately to a great focused job the same way a degree in, say, accounting might do, but it certifies that you have high-level skills in communication, analytical thinking, and creativity—skills that are greatly valued in many workplace settings. Depending on the professional and educational choices you make now, your degree can be the springboard to anything from law to journalism to technical writing to teaching.

29
Google I/O keynote: Join us at 9:30 a.m. PT Thursday (live blog) - CNET

What I'm expecting are: unveilings of new Android Wear watch designs (like the Tag one), hopefully talk of iOS compatibility, ways Android Wear can tap into other Google services, and lots and lots of VR via Cardboard. And...I'd love to see a peek at Magic Leap, or something weird.

30
Ford joins Tesla in opening up its electric car patents

One of the biggest issues in the automotive industry is that when car makers come up with an innovative new technology, it can take years for others to catch up. Tesla made a positive change when it opened its patents to further the adoption of electric cars, and now Ford is getting in on the act too. The company announced today that it will make at least 650 patents "dedicated to electrified vehicle technologies" available to other car makers, but unlike Tesla, is asking for an undisclosed fee. Ford already has six hybrid or all-electric models available to buy, but seems intent on increasing that number with a little help from its new facility located near Henry Ford's original labs in Dearborn. It intends to hire another 200 electrified vehicle engineers at Ford Engineering Laboratories this year, allowing it to "solve bigger challenges and help improve the industry." Now all we need is for Toyota and co. to follow suit.

31
Startup Job Offers And How To Interview Founders

“If you’re offered a seat on a rocket ship, get on, don’t ask what seat. I tell people in their careers, ‘look for growth.’ Look for the teams that are growing quickly. Look for the companies that are doing well. Look for a place where you feel that you can have a lot of impact.”

32
Google, GoPro bring virtual reality to the masses with Jump

Google, GoPro bring virtual reality to the masses with Jump Google's big news from its developers conference this week is Jump, part of a series of upgrades to its for-the-masses virtual reality project, Cardboard. Check out this story on USATODAY.com: http://usat.ly/1HPe07P

33
It looks like Lego is building a Minecraft rival

With the E3 gaming conference coming up next month, it’s a fair bet that we’ll hear more about ‘Lego Worlds’ soon. In the meantime, we’ve prodded Lego in the off chance that it fancies spilling the blocky beans.

34
Woman's donated leg mummified using ancient Egyptian practice - CNET

First, the researchers got ahold of two legs that were removed from a recently deceased woman who had donated her body to science. The legs were amputated within 24 hours of her death. The scientists chose to work with legs only because using the whole body would have been too complicated. "If we used the whole body, we would have had to cut it up and take out the intestines [and other organs]," Papageorgopoulou told Live Science.

35
Google Opens Inbox To All, Adds Smart Reminders, Trip Bundles, Undo Send And More

With this update, developers will now also be able to embed deep links to native apps into emails. Google has long supported what it calls ‘highlights.’ That’s the special email markup airlines use, for example, to allow Google to easily get your flight information from an email and display it Gmail and Inbox, including the Trip Bundles feature. Now, they will also be able to add deep links to their native apps, so users don’t have to switch to a web view (where they may have to sign in to a service again, too) to see more information. Launch partners for this feature include Hotels Tonight and Eat24.

36
Google Launches Android M Preview With Fingerprint Scanner Support, Android Pay, Improved Permissions And Battery Life

Android M feature a completely revamped permissions process. Instead of asking users for all of their permissions in a single dialog when they install the app, Google will now move the process to when users run an app for the first time. And instead of asking for all permissions at once, developer can choose to ask them only when the app needs them. So a camera app may ask for camera, microphone and camera roll access right when you first launch it, but then it will ask for access to your contacts only once you want to share a photo or video. That way, developers can ask for permissions in the right context and users will understand why the app is asking for access to this info.

37
Announcing embeddable card stacks

As they have existed for the past 12 months, the card stacks have been a very useful addition to our site, appearing at the bottom of articles or as a hyperlink on highlighted words in an article. But we've known that the vast majority of the situations in which readers might want contextual information might not involve reading an article on Vox.com. And so we don't want our card stacks limited to Vox.com, either.

38
Everything You Need to Know About FIFA’s Corruption Scandal | WIRED

Sure, soccer has been riding a growing wave of popularity, and the World Cup is now a more visible event, but it still lags behind many other sports in mainstream popular consciousness. Because of that, American culture just doesn’t revere soccer enough to consider FIFA sacrosanct. But consider the basketball version of this: let’s say FIBA, the world organization for basketball, decided to hold an international tournament in December that meant the NBA would have to suspend its season for a month. American superstars wouldn’t show up, the best team in the world wouldn’t be properly represented, and the world’s biggest TV market for the sport would be in open revolt against the event.

39
What to expect from Google I/O today

Google's I/O 2015 conference starts Thursday with a monster 2.5-hour keynote. Android M, the next major version of Google's mobile operating system, is likely to lead the way. You can expect Google to run through its usual showcase of Android's latest and greatest features on stage, and it's likely the company will shine a similar spotlight on Android Wear and Android Auto.

40
The 10 most important things in the world right now

7. The main parties opposed to Burundian President Pierre Nkurunziza's running for a third term said in a joint statement that the country had sank "into a political and security mess" and that it would be impossible to hold peaceful and fair elections next week .

41
Twitter Needs to Change, But Only if It Stays the Same | WIRED

In the past few months, Twitter has been shifting away from its user-driven beginnings to a place where the company has a little more control. It’s embracing new features to curate users’ feeds ever so slightly, and a report of stalled talks to acquire the magazine-like Flipboard reader suggests it’s seeking to add even more. Twitter is realizing what Facebook and Google have long known: we, people of the Internet, have come to expect that the digital world knows what we want and gives it to us. But for Twitter to succeed, it will need to make more than just new users happy—it must keep its free-flowing spirit alive to keep core users from fleeing to new streams.

42
Why Google's Jump for Cardboard Is a Game Changer

Cardboard's low pricepoint makes virtual reality content available to anyone with a compatible smartphone, and at this year's I/O conference, Google announced a number of Cardboard enhancements that promise to make the platform even more accessible.

43
The Vox Media-Re/code deal, explained by Vox Media’s CEO

Not much day to day. We have a great events team led by Jen Leibow. Her group will continue to do what it does, organizing successful events for Vox Media and our advertisers. This is very different work than running the Re/code conference business which is what Lia will do. Over time, as often happens across many groups at Vox Media, we would not be surprised to see some radical collaboration, sharing of learnings from each other, or at the very least clinking glasses with new colleagues who share a deep appreciation for how much work goes into making an "in real life" production look effortless.

44
https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/12339/157815?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=smpost&utm_content=may-20&utm_campaign=may-28-insight-webinar

May 28th, 10 am PST/1 pm EST Sponsored by: FollowAnalytics Abstract: If you think MMA is just a toy for small hip startup game companies -- you'd be wrong. From car companies like Kia and Land Rover to banking companies like ING and retailers like Starbucks, Walgreens and Macy's, enterprises are leading the charge in this space -- and winning the fight for marketshare in their verticals. When it comes to mobile marketing automation, the enterprise has a unique problem -- many MMA solutions are built for small app dev houses and don't have a feature set equipped to tackle enterprise-grade demands. VB Insight surveyed 375 mobile developers and 1.8 million apps to uncover the hottest MMA solutions. We also figured out the best bets for the big guys and some best practices from industry leaders. What you'll learn •How top enterprises are using mobile marketing automation to reach their audience •How to MMA can be the x-factor for achieving value back to the organization •VB Insight’s best bets for mobile marketing automation solutio

45
How to win the talent war without outspending your competition

Attacking this concern directly is how Administrate , a very small company with fewer than 25 employees has been able to compete in the white-hot market of Edinburgh, Scotland. “One benefit we just started which has proved to be a game changer is we went to a 4-day, 32-hour workweek,” says CEO, John Peebles, “But we still pay everyone a 5-day wage.” This might seem drastic — even expensive both in terms of productivity and pay — but Peebles says the opposite is true. “This has been a big differentiator, doesn’t cost the company anything, improves overall productivity and focus, and helps develop a better quality of life overall for our team.”

46
5 Questions About the IRS Data Breach

Stolen personal data is often used to open credit-card accounts and rack up fraudulent charges. (The accounts should show up on your credit reports even if they aren’t used immediately.) Another risk is that other criminals may see an opportunity now to use emails or other communications purporting to come from the IRS in an attempt to get consumers to supply personal information, supposedly to clear up the problem. In its news release, the IRS emphasized that the letters it sends to affected households “will not request any personal identification information from taxpayers.”

47
Microsoft's new Windows Store policy will combat junk apps

It's no secret that Windows Store has serious issues not just with scammy apps, but also with spammy ones. Now, Microsoft is finally addressing that problem by introducing a stricter certification policy for new and existing apps that could clean its catalog enough to make browsing the store less painful. The new policy has four main points starting with eliminating apps with almost identical names and icons, those whose titles don't match up with their content, and those that aren't very useful or unique. Microsoft will also prune away applications considerably more expensive than similar ones in its category. The company now requires informational apps to be clearly labeled as a "guide" or as a "tutorial," as well, else they risk being purged. Finally, an app's title, description, tags and keywords should all be relevant to what it does, otherwise Microsoft might delete it. These rules sound like they could demolish most clone and junk apps from Windows Store if properly enforced -- let's hope Microsoft makes sure that they do. Source: Windows Tags: apps, microsoft, mobilepostcross, windows, windowsstore

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